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Discussion Starter #1
I know there's a ton of threads about dehydrating treats.. (but I can't find this specifically, so could someone link me if it does exist? Sorry & thanks!)

Daisy (7 pound toy poodle mix, not a crazy chewer at all) is a picky eater, she doesn't like most dental chews (all that I've tried) but then I came across dehydrated duck necks at a local pet store (2 for $8). She loves them (I break them in half because a whole duck neck is a little much for her in one sitting), and I'm wondering if it'd be cheaper to make them myself. So I'm trying to do my research first~

Here are my current questions/problems:
1. Can I buy any cheap dehydrator (most likely I'll look on amazon) to use for chicken/duck necks? (Or is there some specific heat setting it needs to reach in order to properly dehydrate something that thick?).
2. If I can use any dehydrator- about how long do you think it will take, and will it smell? Also, is it true I'll need to pop it into the oven after to make sure all the bacteria are dead/all the moisture is out?
3. I live on Oahu.. so there's no butcher shops that I know of, but I read some people can get chicken necks from Safeway and Whole Foods. Any other recommendations? Does anyone know where I can get duck necks? (My cousin has an adult ~25lb corgi- and I'd like to make some for him too because he really loves them, but I think chicken necks are too small for a corgi?)
4. Is there anything else I should keep in mind while doing this? (Or should not be doing? lol..)

Thank you in advance!
 

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Before you get too involved with this you should research the problem with thyroid hormones (hyperthyroidism) from duck and chicken necks. They probably should be a rare not a daily treat.

Here is one article:
 
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Skylar's right. But also I would caution that dehydrated bones can be dangerous in the same way that cooked poultry bones can be. Dehydrating removes the moisture and makes the bones brittle, which could result in danger to the digestive tract as they are passed. I know they do offer these dehydrated treats in stores, but it is not something I would risk. Raw chicken or duck necks are much safer than the dehydrated ones and are just as good (maybe better?) for dental health. Good safe alternatives (if you want to stick to dehydrated stuff) would be beef/lamb trachea or cow/lamb ears.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Rare treat as in.. once a week? (Currently I give one to her once a week-ish).

I did hear that- dehydration makes bones brittle, but I heard both sides- one says it makes it brittle due to the heat, the other says no it only pulls out the moisture and keeps the bone as if raw. And from what I see (when Daisy chews the store bought ones) it doesn't look to be splintering.. should I gently take a hammer to the duck neck bone to see? (she always leaves 2- 3 neck bones behind to chew later/I think she gets tired from all that chewing).

I did consider trachea before, but the times I bought it in store... the local pet store I supported at the time- only sold trachea in a ($30) mixed bag of other treats.. as in only 3- 4 pieces mixed in with a couple other stuff (totally not worth it). That she liked, but I only wanted the trachea.. So I bought a bag of just tracheas online- she didn't seem interested in them at all! (super disappointed, is there a way to get her interested in it again? Could it be the bag/tracheas were too old? Or too big for her tiny mouth?). Not sure, but my local store didn't supply that mixed bag again.. (and then they closed & moved). My only other choice (besides buying online- shipping can be painful!) is the big stores like petco. As for how much do I trust/want to support them.. mmmmm...you know?

Due to current conflicting household opinions/issues- I cannot give raw bones at the moment. Cow/lamb ears... just.. kind of make me sad... I'd rather not...

But I also try to regularly brush her teeth! This is more of a treat/bonus on helping to keep her teeth clean while also being good for her. And thanks for your responses!
 

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You can try stuffing or coating the inside of the trachea with something yummy like canned food or some yogurt and peanut butter. You could also try cutting them into smaller pieces to see if the size is an issue (might also be easier to fill this way).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You can try stuffing or coating the inside of the trachea with something yummy like canned food or some yogurt and peanut butter. You could also try cutting them into smaller pieces to see if the size is an issue (might also be easier to fill this way).
Good idea! But... I feel like this is similar to stuffing a kong. And she hates it. Refuses to chew that thing since day 1 (I bought several different ones for her when I first got her at 3 months old, 4 1/2 years later.. and it still looks like new). And I stuffed it with food, treats, peanut butter.. she would just lick the hole where you stuffed the treats/food in to. No chewing. But I'm totally willing to try.
 

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My boy is the same. The only thing that really encourages him to chew is the new puppy... whatever she has in her mouth, he needs one too. It’s been great for his dental health 😉
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My boy is the same. The only thing that really encourages him to chew is the new puppy... whatever she has in her mouth, he needs one too. It’s been great for his dental health 😉
🤣 yesssssssss!!!! Daisy can be soooo picky, but whenever we have a guest dog over.. BAM. Eaten. Gone. No problem. 🐶 I knew it, it's settled, we need another puppy. 😋
 
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