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While I admit it looks amazing, how much of a giant pain is it?

Does anyone do this with their dogs?


:)
 

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It looks like it would be almost as uncomfortable for the dog as mats. Most dogs love a good rub and scratch...doesn't this look preclude that?
 

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I think it is a great pain. For both you and the dog... as cording is basically a form of matting. Basically maintanance on the coat will double as you need to spin each individual lock into a cord on a regular basis.

Here is a video of how to start cording a water dog... she had cut the matted parts into cords, but most people prefer tearing the hair into cords, especially if they do cording for show coats.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WxnvqZ8meY
 

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I don't think it's that uncomfortable for the dog. Yes they're mats but they're very controlled. Komodors and Pulik are corded on their whole bodies and it doesn't seem to affect them much. There is at least one breeder that keeps quite a few of her dogs corded and they look awesome! It looks like a lot of work though and I would personally rather have a soft, fluffy dog.

This breeder keeps some of her dogs corded. If your serious about it, you might contact her for tips.
http://moondancestandardpoodles.piczo.com/ukcgrandchampionmoonvalleymasterslyboots?cr=3&vsrc=search_google&linkvar=000044
 

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I think the difference between cords and being just plain matted is the shape. The cords are thin ropes and assuming it's done properly and maintained properly it shouldn't pull on the skin and irritate it. Matted hair on the other hand is different because the hair clumps together from all different directions and angles and it much larger mass wise than a cord. That would pull on the skin and make it difficult if not impossible to clean. I'm not an expert on cording, not had much experience with it except one puli who I didn't have to groom haha. I don't know how clean a corded coat ever really gets because as I understand it cords can mold and stink if they aren't dried properly, and it's really really hard to dry them. A dog who is just plain matted all over in the traditional sense though really cannot be cleaned at all down to the skin, unless the matting isn't skin tight.
 

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I think it is a great pain. For both you and the dog... as cording is basically a form of matting. Basically maintanance on the coat will double as you need to spin each individual lock into a cord on a regular basis.

Here is a video of how to start cording a water dog... she had cut the matted parts into cords, but most people prefer tearing the hair into cords, especially if they do cording for show coats.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WxnvqZ8meY
I don't normally care for cording, but that's a gorgeous dog.
 

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Holy Moly! The link you put up Tanner is a gorgeous poodle that exemplifies beauty and still has a bit of playful character too. I can't imagine the time that would take, or how the dog is allowed to live from groom to groom. Seems like cording could get easily matted through with one play session.
 

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Holy Moly! The link you put up Tanner is a gorgeous poodle that exemplifies beauty and still has a bit of playful character too. I can't imagine the time that would take, or how the dog is allowed to live from groom to groom. Seems like cording could get easily matted through with one play session.
from what I ahve read(awhile ago) I thought it was to be less maintenance. I jus think the cording process is just the hard part but after that I think it is pretty easy. I could be wrong.....too lazy to look anything up!! lol
 

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the problem with maintaining cords isn't so much the knotting (you spend about the same time keeping the cords split as you would brushing a fluffy coat from what people have told me) it's the fact that if they go running through a bush and get twigs stuck in the cords, there's nothign you can really do about it, cos ya can't brush sticks out, and cutting them if they're higher up the cords isn't exactly an option either!!!!

Apparently they KILL scissors too... lol.
 

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they look like they would smell

and I wouldn't do it to a white dog, only because they look dirtier.

I have been curious about trying it, however im scared to because once its done, theres no turning back LOL
 

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I have always wanted to cord a poodle and someday I will just to say that I did. Here are some of the issues:

1. You have to have a long legged, short backed, elegant poodle to begin with to pull off the trim. The cords hang and draw down the eye and will make an already shortish legged dog look squat. You also have to have a near perfect head and tail because you are not going to be able to sculpt the hair to the dog's advantage. Basically you need to have a really good, specials quality poodle and then you need to put them in a trim that guarantees that the judge will never put them up!

2. I think this looks better on dark Poodles or truly white Poodles. The creams I've seen corded look dingy in cords.

3. Cords are like velcro strips. If you have an outdoor lifestyle, it can be hard to keep debris out of the cords. Unlike a brushed coat, you will not be able to blow and slicker sticks and leaves out of the coat.

4. Cords need to be washed and dried very, very specifically. If they don't dry completely in a certain amount of time, they will mildew from the inside and then they stink to high heaven. I set up at one show next to a group of Puli people. I could barely breath their dogs smelled so bad. It was sort of a combination of wet/dirty dog and sour milk. Shudder......
 

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I set up at one show next to a group of Puli people. I could barely breath their dogs smelled so bad. It was sort of a combination of wet/dirty dog and sour milk.
That sounds really nasty!!!! I had a friend who tried to dread his hair a few years back... he had a really hard time to keep it in dreads, cause if you use any kind of conditioning or moisturizer on the hair the dreads just comes undone. I wonder if this would be the case with poodles as they basically have hair?
So when you wash the hair you don't use any shampoo, just water to keep the hair in cords? Or you would need to use dawn (to strip the coat of it's natural oils - like the video I posted of the water dog being corded)?
 

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Once you get over the initial stage and get the dog in cords,it is actually easy to maintain.
The only thing you have to be super diligent about is the bathing process.
They recommend rinsing with vinegar...possibly the cause of the sour smell.
And the cords have to be completely dry or there can be issues with mildew.
And,of course,once you decide you no longer want the cords,the dog goes 'nekid'.
There is an absolutely stunning silver corded poodle that I run into at the beach and I have talked with the owner in length.
I briefly considered it for Gunther,but being that we live in a relatively humid area,decided against it.
 

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2. I think this looks better on dark Poodles or truly white Poodles. The creams I've seen corded look dingy in cords.
I think a true white like CH Somerset Sweet Success, which was the poodle that made me want to cord, is amazing. My Foxxy is a cream, and yes her cords can look dingy when she gets dirty, and it is amazing how fast that happens. That would be the beauty with black cords, they won't look dingy, but they will bleach from the sun :) You just can't win..
3. Cords are like velcro strips. If you have an outdoor lifestyle, it can be hard to keep debris out of the cords. Unlike a brushed coat, you will not be able to blow and slicker sticks and leaves out of the coat.

4. Cords need to be washed and dried very, very specifically. If they don't dry completely in a certain amount of time, they will mildew from the inside and then they stink to high heaven. I set up at one show next to a group of Puli people. I could barely breath their dogs smelled so bad. It was sort of a combination of wet/dirty dog and sour milk. Shudder......
Foxxy attracts organics from the woods, it is impossible to keep it all out. Cords are very time consuming to wash and dry, Foxxy has to lie down in the bath tub and actually take a bath, she is very good about laying in a bathtub with sudsy water up to her face. Then there is the rinsing, I personally like to wring out the cords after the bath, and that seems to speed up the drying process. The only issue I have had with mildew are the ear cords..when she drinks her ear cords will soak up the water and then stay wet all the time. I am trying to put ACV in her water. I have tried all kinds of bowls, to no avail.
 

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The only issue I have had with mildew are the ear cords..when she drinks her ear cords will soak up the water and then stay wet all the time. I am trying to put ACV in her water. I have tried all kinds of bowls, to no avail.
What about using a water bottle? I have them on my guy's crates and on the puppies pen, so they do not tip water all over.
 

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What about using a water bottle? I have them on my guy's crates and on the puppies pen, so they do not tip water all over.
Oddly enough, I have never even thought of that. Does it take long to teach them to drink from that water bottle ? I would have to figure out where and how to hang them, it would certainly help Foxxy with her "OMD, I have never seen water before and I need to drink the hole bowl, before it vanishes"
 

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Or what about a cup like bowl, where they can only git their muzzle in ?? So the ears don't get wet? I do this with Saffy sometimes so her ears don't get wet lol
 
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