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Hi everyone, I'm new here but have a problem and hope you guys can help.

I'm the second mom to a beautiful toy poodle. Lexi was 9 months old when I got her 3 months ago and obviously, her other mom didn't know about walking dogs on the sidewalk to shorten the quick in the claws, etc. As a result, my little girl has extremely long claws and as of now, 3 of them have broken completly off, all on her front paws!

I contacted my vet about the first and second one, and she said it wasn't unusual, especially because of the cir***stances and because she's a very active, playful puppy, and, that it would take some time for the quicks to shorten. Obviously, you can only trim slivers off the ends of the claws, so I feel this is going to take forever.

This is the other part of the problem. Lexi is having pain with the 3 broken claws and a fourth that I think is about to come off too. She licks them often and when she does, she licks with such concentration, she wouldn't hear a bomb go off. I give her part of a baby aspirin, but truthfully, I can't tell if it helps. At times, Lexi favors one particular front paw, so I know it bothers her.

There are two other dogs in the house and she wants to play constantly, which aggravates the problem, so I have to limit her time with them. I try to walk her every day but she can't go very far.

From reading some of your posts, I'm wondering if any of you have a "miracle" solution to this situation!

Any advice would be extremely appreciated.
 

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That sounds horrible! And Painful!! Your vet should give her something for the pain at the very least! You'd think there would be something they could do, maybe put her to sleep and cut them all down to a reasonable length. Sounds horrible too, but better than them breaking off. I had a yorkie who got his nail caught in between some deck boards and it broke off, he was in alot of pain. The vet did give him something, but I don't remember what it was. It calmed him down and made him rest till it was better though.
 

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They can't cut them down because the quicks are so elongated. The vet told me it would take quite some time for regular walking on concrete to shorten the quicks. I just wish her previous owner had known about this because I hate it that the puppy is suffering for lack of knowledge on an owner's part.
She's an absolute joy to have and be with, so I want her to have the best quality of life possible.
Thanks for your concern.
 

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Some times if a dog has nails with quick thats way over grown you need to either cut them down yourself or you can call around to local groomer's and see who is willing to do the deed. Either way the dog is in pain and having nails break off isn't the best idea. She could also catch one on something and rip her toe.

That's too bad the lady prior to you let them get that way. If you decide to cut them down yourself do it outside because it will be messy and have the quik stop powder on hand because you will need it. I'd recommend getting a groomer to it so they can be the bad guy. Some dogs don't even react to having it done...other's do.

Good Luck on what ever you decide.
 

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Poor Lexi...Sounds like she may have a biotin deficiency as well too long of nails, since the nails sound as if they are very brittle. Biotin determins nail and hair health. Adding a biotin supplement to diet as a routine for management control and prevention may be slow, but have possitive results. If it were me, I would supplement with biotin not clip, but grind the nails off ALMOST but not into (if possible), to the quick every 4-5 days, driving the quick back up where it should be and promoting a healthy elastic nail growth. You should be able to buy biotin in a powder form. The recommended biotin supplementation for dogs is: 0.15-0.30 (mg/kg) Good health to Lexi.
 

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I definately would not cut them back into the quick either yourself or a groomer. This will be painful and you will end up with a dog that is paw shy. I actually doubt that you'd get more than two or three done before the dog cracked up completely. I am a part time groomer and I wouldn't do it as the dog needs to have a good experience at the groomers and this definately wouldn't be! I have not seen a dog react well to having the quick cut, and the last thing you want is a poodle who's paws are sensitive.

When I was a vet nurse we did anaesthatise (sp?) and cut them back hard in extreme cases, but I assume your vet would have suggested this if she thought it was necessary. They are a bit sore for a day afterwards but it fixes the problem quickly.

Sounds like you will need to just clip a little weekly and continue your walks on concrete, unless you can get a vet to do it.
 

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Where was the break? Can you post a picture?

My mom's Mini has very long toenails do to neglect by the woman we got him from and I take a Dremal and shave them back once a week and they have gotten shorter over time. Once the quick grows out it can take years to get them back to a good length.
 

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I would have to agree that neither you nor a groomer should cut the nails back into the quick. Certainly not with the dog awake! I've had clients ask for this and have refused for obvious reasons. However, a vet can, and I believe should, be willing to sedate your baby, (assuming she has no other medical issues), and cut those nails back for you. I have had dog's sedated when I worked in the vet clinic to have their nails cliped back like that. The dog is out and isn't aware of anything so it shouldn't hurt. In my opinion walking your dog on concrete isn't going to be enough to shorten the nails unless she is really pulling on the lead and digging in with her feet for traction. She needs a bit of a manicure to help things along. Another thing you might try once the nails are clipped is a grinder or a file. You can get them shorter that way without cutting into the blood vessel, if your dog will tolerate the grinder that is. I just purchased a pedi-paws for my shop and I like it for the most part. You might look into one?

-Leia
 

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Ooops....lol. When I have seen that done its been with Amstaffs. They have a high tolerance to pain.....they hardly realize what's going on. I Love those dogs! lol There isn't very much sensitivity afterwards either. Of course you with hold walk's and activities for a few days...etc.

I would personally have something done at the vet or don't let the dog get excitable where the chances of another nail breaking of is in question until this is resolved. Thats hard to do but the dog will be worse off if it rips a toe from the nails in that condition. I would get a 2nd opinion from another vet as putting the dog under shortly to get the nails down to a decent level seems like a great suggestion. Possibly even ask you vet if that can be a option and if not why?

Its sad that you have to deal with someone reglegence (sp). Hope you come up with a resolution soon.
 

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One camping trip and a couple hours exploring on granite rocks and moose's nails were worn all the way back, and we found a couple blood spots on the rocks... is this what you mean by hard surfaces keeping them from growing?

He loves to climb the rocks and at times scrapes his nails to make the climb...

Around the house not so much large rocks or concrete but he loves to run.

SOrry didn't mean to distract, just wondering how you keep the nails `nice` ?

(He is groomed monthly and they clip the nails then too)

-Todd
 

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One camping trip and a couple hours exploring on granite rocks and moose's nails were worn all the way back, and we found a couple blood spots on the rocks... is this what you mean by hard surfaces keeping them from growing?

He loves to climb the rocks and at times scrapes his nails to make the climb...

Around the house not so much large rocks or concrete but he loves to run.

SOrry didn't mean to distract, just wondering how you keep the nails `nice` ?

(He is groomed monthly and they clip the nails then too)

-Todd


I see what you are saying. Really walking a dog on the side walk doesn't help keep the nails short unless the dog already has long nails. If they are kept short on a regular basis they shouldn't even touch the ground while walking unless the are pulling on the leash.

Like your Moose, climbing rocks would definatly grind down the nails as they are grasping onto rocks while climbing. Walking shouldn't do anything UNLESS the nails are already on the long side.
 
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