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Hi everyone!

I'm in the final countdown before getting my tpoo puppy in about a month. I've had dogs before, and currently have a heeler mix. I'm not sure if it's an old school thought process or not but I've always had new puppies sleep in their crates downstairs until they proved reliable enough to sleep upstairs in a bed. Reliable as in, will sleep all night without chewing, having an accident, ect. usually until 1.5 yr old. I've gained a lot of training knowledge since then and my current dog is stable and doesn't have separation anxiety when I leave home despite being glued to me at all times when I'm with him.

So my question is, do I continue my old ways and leave puppy downstairs at night, or should I keep the crate in my room?
My main goal here is to not create separation anxiety. (I realize this is also something to be taught on during the daytime) I know poodles are very smart and love their people which attracted me to them since my dog now is like that and I love it! But any insight into others experiences or rationale for either approach is welcome.

If it helps, I follow a balanced training method. Thanks!
 

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Peggy's the first dog I've kept out of the bedroom at night, but I put a lot of work into making sure she loves going into her crate to sleep, and continue to "top up" this training even at 11 months. Once she's in there for the night, she doesn't stir. Not even if I come out to get water or a snack in the middle of the night. I'm sure it helps that we keep her crate covered with a blanket when it's sleep time.

I know some feel strongly that puppies should be close to you, but I think if you put the time into proper, compassionate crate training, it doesn't really matter where it's located. For us that meant a few nights sleeping out in the living room with her, and then occasionally sitting by the crate as she fell back to sleep after a late-night potty, or even letting her fall asleep on the floor next to the crate and then plopping her sleeping little body in after a few minutes.

We also set a timer so we were the ones waking her up in the middle of the night and not vice versa. It was very important to me that she never call the shots on when it's time to wake up or come out, but I'm also diligent about tracking her potty needs and always make sure she has a snack in there before bed and water available 24/7. So she never needs us for anything while she's confined. She can just relax.

Teaching a dog to relax when you're out of sight is, I think, a wonderful gift to give them.
 

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I think puppies need to know they are not alone at night for the first few nights at least, which means sleeping close enough to them to reassure them if necessary, unless there is an older dog to take over parental duty. Many people find it easiest to have a crate in the bedroom, or - as I did - simply take the puppy to bed; others sleep with the puppy for a few mights in whatever room is the long term aim. Some leave the pup alone to cry it out. I have not come across any research into the effect of the different methods on separation anxiety later in life, though.
 

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Ol Boots..I've always followed the same as you. Our crate is in a corner of the kitchen and pup went it from day 1. I did use a blanket at times to cover it. I also did it so the dog wouldn't have separation anxiety. And too it was until about 1.5 years when I knew the dog was reliable not to eat my house. LOL Renn was different though (although I did the same). I used a divider, which he wasn't so fond of as I later learned he loved to stretch out to sleep. He is totally glued to me except for when he went into his crate then he was fine. A while back he decided he would not sleep in the crate anymore, I don't really know why but I usually gate him off in my from foyer and dining room area. He has lots of space and a bed and there he is fine. Like his own big room where he can move around play with his toys and sleep in his bed in all those crazy positions poodles like so much. Well I've rambled on I think if I were to get another poodle I'd have two crates, day crate and night crate, (next to me). The longer I have him the m ore I see he is quite different than any non poodle I've ever had. Even training is different from old school.
 

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Your past routine has worked for you, correct? I'm a softy, so I sleep on the couch closest to the door with the puppy sandwiched between me and the back of the couch for the first couple weeks. I wake up to a squirming puppy, and we make a quick run for the door before squirming puppy turns into leaking puppy. Once the puppy understands the concept of humans becoming boring at bedtime, we switch to puppy going into a crate in the bedroom. However, my way definitely isn't for everyone, and it sounds like your way has been successful in your household.

I think separation anxiety springs from the intersection of several factors. Genes, household routines (or lack thereof), traumatic events at just the wrong time, that sort of thing. The dogs with the absolute worst separation anxiety I've seen have been Aussies, rehomed at least once before age 18 months, which then ended up with owners who didn't implement a consistent routine and discipline. An overabundance of intelligence, drive, and loyalty combined with repeated shocks and uncertainty produced deeply insecure dogs.
 

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LOL, yes even though our crate is in the kitchen the first week is spent outside on the floor till the puppy is asleep then we go to a couch in close proximity. As I learn the pups "potty" habits we make adjustments.
 

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I couldn't put the puppy crate in our bedroom because of boyfriend's allergies. I did let pup fall asleep on the couch with me and then transferred him to the crate after last potty break. He cried the first two nights. I let him cry it out. He stopped. He has slight separation anxiety tendencies but he is totally fine being crated at night or even penned while I'm home. He doesn't mind me penning and leaving if I give him an offering chew treat.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone! It’s interesting listening to other points of view. I’ve really never even gotten up in the night to let a puppy out before and haven’t had incident but this time I will be getting up! I’m still torn on the crate placement but I think she will be downstairs. I’ll also probably stay close for the first little bit!
 

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My first dog was an abandoned poodle that came to me at 2 years old. I never used a crate with him because I wasn’t even aware of the option back then. My mini Lacey is nearing 10 months old and my first time having a puppy so take this advice as you will :)

I brought her home at 8 weeks. I put her crate in my dining room on the main floor. For the first three nights I slept on the couch in the living room, basically within her sight, then I started sleeping in my bedroom upstairs after that.
For the first week she’d cry at first for 15 minutes and then settle for the night and not another peep. I never got up in the middle of the night to let her out. She always stayed in the crate quietly (once settled) for 8 hours. I also kept water available 24/7 to her, despite what vets and breeders tell us to do (very important!). She never once had an accident in her crate. I used the divider at first so there wasn’t anywhere to pee. Eventually she “earned” the whole crate even though I bought one that had a lot of extra space for her adult size.

The next part I’m going to say is going to be controversial. I know most people wake up to take out their dog at one point during the night because they physiologically aren’t supposed to be able to hold it for 8 hours, but I say you should try not letting her out in the middle of the night at first. Especially if you are home all day during the day to let her out every hour and increasing during the first few months.
If she doesn’t cry to be let out in the middle of the night, dont take her out. If she cries to be let out or has an accident, then start doing it, but let her out before she starts crying, like PeggyTheParti says.

I had her sleep in the crate downstairs until she was 6 months old. Then I started letting her sleep in bed with me because I was 100% confident she wouldn’t pee in the bed. If she was a bigger dog that could jump off the bed I would’ve waited another few months to be sure she wouldn’t jump down and try to chew things she shouldn’t be chewing. Since she can’t get down, I keep a bowl of fresh water on the nightstand for her :)
I’m a firm believer of the use of a crate (and even better if an ex pen is attached). I still have Lacey sleep in the crate at least one night a week and she goes in there to take naps during the day sometimes too. She’s very comfortable in there. I think crating from the moment they come home if they’re a puppy is one of best ways to prevent separation anxiety, since they learn that their crate is their safe and relaxing place. I also think it’s good not to be in the bedroom at night as part of learning that it’s ok to be alone. But this is only if you are able to be with them all day for the first few months of life so they aren’t alone in the crate all night and then all day.
I can leave Lacey in the crate and go upstairs for the night and she just goes to sleep. She does bark and cry when I put her in the crate and actually leave the house, but she settles down within 5 minutes and does just fine for as long as she needs to be left. I know this because I watch her on camera to ensure she wasn’t having signs of separation anxiety when I left her. Otherwise, she is a Velcro dog, always nearby me.
Sorry this was so long. Mostly want to say go with what’s worked for you in the past. And congratulations on your new baby coming home. It’s so hard to wait! Please share a pic of your puppy when they come home. ❤
 

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Crating wasn't a thing yet with my two early poos. They had beds in the kitchen under the desk and slept at night wherever they wanted, after they were house trained or were sleeping in my room or my brothers.
When we got Sass, she slept in a cardboard box by my bed so I could reach down and let her know I was there if she fussed.
It wasn't until she was much older and quite infirm that I kept her on the bed with me , rather than loose thru the house, so I would know if she needed help.

I started with beds for Holly and Noel, in the bedroom, to help with the adjustment. It turned out that DH didn't like sharing the bed with them but they loved trying, so crates next to the bed became a thing. They were in their condo's while DH was sleeping, then on the bed with me or roaming til I got up. We worked offset schedules so that was actually practical for us.

Now the boys have the condo's by the bed and sleep in them til DH gets up. I'm more comfortable knowing they're near at night, in case they're not well, or something should happen that we'd need to get to safety quickly....Kansas...tornados, that kind of thing. If we're lucky they'll still be by my side overnight for many years more.
 

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Interesting! I have always thought that letting them out at night sets a president that they will always be able to but I figured I’d keep an open mind these days! I’ll have to see what’s shes like and what works for her. I usually do a last potty call at 12am anyways since I’m always up late. She will have an expen attached to her crate, and we will actually have to practice leaving her alone since people are almost always home. I’m excited to train another dog!
 

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That's a little like saying changing a baby's diaper sets the precedent that they can pee and poop as they please, with no consequence. :)

I try to respect the physical limitations of puppy bowels and bladders, while simultaneously teaching the lesson that I call the shots on out-time. And I do that by staying carefully ahead of my puppy's changing needs.

Peggy made it very clear to us when she no longer needed latenight potties. 😂 She was practically sleepwalking within a couple of weeks.
 
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