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Miss Pixie is too much! I’ve been working on leave it and today outside she was really getting the hang of it with lots of rewards. So she would pick up a leaf to eat, I’d say leave it and she’d drop and I’d give her some treat. Repeat endlessly.....

BUT that cheeky puppy would do the cycle then go search for leaves to purposely pick up and look at me and drop without my comment for her treat ha ha! She also would go search out the previous one to repeat it. She is too much!

She’s also been nipping me hard when we play she will run behind me and bite my back. I was reaching around and taking her off which I’m sure she thought was a game as she did it more and harder every time. I read about making a loud yelp like she hurt me and stopping and I did it twice during a play session and she looked at me so quizzically and stopped. Long may that continue!
 

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If I picks up the same leaf will I gets a treat? If I picks up a different leaf, will I gets a treat? Sound like a poodle!

With the nipping, I found that a loud yelp followed by an absolute time out where I was no longer visible, worked fast with Noelle during her shark phase. This only works inside, though, where you can leave the dog in the kitchen and go somewhere completely out of sight for 30 seconds or so. That really got Noelle's attention and she learned not to bite me.
 

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I was wondering if you were teaching Miss Pixie to pick up leaves with this technique. At the very least you have made leaves a very valuable item by training "leave it" too long with leaves. Continue the "leave it" training but vary the items you want her to leave, and vary where you train - both inside and out of the house.
 

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They are such little snots aren't they? Well Pixie trained you well to get her to pick up leaves pretty quickly, so do as Skylar suggests and now work on generalizing the leave it to be about things other than leaves and in places other than the yard. Have fun trying to stay more than one step ahead of your clever little girl.
 

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I remember Lily CD RE once saying something along the lines of you can drill with other breeds, just not a Poodle. Your Pixie darling just showed us a real life embodiment of that lesson :). What an adorable story and girlie you have, and a smart one, too! True to form Poodle.
 

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Instead of teaching “leave it” I’ve used Susan Garrett’s It’s Your Choice game.
It teaches a dog impulse control and also to respect that you control access to everything. After all, you can’t be around 24x7 to monitor your dog. Plus every time a dog gets a command it’s reinforcing, even a command to not do something has a payoff: your attention, the primary reward a dog is seeking all the time.

It’s Your Choice establishes your ownership of any object, the dog must wait for you to give it or not give it.
And dogs understand the concept instinctually. When the IYC game is taught you’ll see the light bulb go off, the dog backs away from the object & learns quickly to wait for it. Also IYC, unlike many lessons, is generalized easily because it’s already in the dog’s nature.

After training IYC I’ve added a word that is useful: Mine. Mine means not yours ever. Her toys are hers & my shoes are mine, her dinner is hers & and my dinner...

Leaves could also be mine I guess. But with “leaves” a “leave it” is definitely cuter, lol.

Here’s a link to Susan Garrett’s IYC game which she gives away free since it’s the foundational game for everything else she teaches.
http://dogsthatlisten.com/tim/

 

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Well Renn is 9 months old , today in fact..I remember those days . He now has a solid "live it" so nice to take a walk and him not grabbing anything he can find. Still happens occasionally but he has a could leave it and or drop it now. We just repeated this over and over while we walked and it eventually stuck. The biting..well my guys would draw blood. Of course being older my skin is getting thinner but those shark teeth would just snag my skin. I looked abused for awhile. We did the yelp and then a firm no. No was and is a good command in this house. He knows its means to stop whatever he is doing. Pixie sounds like a very smart girl. It all takes time...
 

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Streetcar thank you for remembering that discussion about "drills." You can drill dogs like border collies* (who will be "saying please make me do that again, I must have something to do" over and over and...) and golden retrievers* and labs* (who will be saying "oh yeah sure I'll do that again because I am a dufuss and don't know any better"). Poodles will say okay the first to third or fourth time you ask for something and then either they blow you off if they don't care to please you, but that being rare since they generally do really want to please after which they say to themselves well I must have been wrong those other times so I will do this thing a little differently to get it right and now your perfect sit at heel turns into something crooked, forged, lagged or maybe even devolves into a down. Doditwo It's Yer Choice is a wonderful game to teach since it is so adaptable to many many situations. Here is a link to a video I made with Javelin doing advanced IYC with tons of distractions. My goal was to have him ignoring all of the dogs and people moving around near an area at my training club that he had decided he owned.





*No insult to lovers of those breeds intended. They just aren't for me.
 
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