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Hi! We are adopting our new and first ever dog this summer - a standard pup. I am starting to do research now and the breeder has given me some good ideas but I wanted to follow them up with questions here.

-For families crate training, where does the new puppy sleep? In the crate in a bedroom? If so, do I need a crate for downstairs too? I will be getting a 36" crate with a divider and 36" high x-pen.

-Are wire crates the best, or do you like the airplane crates? Do you attach the crate to the x-pen

-Do you put puppy pads down in an x-pen during the day, or is that too confusing?

Thank you all in advance...
 

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Welcome! All of your questions can be answered with "You can do it either way." The most important thing is to do what works for you and your family and your routine. Puppies are fairly adaptable as long as their basic needs are met.

Many people initially put the crate in their bedroom, but many also keep it in the kitchen/family room. There may be less whining in the bedroom but then you probably have to transfer it elsewhere later. You don't need a different crate unless you want to have two. 36" is a good size crate though you may need a bigger one if your spoo is on the larger side.

Wire or plastic crates work. You can attach to x pen if you want. I prefer plastic kennels because they are lighter to carry, but I don't think they can have dividers. If you go with plastic I highly recommend petmate compass kennels. If you have a wire crate you may want to put a crate cover to help the pup settle.

You can use puppy pads but it is often recommended not to because they tend to train a puppy to pee on soft things. And you probably don't need them if you have a good potty training schedule in place. It is highly recommended to have a waterproof liner down underneath your x pen.

Others will chime in I'm sure. Feel free to ask additional questions.
 

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Thank you. I’ll keep flexibility in mind! If you do use a plastic crate which size do you recommend initially?
 

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I would use one type of crate in the bedroom, and the other type for during the day. This way, you don't have to move a crate back and forth. Also, he will learn to be comfortable in either type. I do not use a crate with an older puppy who knows the ropes, but I do supply something nice to lie on if he won't chew it.
 

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Congratulations on your new addition!

I recommend getting an adult-sized crate with a movable divider (so it can grow with puppy) and attaching an exercise pen to the entrance. This setup has been a godsend for us.

We use a Frisco crate and pen (both from Chewy) and have no complaints except with the smell of the plastic crate tray. I aired it out for weeks with no change, and I think it's very cruel to coop a puppy up with a smell like that. We replaced it with a thin wooden board cut to size and covered with a thick reversible bathmat (i.e. no rubber bottom). I use a thin breathable blanket to cover the crate on three sides, leaving one side open to the wall for airflow.

The crate and pen are in our open concept living/dining room. I decided this time around that puppy wouldn't be sleeping with us, though my husband did sleep next to the crate on a cot for the first little while. Eventually, once we retire the x-pen, I'll probably move the crate to the bedroom. For now, I like that Peggy can retreat to her own quiet space while still being "a part of things." I expect she'll continue using that part of the house even after her crate and pen are no longer there, so I chose a spot that will be perfect for a dog bed—close to the action but not underfoot.

I have zero interest in using puppy pads, but we're also home during the day. As long as puppy has someone available for frequent potty breaks, I wouldn't confuse him or her with any indoor pottying.

If he or she will be left longer than reasonable for a developing bladder and bowels, then yes, an indoor toilet area will be necessary.

I would refer to this guide for all things puppy:

 

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When my boy Pogo sits upright he is 34 inches from toes to topknot. He is a smidge over 26 inches at the shoulders when standing. A standard 42" crate is 30" tall. A standard 48" crate is 33" tall. Pogo tends to be a bit claustrophobic; he's much happier when he's not bumping his head. He therefore prefers a 48 inch crate, as it gives him tolerable head room. A 48" crate is the size of a small loveseat and is pretty overwhelming in a small room. At this point I use baby gates to keep Pogo out of rooms I don't want him in; he only gets crated when we travel with him.

Regarding wire vs plastic crates, plastic tends to hold more heat. Pogo and Snarky were summer pups, and I don't have central AC. I used to listen to poor Pogo gasping in his plastic crate next to my bed, even with a fan blowing into the crate. We decided that continuing to crate him was cruel. We let him and Snarky sleep on the slate floor of our sunroom instead. Pogo flatly refused to go back into the plastic crate when the weather got cooler. My sister's retriever loved his plastic crate, however. He was deeply distressed and started sleeping in the shower when she stopped using it.
 

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We used an xpen for our standard poodles when they were young. And (gasp) our dogs sleep in bed with us. Honestly you can tell right away when they need to go out, and everyone has a nice sleep right from 8 weeks on. I never worried about crate training because there are lots of other short periods of time that we left the house and had to crate them. So as someone said above, do what's right for you. Poodles are so smart, just be persistent and they'll be toilet trained in no time

Sent from my VOG-L04 using Tapatalk
 

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When my boy Pogo sits upright he is 34 inches from toes to topknot. He is a smidge over 26 inches at the shoulders when standing. A standard 42" crate is 30" tall. A standard 48" crate is 33" tall. Pogo tends to be a bit claustrophobic; he's much happier when he's not bumping his head. He therefore prefers a 48 inch crate, as it gives him tolerable head room.
Peggy's 48" crate just arrived! She keeps going into it and looking up. I think she's marvelling at the headroom. :LOL:
 
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