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Hello, I’m new to the forum but have read quite a bit on here. Interested in possibly getting a Standard Poodle from Charleton Standards in Peoria, AZ. Does anyone have experience with this breeder? If not, do you see anything on the website (Home) that I should be concerned about? I appreciate your help!
 

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The site doesn't have huge amounts of information. I'm ok with that; a good breeder will want to chat with prospective buyers. The sire is exceptionally large. I spotted some test results for him online, but I didn't hunt up anything for the dams. It might be worth asking the breeder for test results etc.
 

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I agree with cowpony. My general impression is good but guarded given the lack of information. I tried to find evidence to support their claims...

I did find Sir Stryder listed on pawprint genetics but not on OFA which definitely means I'd ask for his hip test results. I didn't find anything on the dams either. I have confirmed some of the names of the adults as "Charleton Black Opra Emmy" and "Sir Phantom Titan Stryder The First" and "Charleton Red Hot Tequila Rose" and "Charleton Hot Pepper Penelope." Something odd... if you search Emmy's name on google it comes up on pawprint genetics but when you try to access it says the page was removed. So My guess is that her results have been removed from pawprint genetics. Why? I don't know.

On the AKC search, only 11 dogs come up under the Charleton name. Which is a bit odd to me if they register all of their puppies. They say they only sell AKC registered puppies. My own dog's breeder name search turns up 30 dogs, which I would expect as more typical for a breeder who has at least a few litters under their belt. Not necessarily a red flag, as they may be listed as something other than the Charleton name. But I do find it a bit odd as I expected to see more dogs.

Ideally the parents would have some titles to prove their structure and temperaments. Either conformation or performance like obedience, rally, or agility. Even canine good citizen titles are reassuring. I see one of their registered puppies has a CGC title but nothing other than that. The photos of their dogs don't enable me to judge structure, but I do suspect some of their dogs may have poor angulation. A proper stacked photo would be necessary to truly look at them.

Bottom line: If you can confirm they have completed the OFA minimum recommended health testing, they seem like a decent breeder of pet quality dogs. I would for sure not feel comfortable unless their hips have been tested either through OFA or Pennhip. I don't know the prices they charge. I think dogs from top show/performance titled lines typically price at $2-2.5k for standards (though standards aren't my specialty so I could be slightly off). But that should give you something to compare to.

OFA minimum tests to meet CHIC certification are the following...

 

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Discussion Starter #4
You all are awesome, thank you for your help in researching this breeder! I did receive a copy of the Paw Print Genetics certificate and it appears they are both normal/clear of:

Degenerative Myelopathy
GM2 Gangliosidosis
Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures
Osteochondrodysplasia
Progressive Retinal Atrophy, Progressive Rod-Cone Degeneration
Von Willebrand Disease

The breeder does not have OFA testing CHIC certification for either adult. Not sure if I should proceed. Breeder was willing to speak over the phone for over an hour discussing her breeding & puppies. That made me more comfortable, and she was willing to provide references.
 

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You all are awesome, thank you for your help in researching this breeder! I did receive a copy of the Paw Print Genetics certificate and it appears they are both normal/clear of:

Degenerative Myelopathy
GM2 Gangliosidosis
Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures
Osteochondrodysplasia
Progressive Retinal Atrophy, Progressive Rod-Cone Degeneration
Von Willebrand Disease

The breeder does not have OFA testing CHIC certification for either adult. Not sure if I should proceed. Breeder was willing to speak over the phone for over an hour discussing her breeding & puppies. That made me more comfortable, and she was willing to provide references.
This is just me speaking personally, though my bet is that many of our experienced forum members would feel the same.

I would not purchase a standard poodle puppy that did not have hip tests completed on the parents. I have seen too many dogs go through terrible pain and expensive (we're talking $5k per hip) surgery to feel alright taking a chance with dogs that don't have multiple generations of health testing to make me feel confident that they will live long pain-free lives.

The genetic testing is good, but it is not enough. For large dogs, it is considered quite irresponsible to breed without hip tests. It bothers me that Charleton states "have had all the health testing done to ensure a good gene pool" because it seems deliberately misleading considering they haven't even done the minimum recommended tests.

I honestly don't know enough about other health issues in standards to say the importance of eye tests, but the hip tests are a red flag for me. It's a shame because they seem to be trying to do a good job with puppies based on the limited info on their site.

Standard poodles are the easiest of the three poodle varieties to locate breeders with availability, and my guess is that you won't be too limited on options if you choose to look elsewhere.

Whatever you decide, please continue to participate in our community as you welcome your new family member.

@Rose n Poos has an excellent list of her suggested breeder qualities. I know it's in one of the stickied threads.
 

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Hi and Welcome!

As mentioned, here's my checklist. My criteria need not be yours but I think it's important for a potential poodle owner to understand why these criteria are important to choosing a conscientious breeder and to get a wellbred puppy to share life with for many years to come.

My Personal Breeder Requirements

My ideal breeder is someone who is doing this because they love the breed. They want to see each new generation born at least as good as the previous, ideally better. They provide for every dog in their care as if that dog is their own. They will be there for the new family, and stand behind that pup for it's lifetime, rain or shine, with or without a contract. They will know the standards and pedigrees of their chosen breed, health and genetic diversity of their lines, and breed to better them. They will know of the latest studies in health standards for their chosen breed and variety.
They will have as many questions for me as I do for them. They invest in their dogs. They don't expect the dogs to support them.

Breeding Program
! to maintain, improve, strengthen the breed
by breeding to standard, for health and genetic diversity,
and will prove their dogs meet these standards by showing or competing
or by breeding from titled parents. It's not the title, but what it shows
! focus is on quality, never quantity
! they do not cross breed
! they limit breeding to one to two breeds
! they limit breeding to only a few litters per year

Breeding Parents
! registry information available
AKC Registry Lookup
! not too old or young for breeding
! not overbred
see Asking questions from a breeder
and Frequency of Breeding a Bitch
! genetic health testing done appropriate to breed and variety
! other health testing by exam such as annual eye, hips, patellas
! results of testing on own website, OFA site or testing lab
see Health Related Publications - Versatility In Poodles, Inc.
and OFA Lookup https://www.ofa.org/look-up-a-dog

Living Conditions
! in home with family
! breeder allows, even encourages home visits

Puppies
! routine and urgent vet care, immunizations, dewormings
! socialization
! first groomings
! registry papers
! they will not require spay/neuter before physical maturity
! health "guarantee" generally favors the breeder, not the buyer.
health guarantee is no replacement for health testing of dam and sire.
beginning housetraining is a bonus
temperament testing is helpful

Advertising
! individual website to detail history of breeder, goals for their program
! information on dams, sires, puppies
! no trend pricing for color, gender or size,
! no marketing gimmick terms like "teacup" "royal"

! Anything not found on the website should be provided by breeder before buying.

If a breeder wants me to believe that they believe in their dogs, they won't stop the investment when it comes time to find the new families. If they want to cut costs by using free advertising sites like craigslist or listing on retail marketplaces like puppyspot or puppyfind, or other classified ad sites such as newspapers, I wonder what else they've cut costs on.

Contact a few breeders to introduce yourself. Even if they don't have or don't offer what you're looking for, it can be a close knit community. They may know where to refer you.

Happy Puppy Hunting!
 

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Hello, so I heard from one of my pup owners and another soon to be that my kennel is being decused. I'm charletonstandardsaz.com As to answering the question completly and fully for all I didn't get the Ofa done at 2 yrs old but I have litters out there with NONE having any problems of any kind. As to the the testing, I don't know if all the new people understand what a dog has to go through to get it it done and that you have to find the right vet that really knows what they are doing. Anyone is more than welcome to call me as she has said I have no problem talking and have educated many on this breed. I have pups that are 3 1/2 yrs old and still there isn't any problems. As for the hips, I take my dogs in to see the vet yearly and they have no problmes. In fact my phantom sir, 85 pounds Stryder, you see on my website just started jumping 2 1/2 feet hurtles this year as he I guess was tired of watching the girls do it. It was amazing. He just went in for his yearly and is doing fabulous.

Now as to the OFA testing, well if you get a vet you don't know to do the test they might not do the best on it. I found out from one breader that happen to her but she was smart enough to ask to see the xrays. They refused at first and she told them they'd never get paid unless she saw them. They were horable. They didn't even have her sir fully on the table. She told them they needed to redue them as she wasn't paying for that. Now understand this test is not at all comfortable for a dog and it has to be sedated to be pinned right. They finally redid it with her in the room at that point and the ofa test was sent in and it came back good. There are 4 rankings with OFC for this; Excellent, Good, Fair, and poor. Now that doesn't mean that it's 100% or even 75% sure that the pups he/she produce won't have hip problems but it's something to go by. Also, the age of the parents that don't have it done you should look at them. Like on my website it shows not just pictures but a video of the parents playing hard and in no way in any pain or discomfort. My dogs when not breeding go hiking big time with me and in fact my girls were with me when we ran into a cougar last summer. The #1 thing to do for the best dog is pay attention to what you do with them. You can cause you dog to have health problems if you don't understand and do your research. I tell all my new pup owners they are apart of my family and anytime they can call or text me even if the pup, now dog, is 10 yrs old. I want to know how everyone is doing. I've got pups out there all over the USA and keep in contact with them. Some of my pup parents have come back after a year or longer and got a second one from the same parents. My dogs mean the world to me. I can't wait until you get your pup Jlc as then you'll really know how much I put into them. I do far more raising the pups than most breaders do. I have no problem explaing that either if anyone wants to know but I think this is long enough. REMEMBER EDUCATION IS KEY TO ALL THINGS. Don't judge things that are of science unless you've educated yourself. Have a wonderful day all
 

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Thanks for popping in, Rose. :) I loved watching the video of Stryder and Emmy. My favourite part was when Emmy hopped carefully up and over one of the nosy puppies, right in the middle of an energetic play session. What a sweet, careful girl.
 

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Thanks for popping in, Rose. :) I loved watching the video of Stryder and Emmy. My favourite part was when Emmy hopped carefully up and over one of the nosy puppies, right in the middle of an energetic play session. What a sweet, careful girl.
Thank you. She definitely is and a great momma. Not too protective but very much into her pups. Those reds ones aren’t hers though. She will get down and play great with them. Sleep well and see you around ✨
 

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This is just me speaking personally, though my bet is that many of our experienced forum members would feel the same.

I would not purchase a standard poodle puppy that did not have hip tests completed on the parents. I have seen too many dogs go through terrible pain and expensive (we're talking $5k per hip) surgery to feel alright taking a chance with dogs that don't have multiple generations of health testing to make me feel confident that they will live long pain-free lives.

The genetic testing is good, but it is not enough. For large dogs, it is considered quite irresponsible to breed without hip tests. It bothers me that Charleton states "have had all the health testing done to ensure a good gene pool" because it seems deliberately misleading considering they haven't even done the minimum recommended tests.

I honestly don't know enough about other health issues in standards to say the importance of eye tests, but the hip tests are a red flag for me. It's a shame because they seem to be trying to do a good job with puppies based on the limited info on their site.

Standard poodles are the easiest of the three poodle varieties to locate breeders with availability, and my guess is that you won't be too limited on options if you choose to look elsewhere.

Whatever you decide, please continue to participate in our community as you welcome your new family member.

@Rose n Poos has an excellent list of her suggested breeder qualities. I know it's in one of the stickied threads.
She is getting one from me and has met the parents 🙂 I’m Charletonstandardsaz
 

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She is getting one from me and has met the parents 🙂 I’m Charletonstandardsaz
Yes, I see your response. Though I think we all appreciate your input, I can assure you that any evaluation I give comes with the maximum amount of research. I am a biologist myself and try to keep very up to date on dog health, so I am quite acquainted with science and limitations of health testing. Though it doesn't guarantee health of puppies, research very readily shows the benefits. The Poodle Club of America has made recommendations for best breeding practices regarding health testing, and I will always recommend that buyers look for breeders that follow recommended health-conscious breeding practices. That said, buyers are free to make their own decisions that are right for them. I wish the OP many happy healthy years with their puppy.
 
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