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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi friends,

My boys dental condition is really really bad :( it's actually my fault didnt brush him daily and all but now its really bad.

Let me share some of those pics -


He dont let me brush because it's quite sensitive i think.. im using this expensive oral care spray daily (from petzlife) but its not helping much. I tried brushing in between but the plaque/stain is not going off.. im worried that vet will do an extraction.. I dont want him to suffer.. do you guys think i can still save his teeth? If you guys have any ideas pls do share im really worried now 馃槩
 

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At that stage there is nothing you can do. Please talk to your vet about getting an anesthetized cleaning. If any teeth need to be removed it's because they are causing him terrible pain, so it's necessary. He likely has issues beneath the gum line that aren't even visible. Give him a chance to be pain free and have a fresh start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i know that is the right thing to do guys. im quite positive that he is doing ok and not in pain.. he is a happy dog, eating well (kibbles) and no digestion issues etc...

In any case i think i should bring him to the vet. thank you all
 

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It may just be the color of my display but the gums look pretty red and inflamed. If this is periodontal disease, you may not be able to avoid extractions.

Do your buddy the biggest favor and get those teeth attended to by a vet as soon as you can get scheduled.

Once you get past that, whatever it takes, there are alternative brushing methods you might not have known to try, and some dog toothpastes are considered downright treats by many dogs.

If it is affecting his gums, that can affect more of his whole system so, don't wait longer than necessary.
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Not saying this is the case with your dog, but Gracie was quietly in pain for years before she made her discomfort known to me. And even then I didn鈥檛 imagine it was her teeth. So grateful for the vet who connected the dots. The day after surgery, it was like I had a younger dog. :)

Dogs are hardwired to keep up with the pack and avoid showing weakness. They can hide a heck of a lot from us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thank you.. I'm waiting for my paycheck will definitely bring him to the vet. its quite expensive here. Surgical cleaning without extraction can cost up to $500 and with extractions it can go up to $1000-1500 so must be prepared.
 

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Not sure where you are located, but I would check into Care Credit. The price range you are sharing is on the cheaper end, but your vet should be able to give you a better quote if your dog allows them to look in his mouth.
 

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My oldest of my two has bad teeth. She is 11 though and I don't want to use anesthesia. She just weighs 5 pounds. I wish I could extract her teeth because they must be causing pain. My 7 yo has good teeth. Both have no use for brushing their teeth. It is such a struggle.
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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My oldest of my two has bad teeth. She is 11 though and I don't want to use anesthesia. She just weighs 5 pounds. I wish I could extract her teeth because they must be causing pain. My 7 yo has good teeth. Both have no use for brushing their teeth. It is such a struggle.
I was hesitant, too, but after weighing the risks with my vet, and factoring in the indescribable amount of pain that dental issues can cause (as well as the potentially long lifespan so many small dogs are blessed with) we went ahead.

At 14, when she required surgery again, I balked. We lost her just a few months later. :( I鈥檒l never know if I made the right decision. Did I spare her or condemn her? How do we ever know? The simple answer is we don鈥檛. We just do our best.
 

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It's not my intent to scare you, or to cause undue worry, but it's very important to understand the potential for additional specific health risks.


Complications of Gum Disease

Periodontal disease can cause more problems than tooth pain, says O'Morrow. For example, dogs with unchecked gum inflammation may be at higher risk for heart, kidney, and liver disease.


"The ultimate complication is one I see too commonly, and that is pathologic jaw fracture," Beckman says. Over time, untreated gum disease can destroy bone to such an extent that even a little pressure will fracture a small dog's weakened jaw.


Understanding that cost is a real factor, as is going under anesthesia, still, go over all of the information with your vet after having a thorough assessment of your pup's current health.
 

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All of my toys have had dental issues (small mouths, big plaque producers). I never got serious about tooth brushing until we got our current toy Jo, and this was because our last toy, Lexi, ended up with multiple tooth extractions and then heart issues at 13 (she passed at 15 from heart failure). I can鈥檛 be sure the bad teeth and heart issues were connected, but the connection was possible and I wanted to minimize the risk as much as I could.

So, when we got Jo, I vowed to keep her teeth as pristine as possible. From the time we brought her home I have brushed her teeth almost every day. I also spray with PlaqClnz every day. She is now 5 and her dental health is pretty darn good. I treat before and after, and she tolerates it well. It is tricky to learn how to brush such a small mouth, but once you get the hang of it it only takes about a minute. Well worth it. Plus, less doggy breath!

Start brushing as young as possible. Every time I want to skip brushing I just think of Lexi, and how much I wished I had brushed her teeth more often.


Lexigirl
 
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