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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so I think my beloved Canyon is an adolescent.....or on his way.

He barks constantly. I remember reading how to teach "shhhh" before "speak" but I think we are way past that point. He barks at the neighbors who take a walk every single morning (although they know him and give him treats) sometimes he barks while chasing them away. He barks at the men doing construction at the neighbors house, delivery trucks, voices on my phone (if I put it on speaker)...almost non-stop. I am looking to see if anyone has any tips or methods to off set so much barking.

Additionally, he is OBSESSED with our trashcan. I keep the pocket door that leads to our kitchen closed and he has figured out how to open it, then open the trashcan. He does this every day, multiple times a day and the minute access to the kitchen is open there he goes scavenging for food.

We have hired an outside dog trainer who will be working with us on his behaviors and he mentioned setting up a booby trap of cans with a string and using video call to watch him in the kitchen, then scaring him. Not sure if this will work, once we get the trainer over I will update you all here to let know what we do and if it works...until then any tips I can try please mention them. I am tired of cleaning up my trash multiple times a day and his non-stop barking waking up my napping toddler.
 

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I put the trash can on the counter until they move past being obsessed with it. Or there are child safety strap locks you could use. Annoying? Yes. Ugly? You betcha! But I will put up with ugly and annoying to keep dogs from rehearsing bad habits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I put the trash can on the counter until they move past being obsessed with it. Or there are child safety strap locks you could use. Annoying? Yes. Ugly? You betcha! But I will put up with ugly and annoying to keep dogs from rehearsing bad habits.
My husband suggested a child safety lock too. Funny, we just got rid of them about 6 months ago cause our toddlers grew past that and now we need to bring them back 🤪
 

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Dogs bark for so many different reasons, and each requires a different approach. If he’s scared of the construction workers, for example, you want to address the fear, which will in turn address the barking.

As for the garbage... Lock it away. No amount of booby trapping, unless it results in injury, is likely to deter him at this point. He’s been rewarded too many times.

We keep all our trash cans in cabinets. The bathroom cabinets don’t need a child lock. The kitchen cabinet absolutely does. But it’s not visible from the outside and isn’t an inconvenience at all. It’s a magnet and just takes the teensiest bit more strength to open. That’s a sufficient deterrent for Peggy.
 

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I agree that you are probably past the point where the booby trap will discourage trash can raiding. Poodles are smart. He will scare himself once. Then he will thoughtfully examine the problem and figure out how to get into the trash despite the trap. Additionally, since you need to use the trash can, having a trap in place will be really inconvenient.

I have different ways of keeping the dogs out of the trash. One trash can is currently barricaded behind an X-pen I wasn't using. I reach over the X-pen when I want to throw something out. A couple others are inside cabinets. The recycling goes into a Simple Human 50 liter trash can with a locking lid.
 

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This is unconventional but the reason I think Tekno doesn't use his voice much even though he comes from a long line of vocal folks is because there's always an alternative to barking. If he wants to go potty, he can ring several bells around the house or hit his "outside" button" If he wants food there's also a bell near the kitchen, and a "food" button. I have a strict "no whimpering" policy in my house. It's grates my nerves soooo much, so all whimpering has been either ignored or met with a swift "AH AH" and then asking him to "use his words" to get him to ask in another way. When he starts barking at exciting things like squirrels, birds, or construction workers I just give a quick shout "COME!" and give him a nice treat and maybe a distraction like a squeaky toy. This has kept the audio peace in the house. I am also very fortunate though that Tekno never lost his baby cry. He cries like a very young puppy when he is lonely or upset instead of barking, so 1. I can tell the difference between nuisance barking and worry, and 2. the baby cry isn't a whimper nor a bark, and is much more quiet than a bark so he doesn't disturb the neighbors. All that is to say, if your dog still has the baby whine installed I support keeping it installed :p :p
 

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Yeah, I keep my garbage under the sink...

Sometime a loud disapproving "Basil..." or "Hey!" can be enough to stop her curious little nose from sniffing where it doesn't belong. Poodles are smart. There are boundaries and they are enforced.

Sometimes it's a signal to take the garbage out or to run a load of laundry too lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Dogs bark for so many different reasons, and each requires a different approach. If he’s scared of the construction workers, for example, you want to address the fear, which will in turn address the barking.

As for the garbage... Lock it away. No amount of booby trapping, unless it results in injury, is likely to deter him at this point. He’s been rewarded too many times.

We keep all our trash cans in cabinets. The bathroom cabinets don’t need a child lock. The kitchen cabinet absolutely does. But it’s not visible from the outside and isn’t an inconvenience at all. It’s a magnet and just takes the teensiest bit more strength to open. That’s a sufficient deterrent for Peggy.
Thats exactly how I feel, he is obsessed to the point where he just wants to constantly hang out in the kitchen and he is a master trash opener! I will look into that magnet, thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is unconventional but the reason I think Tekno doesn't use his voice much even though he comes from a long line of vocal folks is because there's always an alternative to barking. If he wants to go potty, he can ring several bells around the house or hit his "outside" button" If he wants food there's also a bell near the kitchen, and a "food" button. I have a strict "no whimpering" policy in my house. It's grates my nerves soooo much, so all whimpering has been either ignored or met with a swift "AH AH" and then asking him to "use his words" to get him to ask in another way. When he starts barking at exciting things like squirrels, birds, or construction workers I just give a quick shout "COME!" and give him a nice treat and maybe a distraction like a squeaky toy. This has kept the audio peace in the house. I am also very fortunate though that Tekno never lost his baby cry. He cries like a very young puppy when he is lonely or upset instead of barking, so 1. I can tell the difference between nuisance barking and worry, and 2. the baby cry isn't a whimper nor a bark, and is much more quiet than a bark so he doesn't disturb the neighbors. All that is to say, if your dog still has the baby whine installed I support keeping it installed :p :p
At first he never would bark, now he whimpers (when in the cage...almost like this repetitive noise "uh, uh, uh, uh, uh, uh." It sounds like the is hyperventilating. Then the barking, is non-stop from construction workers, to neighbors walking by, to delivery or mail trucks, to birds, squirrels, rabbits.. it is at everything all the time! I will try distracting him. I started doing that on our walks. When I see another dog approaching (if the owner has the leash wrapped around their hand several times) the trainer warned me that this means they have no control over their dog. So when I see such approaching, I will ask him to sit and start feeding him treats as he does the commands I am asking for and I continue this until the dog/owner finish passing by.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree that you are probably past the point where the booby trap will discourage trash can raiding. Poodles are smart. He will scare himself once. Then he will thoughtfully examine the problem and figure out how to get into the trash despite the trap. Additionally, since you need to use the trash can, having a trap in place will be really inconvenient.

I have different ways of keeping the dogs out of the trash. One trash can is currently barricaded behind an X-pen I wasn't using. I reach over the X-pen when I want to throw something out. A couple others are inside cabinets. The recycling goes into a Simple Human 50 liter trash can with a locking lid.
I definitely need to figure out another solution. When the dog trainer mentioned "booby trapping" him, I thought to myself, "that isn't going to work with the determination of my dog!" Canyon doesn't really care what is going on when he gets into that trash, I can catch him red handed and he does not care! The other day, I took a stick of butter out to get soft (for baking cookies) and I thought I set it back far enough on the counter where he couldn't reach it. Then I went to start baking cookies and couldn't find the butter anywhere!!! Well, he got the whole stick and now he is obsessed with butter. I recycle the cardboard boxes they butter sticks come in and often find them ripped to pieces when he can get a hold of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Your post is so relatable, @jessiemarielo . Have you discovered the Adolescent Support Group thread?
Thank you for the rec. I've been reading different things from that page and figured out I definitely am not walking him enough. I saw that it is recommended twice a day for about 40-minutes! Also, more mental stimulation and "sniff" walks! Looks like I have my work cut out for me!
 

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He needs to be in a crate or expen if you don’t have eyes on him, and I’d wager he still needs to be dragging a leash even when he is out so you can easily catch him to redirect unwanted behavior. Eating a whole stick of butter can have devastating consequences, as can getting in the trash can. He can easily eat something that can cause a blockage or pancreatitis, cut his mouth open, perforate his bowel, etc. If you’re finding things after he has taken them or destroyed them, he has entirely too much freedom. Having a 7 month old puppy loose in the house without constant supervision can be like having a 2 year old human loose in the house without constant supervision.
 
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Peggy was still dragging a lightweight leash at that age, when she was supervised. When she wasn’t supervised, she was in her exercise pen or crate.

And we’ve never done two 40-minute walks a day, especially not while she was still growing and easily over-stimulated.

One daily loose-leash sniffy walk or gentle hike, one daily “leg stretch” (e.g. backyard zoomies), a weekly 1-hour play session with carefully selected and supervised doggy pals, multiple short training sessions per day (such as cycling through all her tricks for 2 minutes).... That’s the sort of schedule that kept her content, both physically and mentally.

She would have found multiple long daily walks stressful. Plus, we had no interest in building that level of stamina. Wouldn’t have been sustainable for us.
 

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I haven't tried this, but I saw it on the dog training show "Lucky Dog". When your dog takes an interest in the garbage pail, swipe it all over with a wedge(s) of lemon leaving the scent from the juices on the can. Apparently dogs dislike the scent so much they will avoid contact. It worked for him, but the dog had only just taken an interest, and hadn't "scored" yet. Should be easy to try.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I haven't tried this, but I saw it on the dog training show "Lucky Dog". When your dog takes an interest in the garbage pail, swipe it all over with a wedge(s) of lemon leaving the scent from the juices on the can. Apparently dogs dislike the scent so much they will avoid contact. It worked for him, but the dog had only just taken an interest, and hadn't "scored" yet. Should be easy to try.
Thanks, I'll look into it.
 

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Some general exercise level guidelines for reference

Exercise Guidelines for Puppies (By Puppy Culture) – Inugami – Finnish Spitz
Exercise Guidelines for Puppies (By Puppy Culture) – Inugami – Finnish Spitz

www.inugami.ca

www.inugami.ca

APPROPRIATE EXERCISE
PUPPY FITNESS THAT FITS THE PUPPY Age Appropriate Exercise Guidelines By Jane Killion Director of the film “Puppy Culture - The Critical First 12 Weeks That Can Shape Your Puppy’s Future” THERE'S AN IDEA that’s caught on like wildfire that exercise is some kind panacea that will solve all...
shoppuppyculture.com

Another way to tire any dog out is to "drain the brain" with training, or as the pup will know it, games. A mentally tired pup is just as tired as a physically tired pup, and gets great benefits from it.

Usually recommended is training the steps to qualify for a CGC whether you decide to pursue the title or not.
Canine Good Citizen (CGC) – American Kennel Club (akc.org)
Take the Test – American Kennel Club (akc.org)

Same goes for Trick Dog
AKC Trick Dog – American Kennel Club
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Some general exercise level guidelines for reference

Exercise Guidelines for Puppies (By Puppy Culture) – Inugami – Finnish Spitz
Exercise Guidelines for Puppies (By Puppy Culture) – Inugami – Finnish Spitz

www.inugami.ca

www.inugami.ca

APPROPRIATE EXERCISE
PUPPY FITNESS THAT FITS THE PUPPY Age Appropriate Exercise Guidelines By Jane Killion Director of the film “Puppy Culture - The Critical First 12 Weeks That Can Shape Your Puppy’s Future” THERE'S AN IDEA that’s caught on like wildfire that exercise is some kind panacea that will solve all...
shoppuppyculture.com

Another way to tire any dog out is to "drain the brain" with training, or as the pup will know it, games. A mentally tired pup is just as tired as a physically tired pup, and gets great benefits from it.

Usually recommended is training the steps to qualify for a CGC whether you decide to pursue the title or not.
Canine Good Citizen (CGC) – American Kennel Club (akc.org)
Take the Test – American Kennel Club (akc.org)

Same goes for Trick Dog
AKC Trick Dog – American Kennel Club
Hi, any example Of how to mentally drain my dog?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Just wanted to update everyone, I got training for my dog and he is eating out of the trash as well as stealing food from my daughters way less often. It still happens periodically but it is a major improvement.

What we did was we used an e-collar, that is called "Mini Educator." We set up booie traps around the house (bread with peanut butter)
If my dog went to go eat eat the bread or peanut butter set up randomly a different places we gave him a little buzz.

I was hesitant to use this caller but before we put it on the dog I tried it myself and it all it does is vibrates. It's not a shock or a choke.

I am glad to report that my dog no longer takes food from off the table and periodically tries to go into the trash can but I just give him a verbal sound and he stops.

During this process I made sure to reward him for favorable behavior. My trainer said that the dog can have food as long as it comes from me.
 
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