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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So, I noticed Pavie had some plague on his back teeth and some dark stains on his fangs about a year ago, and they are stuck on kind of tight. I ended up reading up on dog dental cleanings and some websites suggest dogs should get routine dental cleanings just like humans. We went to our vet and they did a quick exam of his teeth, but the vet said the condition isn't bad, and he can probably wait another year before he gets a dental cleaning. Over the past year, we did more brushing and occasionally letting him eat raw bones, and I think it has helped clean some of the plague. But there is still some plague and stains. I'm wondering if it is time for his first dental cleaning or should we wait another year or two? I am quite nervous about the general anesthesia.

Could you all please share your experiences? Do you do dental cleanings for your dog at all? If so, how frequently? How do you tell when it is time to do one? What was the procedure like? Any side effects?
 

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My last dog (16 year old mixed breed) got her teeth cleaned under a general when she was about 9) That was the one and only time. Her teeth were checked at each Vet visit and I was told she only needed the one cleaning. She got a massive case of diarrhea after (the correlation/causation question). That lasted for about 3 days. I'm in no hurry to put Rhonda (Spoo) through a general, but I will if it's suggested.
 

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Just got the poodles’ teeth cleaned for the first time at ages 7 and almost 6 years old.

Maizie also had a benign lump removed. She was quite out of it and still staggering when I picked them up from the vet, and it took her until late the next morning to fully wake up. She didn’t eat or drink anything the first day, and she wasn’t responsive to me.

Frosty, on the other hand, was acting pretty normal when I first picked them up, and he was able to drink water and eat dinner without any problem. Frosty had diarrhea once on the first day; Maizie did not.

Glad to have gotten it done, and am very motivated to brush their teeth every day to try to postpone the next one as long as possible.

ETA: As to the frequency or when is it time for the first dental, I left that up to the vet to make the decision because they know best. My Vet actually said I could put it off a little bit longer than I had been thinking!
 

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Elroy: Standard Poodle, Born 02/20/21
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Elroy had an anesthesia free dental cleaning in March, shortly after he turned a year old. He was booked for an hour, but he was so well behaved and cooperative, she was done in just under 30 minutes. You may be able to find a similar service at a holistic vet, which is where I found mine. I recommend you Google "anesthesia free dog dental" and see if there's anything nearby. It cost me just under $300. His teeth weren't terribly bad going in, but they were very clean when complete. I intend to do it annually or there abouts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the replies.

The reason I asked is because I think different vets can vary a lot in opinions when it comes to dental cleaning. Some websites recommend it as frequently as once a year:

Our previous vet who told us that we can hold off at least another year was pretty down to earth and usually doesn't recommend a lot of extra treatments when she thinks it's unnecessary. Unfortunately, they closed a couple of months later after we had our dental consult since the owner retired. When we set up an intake appointment for our new vet shortly after they closed, I asked about the dental cleaning again and the dentist said we can book a cleaning right away if we want. I didn't book at the time, since our old vet said we can wait, and I think Pavie's teeth had improved over those few months due to better brushing and raw bones. So this is my experience of different vets having different opinions. And some may be more money driven than others.

I have looked into "anesthesia free dog dental", but unfortunately there aren't any in my area. Amazon and Chewy do sell scaling tools, but I don't have any experience using them:
 

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Happy's teeth were checked right before we moved in June. Vet said the same to me, we could wait another year ot two. I brush daily, but there's still some discoloration. I'll probably get them done next year around her third birthday. Happy is pretty chill, so maybe I should try doing it myself.

Both my late JRTs had substantial dental issues in their final years. I made a promise to Happy and myself not to neglect her dental health.
 

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I go by what my vet recommends - Poppy has never had a serious build up of tartar; Sophy has had three dentals in 13+ years - one under sedation, two under GA. At the most recent one she needed three teeth extracted as well as the cleaning, but in a 13 year old toy that was rather to be expected. Brushing certainly helps, keeping the gums healthier even when it doesn't remove all the tartar.
 

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My Greyhounds have never had a dental. Our vet checks them yearly but unless she sees something serious, we are on the same page about not putting them under anesthesia. I will feel the same when my Poodle is older. Instead, I brush teeth several times a week and feed dental chews once a day. Periodically they also get raw bones.
 

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It is going to depend on the dog. Some dogs need it very often and some may never need it. My chihuahua is 15 years old and only has 3 teeth. My Poodle is almost 11 years old and she needs a cleaning every few months and still her teeth are falling out at a rapid rate. I usually have my chihuahua's teeth done every time the poodle's are done. Because I get them done so often, the total bill for anesthesia free is $175 which covers both dogs. I figure 4 times a year, it is still cheaper than if I had it done under anesthesia once a year. (which isn't possible because my vet says with Misha's liver problems and deviated trachea, he prefers me to do the anesthesia free).
 

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So, I noticed Pavie had some plague on his back teeth and some dark stains on his fangs about a year ago, and they are stuck on kind of tight. I ended up reading up on dog dental cleanings and some websites suggest dogs should get routine dental cleanings just like humans. We went to our vet and they did a quick exam of his teeth, but the vet said the condition isn't bad, and he can probably wait another year before he gets a dental cleaning. Over the past year, we did more brushing and occasionally letting him eat raw bones, and I think it has helped clean some of the plague. But there is still some plague and stains. I'm wondering if it is time for his first dental cleaning or should we wait another year or two? I am quite nervous about the general anesthesia.

Could you all please share your experiences? Do you do dental cleanings for your dog at all? If so, how frequently? How do you tell when it is time to do one? What was the procedure like? Any side effects?
I've had 7 poodles in my lifetime, 4 standards. I think every pet owner should got to the pet store and purchase a DENTAL PICK. This will allow you to lightly get the dog used to YOU flicking that plaque off their teeth while they're young. It doesn't make sense to take them to the dentist ever 2-3 years and have to hve them put under sedation because were to lazy to do the right thing.
 

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Tonka' s first vet visit we saw a Brit vet who was here on an exchange(?) or something like that.
He focused on one of his canine teeth that was a bit brown from plaque, and told me that may be an indication that he's been favouring that tooth... possibly from pain(?)
Anyway, he used to get a raw, frozen or thawed, Chicken back every day.
The flexible bones acted like plaque scrapers. Kept all his teeth plaque free.
 

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I've had 7 poodles in my lifetime, 4 standards. I think every pet owner should got to the pet store and purchase a DENTAL PICK. This will allow you to lightly get the dog used to YOU flicking that plaque off their teeth while they're young. It doesn't make sense to take them to the dentist ever 2-3 years and have to hve them put under sedation because were to lazy to do the right thing.
Wondering why the vets don't suggest this if it's feasible for the average dog owner. I will look into it tho.
 
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I was once told just using the pick without polishing afterwards could cause trouble due to leaving an uneven surface (if memory serves) on the teeth, which could invite more deposits.

But - I don't recall who told me, and cannot say if it's accurate. May be worth asking a veterinarian. Sounds like some have had good experience using one, and many years ago a topnotch breeder suggested using one to me. It was some time after that I received the caution.
 

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A more through job is done by a Vet. But, there are people who do it without anesthesia. Under GA the dog should only need a couple during their lives, unless there is a dental issue. At least, that's what our Vet told me.
For a standard poodle and other large breeds, that is probably true. But for toy breeds, I’ve heard every year is fine under general anesthesia (isofluorane) if it’s needed.
 
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I suppose, for most people, their Poodle (Standard or otherwise) will have an annual exam (biannual, or whatever). As part of that, teeth will be checked. If the Vet thinks it's necessary, they will suggest a cleaning. They should also show and explain why. So, one can bite the bullet and submit to a GA or not.
 

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Everyone is acting like a dental under general anesthesia is super risky...am I missing something? Many of our dogs have had yearly dentals. The poodles have better teeth, so they have only needed one so far. Yes, anesthesia is risky for very old dogs, dogs with heart problems, certain breeds like greyhounds, etc. But many dogs get frequent dentals!
 

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General anesthesia always carries risks. True for humans, true for dogs. Most will get through it fine, but some won't. This is probably the reason people look for possible alternatives. The fewer times a dog/human has a GA the better.
 
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