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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We finally found a breeder and decided to get a spoo puppy in fall 2019. He was born Christmas Day 2019. I went to collect him at the end of February 2020 and then COVID brought everything to a halt a week later! So unintentional quarantine puppy!

We’ve definitely had our challenges with him and his energy levels! He’s definitely calmed way down in the last 3 months or so. Now that he’s about 14 months old, we are struggling with how to have people over to our house again. He goes to daycare once a week and doesn’t go crazy or jump all over the ppl working there. Likewise when my husband or I come home he trots up to greet us but doesn’t jump or get excited.

However, as we’re starting to try to invite people over again occasionally, we’ve found that he goes absolutely nuts, barking, jumping, trying to lick/nibble their ears/faces. We tried having one very dog friendly friend over but he just tackled her so that even she couldn’t handle his enthusiasm. It’s definitely coming from a happy excited place not overt fear or wariness but it means we can’t have him just hanging out when people are over. He will just jump all over them and nothing we can do can keep him away from them. No treats or bribes in the world. We need to keep him behind a gate in that case but he still whines and barks the whole time.

Any ideas for training this? Even our most dog friendly friends aren’t game for withstanding his affections! Maybe getting a trainer to come to the house? In that case though he only gets used to that one person. But what we really intended to do was have a bunch of ppl over when he was a baby but COVID really messed that up!
 

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I've been watching "It's Me or the Dog" with trainer Victoria Stilwell on Amazon Prime. It's from Animal Planet. I have no idea if it's available where you are.

Her method is to put the dog on a leash and when a person comes in, remove the dog each time he gets over-excited. Give him time to calm down, bring him back; if he overreacts, remove him...and so on.

The dogs on TV sometimes take a while to catch on, but reality TV stars that they are, they do learn.
It seems to be working with our poodle, but it's a work in progress.

We're also using her method to stop Normie from barking at people who come to the door.

There are probably lots of other methods to try and I'm sure they will be offered here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've been watching "It's Me or the Dog" with trainer Victoria Stilwell on Amazon Prime. It's from Animal Planet.

Her method is to put the dog on a leash and when a person comes in, remove the dog each time he gets over-excited. Give him time to calm down, bring him back; if he overreacts, remove him...and so on.

The dogs on TV sometimes take a while to catch on, but reality TV stars that they are, they do learn.
It seems to be working with our poodle, but it's a work in progress.

We're also using her method to stop Normie from barking at people who come to the door.

There are probably lots of other methods to try and I'm sure they will be offered here. But if you have Amazon Prime, watching "It's Me or the Dog" will make your dog look well-behaved by comparison.
thanks for the tip! I’ll check it out!
 

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I have had issues with this too. Annie used to be pretty good but a year of pandemic makea guests OMG exciting so we are going back to basics.

this is one method some people like.

I like having a dog on leash during greetings. Excited bouncy dogs don't get to greet, slightly calmer dogs do. If your dog's current state of excitement is a 9, maybe ask for a 7, and pull them off if it ratchets up to an 8. Next time, maybe ask for a 6. Sometimes, that meant that my dog has to wait several minutes before she gets to greet people. Over time, they learn some self control.

I also like to teach explicitly what "off" means. So I practice having my dog jump on cue, then telling them off, rewarding for four feet on the floor. Then once they understand both words, I ask for a jump up (don't reward), ask for an off, reward. Then start multiple rewards for 'off' no reward for jump up. Pretty soon dog a) knows what off means and b) prefers off to up. Then, BEFORE my dog jumps on people I say 'off' and reward them for complying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have had issues with this too. Annie used to be pretty good but a year of pandemic makea guests OMG exciting so we are going back to basics.
Never
this is one method some people like.

I like having a dog on leash during greetings. Excited bouncy dogs don't get to greet, slightly calmer dogs do. If your dog's current state of excitement is a 9, maybe ask for a 7, and pull them off if it ratchets up to an 8. Next time, maybe ask for a 6. Sometimes, that meant that my dog has to wait several minutes before she gets to greet people. Over time, they learn some self control.

I also like to teach explicitly what "off" means. So I practice having my dog jump on cue, then telling them off, rewarding for four feet on the floor. Then once they understand both words, I ask for a jump up (don't reward), ask for an off, reward. Then start multiple rewards for 'off' no reward for jump up. Pretty soon dog a) knows what off means and b) prefers off to up. Then, BEFORE my dog jumps on people I say 'off' and reward them for complying.
Oh great! I'll try those techniques - thanks for the specifics :)
 

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One complication is that you also need to train the guests. I've had a lot of people continue to approach as I wrestle with my bouncing dog. The dog wants to greet the person. The greeting and attention is his reward. He should be denied that reward until he has earned it by waiting politely. The guest should refrain from rewarding my dog by waiting until I say it's ok to approach.
 

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We use a leash. When company comes over, which isn’t often and it’s generally our kids and grandchildren, we clip on the leash. We have a 10 foot one we specifically use for this purpose. We will take it off or keep it on depending upon how relaxed and calm or energetic and bouncy Bobby is. He is very calm when leashed. My goal is for him not to practice poor behavior but we are working towards good behavior while unleashed. I look at the leash as a training aid. It’s a work in progress but at 2 years old, maturity and training are kicking in and his manners are improving when we do have company. I think eventually we will get to the point where we generally won’t need it when company is over. We have two younger grandchildren so it is important for their safety too. Bobby is excellent on the leash and I consider the leash our friend. It helps to keep things calm.
 

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My trainer assured me that my standard parti boy would calm down by the time he was ten. Actually, he didn’t calm down around people until he was eleven, so I definitely sympathize.

She also told me to train my guests, just as cowpony suggested. It was a pain, but when guests came over, I told them beforehand not to talk to him or even look at him until he calmed down. I also put a short leash on him to keep him from jumping. It definitely helped.

My mini boy is almost 7 months and has never once welcomed a guest into our home, so I think once again I am in the same boat.
 

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I taught my dogs a really strong place command. Of course started it at quiet times, gradually increased distractions/difficulty. For example, rolling a soccer ball past, then eventually kicking it, etc.
Then work on it with people around, starting with short visits and place/bed is nearly as far away as possible, barely paid attention to the guest lol but made sure they ignored the dog.
Now I can tell them to place beside me on a bed/mat, when they are calm I might ask the visitor to come say hi or release the dogs from place to say hi and then send them back.
It's a super useful command, especially if kids that are nervous come over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My trainer assured me that my standard parti boy would calm down by the time he was ten. Actually, he didn’t calm down around people until he was eleven, so I definitely sympathize.

She also told me to train my guests, just as cowpony suggested. It was a pain, but when guests came over, I told them beforehand not to talk to him or even look at him until he calmed down. I also put a short leash on him to keep him from jumping. It definitely helped.

My mini boy is almost 7 months and has never once welcomed a guest into our home, so I think once again I am in the same boat.
😂 I think my boy will be the same. Just hope we can someday have people over again😅
 

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I taught my dogs a really strong place command. Of course started it at quiet times, gradually increased distractions/difficulty. For example, rolling a soccer ball past, then eventually kicking it, etc.
Then work on it with people around, starting with short visits and place/bed is nearly as far away as possible, barely paid attention to the guest lol but made sure they ignored the dog.
Now I can tell them to place beside me on a bed/mat, when they are calm I might ask the visitor to come say hi or release the dogs from place to say hi and then send them back.
It's a super useful command, especially if kids that are nervous come over.
Love it. I’ve never taught the place command - I’ve got some learning to do.
 

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What Starvt said! Baby steps to train, rather than cold turkey bring visitors into your home. I like Susan Garrett's suggestion of training by varying duration (how long your dog stays at their place/mat), distance (how close are you when the dog is staying), and distraction (someone walking up the front walk, stepping onto the porch, knocking on the door, entering the door).

 
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