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Discussion Starter #1
Did any of you have a poodle growing up? I did, and I have such fond memories of Mindy. I used to put her in a tutu, and she would "dance." She jumped through hula hoops and caught frisbee. I think my favorite memory, though, is having her sleep in my room with me.

I'm going to add a few old pics to this thread later.

Does anyone else have memories to share?
 

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Yes - so many memories that still tug at my heart strings :)

Charmaine - female white mini
Tecia - female toy party
Sasha - female black standard

I miss them so...
 

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Popsy and her pups - a white miniature poodle my grandmother bred and gave to us when I was 6 or 7. She had several litters of lovely pups - we used to dress them in dolls' bonnets and take them for walks in our doll's pram ... I'd be horrified now!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes - so many memories that still tug at my heart strings :)

Charmaine - female white mini
Tecia - female toy party
Sasha - female black standard

I miss them so...

I'll take a poodle in each size, thank you very much! I have no pets right now :crying:, and I am going to start with a mini while the kids are young. But the standards are so grand looking, and the toys, so adorable...I think I want one of each!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Popsy and her pups - a white miniature poodle my grandmother bred and gave to us when I was 6 or 7. She had several litters of lovely pups - we used to dress them in dolls' bonnets and take them for walks in our doll's pram ... I'd be horrified now!

Oh, the things I used to do to that poor dog, and she was an angel! She was so good to me!

Speaking of being horrified...it was tragic the way we lost our poodle. We moved, my parents split up and soon after, my mother remarried. (All within about 2 years.) My poor dog didn't know what to do. My stepfather (who has matured a good bit since then) wasn't fond of my poodle. I think he thought she was not a "real dog." She seemed confused, and starting shooting through the door, and running off. One night, when she came home, my stepfather decided to "punish her" by making her "stay out there." (I know, I know...it still breaks my heart.) She never came back. I was 12. HEARTBROKEN!!!! I still dream once in awhile that I find her somewhere; it was a bit traumatic for me!
 

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I'll take a poodle in each size, thank you very much! I have no pets right now :crying:, and I am going to start with a mini while the kids are young. But the standards are so grand looking, and the toys, so adorable...I think I want one of each!
I couldn't agree more. While any or all poodle sizes are a superb choice, my standard Sasha was my heart dog. My mom would only allow poodles for their non-shedding attribute. But little did she know, the poodle would have been my first choice anyway!!! It worked out great :)

I have been following your journey to find your mini. I know it is hard but you will have your dream poodle. I can't wait to meet your future mini...
 

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Growing up, my grandparents had a beautiful cafe-au-lait standard named Coco. He was a small standard; they insisted this intermediate size was called a "knish," which I now realize is a mispronunciation of caniche, which of course just means "poodle" and is not a reference to size at all. LOL. I guess he was a "klein poodle."

Anyway, Coco was an incredibly smart and well behaved dog, and a phenomenal retriever. My grandparents had several lemon trees in their big backyard, and Coco seemed to always have one in his mouth. He would fetch any lemon you threw, always bringing back the exact fruit just thrown, picking it out from many others. (Several times we tested him by marking a lemon, and throwing it into some bushes amidst numerous others; he'd easily pick out the right one every time.)

Grandpa had Coco beautifully trained. He was not allowed to enter a sunken living room area, for example, and never once did in the decade I knew him, even when we mean kids tempted him with treats. Grandpa loved to show off how he could say, "Fetch my slippers", and off Coco would rocket to the bedroom, where he'd find the correct shoes and bring them. Coco would "dance," "sing," and "shake hands" on cue. I also remember being there when he would come home from the groomers, with little bows in his hair, prancing about so obviously proud of himself, you couldn't help but laugh.

Coco was a dearly loved member of our family, and my fond memories of him are one of the main reasons we now have a poodle of our own.
 

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Yes I did, our family had a miniature (silver) male when my twin sister and I were teens. He lived for 14 years, and was one of the smartest dogs I have ever had. He had a soul and a vocabulary of over 100 words.. We literally had to spell in front of him he understood everything practically, LOL Wonderful dog and great companion. His name was Lucky.
 

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My uncle had a black standard poodle named "Mindy Sue." He was a dentist and had his practice in the lower level of his home. He taught Mindy Sue how to open the door to his practice, "tiptoe" quietly on her hind legs and peer into the room to wait for him to shake his head "yes" for her to come in, or "no" for her to scram. He always let her in when either me or my brothers were in the dental chair (other patients would probably have freaked out!).

I loved how she'd come and lay her soft, curly head in my lap while my uncle did all the icky dental work. To this day I know I'd be a much better dental patient if only I could bring my poodle in with me! After Mindy Sue died, my uncle got another beautiful black spoo and named her "Mindy Sue Too." She used to sit in the front passenger seat of the car with him when he drove from NJ to Florida to visit my family. My father used to say the dog probably did most of the driving, she was certainly smart and long-legged enough. (lol!) That spoo could swim like fish and loved to bolt in and out of the ocean all day long. She'd often come out adorned with seaweed. Mindy Sue and Mindy Sue Too were much-loved members of our family. We still talk about them to this day. Thanks for the chance to do so right now!!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I am really enjoying reading these stories. It is easy to see why we love the breed today! There were other poodles in my family, too. My grandparents had a dog named Posey, who was a retired breeding mini. She was a light apricot/creamy color. My great aunt also had a poodle, a little black one named Holly. They were also very sweet dogs. It's funny to me some of the misconceptions people have about this wonderful breed!
 

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I grew up with a black mini poodle too! Mum had her before I was born, but unfortunately she was blind within a few years of her life (and within a year of mine), so I don't ever remember her when she could see so there wasn't a whole lot that we 'did' with her really! She did live to the ripe age of 16 though, so I remember her always 'being there', despite being so totally blind she did live a fine life and moved house with us so many times and did great... Her name was Kiri, so I named my first dog 'after' her; Riki. ;)
 

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I spent most of my childhood with our black toy poodle, Dulcinea, "Dulsa" for short. She was a great dog. She was very attached to my mother but she'd always play fetch with me. Her devotion to my mother was why I wanted my own "velcro dog". Which I got. She lived to be, I think 12.

But I thought you all might enjoy a story about my very FIRST association with a poodle. My great grandmother had 2 apricot toys and one was named Mickey and apparently he had a bad habit and I knew about it, because whenever someone would ask little Me what the doggy's name was, I'd say, proudly:

"That's Mickey-He-Bites."

And he did. Damn dog would walk over me on the sofa, growlign the whole way to get to grammas lap.


After Dulca passed and I was away from home, my parents got a white toy, named Ricky, he is STILL alive at 19 years old. He is blind and has epilepsy but is going strong. He loves the wilds of upper Michigan where he is in retirement with a family member. He was my stepfather's third poodle and when my stepfather died my mom went back to work and didn't want to leave him at home alone for long days. I still can't believe that dog is still going.

My sister had a black miniature, I think he was a "peasant poodle" though, but a really sweet a loving little fat boy named pepper. He wasn't very bright and had the WORST doggy breath, but what a lovey dove he was.

My stepfather had a black toy poodle, before Dulca, she was my first real introduction to the breed. Her name was Suzette. And by the time I met her she was a grand dame elderly soul but my god, she obeyed so fast and so well. She was really a cool dog, and inky jet black until she passed.

20 years have passed since all of that and I waited a long time for my prince to come. And finally he's here and I'm loving it!

Thanks for the chance to reminisce and share!
 

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My grandparents had two miniature poodles - Lulu (white) and Fifi (black) - the names alone will tell you this was back in the fifties! I remember them as being happy, easy going dogs, but there was one famous occasion when the baker called to deliver loaves while my grandparents were out, and walked into the kitchen to put them on the table (no locked doors in those days). Grandparents got back several hours later to find the baker still there, cornered by two fluffy little dogs who had decided he was a dangerous intruder. All the dogs did was growl each time he moved, but he was not going to risk making a dash for the door!
 

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Nearly every single memory I have has a Poodle in it. My Mom bought a white mini named Parade from a puppy mill when I was five. I would dress him and walk around with him in a doll stroller. He was a patient lad and loved the attention. He sparked an interest in Poodles, and my brother, at about twelve, delivered for a drug store on his bicycle for 10 cents an hour and bought my Mom her first black Standard named Pixie. Pixie got distemper when going to the vets for her shot. My Dad then helped Mom get Penny from the same breeder as Pixie (By-Jo Poodles) and the owner, Joan Byam, and my Mom became best friends for life. Mom was also bit then by the bug.

Penny was bred and produced Jester (Cherod's Rebel Jester), who became our first champion. My Grandparents, who I adored and who played a huge role in my life owned Jester's litter brother Sibonne, so when I was at Grandma and Grandpa's home, there was yet another black Spoo in my world. Our next Spoo was Bibelot's Samantha Bewitched who won her championship in a flash, and won the best brood bitch class at the William Penn Futurity iin Pennsylvania over all three sizes. That was a moment I will never forget. Mom and Susan Fraser of Bibelot had been friends and ring competitors from time too time, but their friendship grew ever stronger. We boarded a lot of dogs for Susan, one being Bibelots Mind Your Manners, who stayed with us for a few years, and who was the joy of our hearts. A chronic clown, we taught him to sneeze on command, wipe his nose, smile, and yawn. At the same time as this source of entertainment was with us, we acquired Samantha's cousin Hi Crowns Wayward Girl (Sarina), and she was the female version of Manners. Her nick name was Wiggle Bum because she did not just wag her tail, rather her entire bum would wiggle so hard it was as if she might propel her back end right off the ground and fly away like a Poodle helicopter.

We also had the pleasure of living with Ch. Wentworth Andrew, who was a prissy little fellow who was all show dog, and not a lot of fun in the house, but a joy in the ring. One of the pups born in our home was Cherod's That's My Number (Bingo) who I got to help champion. Bingo died of side effects of Pyometria at about six years of age and I suffered from a horribly broken heart. Another of our puppies was Bibelot's Funtastic of Cherod, who was bred to a top winning white boy, Bibelot's Clean As A Whistle (Suds) and we got a litter of eight whites and one black. I bought one of the white males out of that litter, who I named Bosco, and who I planned to breed and show, but who, along with several other Spoos and cats died in a house fire in my Mom's home. A tragedy beyond measure.

Some of the names I fondly remember are Parade, Pixie, Penny, Jester, Sarina, Bingo, Funny, Andy, Manners, Heidi, Dusty, Charity, Bosco, Ace, Miranda, Becky, Belinda, Missy, Thinker, Joy, Paris, Mache. Bless their souls. They got me interested in this breed at a time when I could have been getting into a ton of trouble, but for a time my energies were so focused on loving them, grooming them, showing them...that is why I am doing what I am today. This breed has been an enormous part of my life for over 47 years, and will continue to be until the day I die. And I am proud to say that so many of my childhood memories included Poodles, I feel as if they run through my blood.
 

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Arreau,

Wow, what an amazing story. I am so sorry to hear about all the poodles you lost, but was also amazed at how many you've known and loved. This forum is an amazing place to bring those of us with the same passion together!

I cannot imagine losing my dear boy in a fire. I think it would kill me. How did you survive?
 

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Arreau:
Lovely story and thanks for sharing. I especially like the last sentence of the poodles running through your blood, this is really a nice reference.
I know how much you love your four legged kids. Color of your reds is beautiful from what I have seen in photos.
 

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Arreau,

Wow, what an amazing story. I am so sorry to hear about all the poodles you lost, but was also amazed at how many you've known and loved. This forum is an amazing place to bring those of us with the same passion together!

I cannot imagine losing my dear boy in a fire. I think it would kill me. How did you survive?
Experiencing a house fire is likely one of the most terrifying things anyone could ever go through. Even once you KNOW everyone is safely out of the house your mind plays tricks on you and you keep wondering if you just imagined they were safe. Everytime you close your eyes for the next few weeks, you see flames and think, think, think if there was anything you could have or should have done differently.

So much is going on in your head and there is so much to deal with re: insurance companies, where you are going to take a bath, figuring out where you are going to live, etc., that it thankfully kept us sort of preoccupied so we did not have time to dwell on the animals being gone. Because of where the dogs were when the fire started, there was no possible way we could have done anything differently, and knowing that helped a lot. If there had been a way to get them and we had not, we would never have forgiven ourselves. We were also incredibly blessed, in that the firefighters came came the next day with a man with a hi-ho, and they removed all of the bodies and buried them so we would not have to see them. This was not part of their job, they kindly did it to spare us having to go through that. We had my baby just shy of a year old, my toddler son, my Mom and two young sisters and I all going through the same grief, loss, homelessness, and terror, so while we all helped each other cope, our minds were kept very busy, which helped us all immensely. Our grief for the pets came weeks after, when things had calmed down considerably and we were settled to some degree. Then we just cried, reminisced and grieved until our hearts healed. And made sure we thanked God often that there was no loss of human life, because the way it happened, there certainly could have been.

I have been blessed to have had these glorious creatures be such a huge part of my world for as far back as my memory serves me.
 

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Arreau, wow oh wow!! Woman, you were born "to poodle" (why can't "poodle" be a verb? poodles can do anything!). The sorrows you've endured and the joys you've had and continue to have in "poodling" (again, should be a real word!) knock me out. Loved reading your story!!
 

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Arreau, wow oh wow!! Woman, you were born "to poodle" (why can't "poodle" be a verb? poodles can do anything!). The sorrows you've endured and the joys you've had and continue to have in "poodling" (again, should be a real word!) knock me out. Loved reading your story!!
I have likely got a million stories I could share with you all, but it would take forever. Every once in a while an opportunity comes up to share a bit of my story with you and I love it. It takes me back and mostly makes me smile.

I will tell you a quick story that happened when we went to the Purina National show in Toronto this Spring. It is amazing what a big small community Poodles are. When I was a child, one of the prettiest ladies in Poodles was Phyllis Laventhal, who is now Phyllis Wolfish. She bred toys under the Ma Griffe prefix. I was entering the show, and this beautiful, graceful, elegant older woman stamped my hand, and I said to her "Are you Phyllis Wolfish?" and she replied "Yes, I am. Who would you be?" and I told her I used to be Cherie Ambeault, and that my Mom was Gloria Kyle. She began to cry and said "May I hug you dear? I thought the world of your Mother, and am so terribly sorry about her passing". It took me a few moments to recover.

Then not an hour later, we were walking through the grooming area, and I stopped to speak to one of the handlers, whose Mom was friends with my Mom for years. I could feel a woman behind the handler staring at me, and I kept thinking I knew her, and I finally said "Are you Elaine Whitney?" and she said yes,( she is the handler's Mom) and as soon as I told her who I was she said she could not believe how much I look like my Mom did back in the day and that she felt something so familiar when she was looking at me. Elaine and her husband Bob are both all breed judges, and she is assisting me in getting Quincy registered in Canada, telling me all I need to do, which paperwork to fill out, who to send it to. All these years later, to go to a dog show and see some of the old crowd still there grooming, exhibiting, judging, and now most of us little scamps who ran around causing havoc years ago are stepping into their shoes. It was an enlightening and wonderful experience.
 
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