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Our little guy has no issue being at home alone - though he does sit by the window waiting for our car to pull into the driveway :)

We have taken him to a few hotels, but have never left him in the room alone for 2 reasons - we do not want to disturb other guests and, we are concerned someone will open the door and either steal him, or accidentally let him out. He is not crate trained.

I was reading that CBD oil would be a good way to keep him a bit subdued while we're out of the room. We can't take him everywhere, though we have been lucky at hotels that allowed us to bring him nearly everywhere.

Has anyone tried it? Dosage for an 8lb tpoo?

We have a reservation at a beach resort and in all likelihood, we would leave him during the afternoon and also to go out to dinner, so we may have to dose him twice.

I really don't want to give him Benadryl, which is what our vet suggested when we took him on a plane. It worked, but he was droopy for a bit afterwards.

We are working with our neighbor to get him used to staying with her. She has 2 dogs and watches others in her home, so she's experienced. We left him for 8 hours, and the poor little guy did nothing but sit on the couch and stare out our house, which is directly across the street. I want to work on an overnight stay next.

Any other ideas?
 

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I will be interested in responses to this as well. Both of my dogs show signs of anxiety (mostly separation anxiety). I was given some free treats containing CBD oil from a local pet store, but I was just too nervous to try them and decided to throw them out.
 

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I don't think I would go to using CBD or hemp with a puppy. I would work on training the pup to be used to being left in a crate with some happy safe chews and a comfy toy. If you start with drugging a puppy you have no place left to go if that stops working or doesn't work in the first place.


If you want to relieve anxiety then don't leave the pup in an anxious state for 8 hours. You have to take baby steps. Put pup in crate and if you see 8 relaxed seconds reward that. Take your time and work up to a minute, three minutes, 8 minutes and so forth. No rushing this.


I would never in a million years leave my poodles in a hotel room on their own for any longer than the time to go get a plate of food from the free breakfast and bring it back to my room to eat it or to move something into or out of may car. Both of my poodles are very seasoned travelers, but it is so hard to find good hotels that accept dogs I never risk ruining it for other people or for myself in the future. I am not sure that your beach vacation plans are fair to your pup, to yourself in worrying what is happening while you are gone or to other guests. You might need to rethink that schedule.


ETA: I do use CBD oil for noise anxiety to good effect, but on adult dogs, not pups. I think you have to make sure you are careful about high quality of the product and that it is titrated as to the dose and such.
 

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We have traveled quite extensively thru Canada & Alaska using hotels, one of the rules at every hotel was that our dog was not allowed to be left alone in the hotel room.
 

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We have traveled quite extensively thru Canada & Alaska using hotels, one of the rules at every hotel was that our dog was not allowed to be left alone in the hotel room.

That is true at most hotels in the US too. The continued ability to travel with dogs does really depend heavily on those of us who do so having model travel companions. Our travel was pretty limited for the first year or two of Lily and Peeves young lives: budget minded places to stay that were well known pet friendly chains; one person always in the room with them; getting take out meals or only traveling when cool enough for them to be in the car if we wanted a table service meal. When we go to Indianapolis every May none of the dogs comes with us.


I do travel a lot with my poodles, mostly to obedience/rally trials, but I did take a long road trip with them to Georgia (from Long Island) in 2017 for the AKC rally nationals with Lily. I tailored the entire trip to knowing there were things to do where they could be with me all along and passed over some things I would have enjoyed but that they would have had to stay in the car for (didn't want to take a chance of having it be too hot to do so safely).


mary2e I don't think anyone here wants to be a buzzkill on your vacation plans or even the idea that you want to travel with your pup, but I would think about making plans to board him for this trip. This year for our Indy trip I left Javelin with a new dog sitter recommended by a dear friend. He was too much for my mom last year since she doesn't have a fenced yard and we don't leave the three of them at our home because all of them are too much to manage for people who don't know them well. The dog sitter told me he cried like a baby the first night and when he got up the next morning and went out in the yard and trotted around with her husband he decided he liked them and had a really nice time going out for car rides with the husband and going for leisure walks with the wife. We had a good trip and for Javelin it was like his own little vacation. He can go back any time we need to leave him, he enjoyed and was well mannered with the people he stayed with. That says a lot since normally he is with me 24/7 (truly since he comes to work with me).
 

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When I used to keep dogs, I never had one that seemed homesick for it's owner for more than one day. Most of them looked sad until the owner was out of sight. The dogs always had a human with them, and seemed to thrive in a new, exciting environment. I even used to let the owners have free practice stays so that their dog (and the humans) would be more comfortable when it was time for their longer vacation. The dogs were much more comfortable than they would have been if they had been left alone in a hotel room. Also, some states have laws against leaving your dog alone in a hotel room. When we were bringing our pups home (cross country), we also had our two service dogs. One horrible night there was a Yorkie in the next room that barked all night long. At about three in the morning, my daughter was ready to go get the Yorkie to have it spend the night with our four, very silent (and annoyed) dogs. There were a lot of disgusted doggy sighs coming from our dogs that night.
 

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I agree - if your pup cannot be with you 24/7 on your trip you are much better boarding him. Poppy is an absolute wuss about being left, even with Sophy (who is perfectly happy to stay with anyone who gives her chicken!). When I had to leave them for a week a kind friend agreed to board them, and I made frequent visits to her house first so that it was familiar to them. Poppy mithered for a few hours when I was gone, but settled so well that it took her a while to notice me on my return!

I am not sure I would choose a place so close to home, though - my concern would be that the dog would be constantly aware that home (and in his mind family) were just across the street, and would try to escape to get back there.
 
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Mary2e...Personally I would not take the puppy with me. I think it would cause anxiety for you both. Perhaps you can find a pet sitter to either keep him at their home or yours. I would definitely work on crate training him. My dog goes into his crate whenever I go to bed or leave the house. He always gets a little snack and he immediately settles down and sleeps until I open the crate door where he will take a big stretch and come out when released. Now he didn't love it at first but I did it from day 1, in you go out to potty in you go. He didn't get freedom until he earned freedom and then there are just times I need a break. Even though my standard is 18 months he might chew or steal if let unattended. Also he has some anxiety if I go away from him and he is free in the house but he doesn't have any when in his crate. When he was a year old he tried to protest that he no longer liked his crate and would stop and try not to go in. I gave him nicer treats and a treat ball and just went about a week of his protesting when he smartened up that it wasn't going to work so he may as well just settle down. He now even stays quite when I first come in the room in the morning. I have some older dogs that must go out before him so he waits quietly for the most part until its his turn. The crate is so handy, I know if I go visit a relative and that they are gracious enough to allow me to bring him I can put him in his crate and he will be fine and they don't have to worry about having a dog run through their home. In a hotel you will always be anxious what if someone comes in the room what if he is crying, what if he sneaks out. And many beaches don't allow dogs not hem in peak months .
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thank you.

I don't think I would go to using CBD or hemp with a puppy. I would work on training the pup to be used to being left in a crate with some happy safe chews and a comfy toy. If you start with drugging a puppy you have no place left to go if that stops working or doesn't work in the first place.

If you want to relieve anxiety then don't leave the pup in an anxious state for 8 hours. You have to take baby steps. Put pup in crate and if you see 8 relaxed seconds reward that. Take your time and work up to a minute, three minutes, 8 minutes and so forth. No rushing this.
He is 20 months and will be 21 months when we go. We have tried to get him used to a crate or his carrier and he will have nothing of it. We tried the food, we tried the treats, we tried praise. But we should try it again.

I should add that he CAME crate trained. That's where he was sleeping, and then he slept on the floor. We lost power for 3 nights in the dead of winter and had to put him in our bed (he was only 5 months at the time) and that was the end of sleeping on the floor, and forget about the crate. He now starts out in bed and then goes down to his own bed on the floor after an hour or so.

I don't think he's anxious. I think he wants to be with us. When we're out of the house he sits in the window waiting for us. Ditto with the neighbors house. The only place he doesn't look for us is when he's with my dad. But my dad is 89 (in very good health), but has trouble bending - and there's a lot of bending involved with a dog. He will keep him, but my concern is if he has to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night (and sometimes he does) he'll wake dad and have to go downstairs to the pad in the garage. I really don't want dad doing that over night.

I would never in a million years leave my poodles in a hotel room on their own for any longer than the time to go get a plate of food from the free breakfast and bring it back to my room to eat it or to move something into or out of may car. Both of my poodles are very seasoned travelers, but it is so hard to find good hotels that accept dogs I never risk ruining it for other people or for myself in the future. I am not sure that your beach vacation plans are fair to your pup, to yourself in worrying what is happening while you are gone or to other guests. You might need to rethink that schedule.
I've had no issue with hotels not wanting him. I've been put in suites off the pet floors, and allowed to bring him even when the hotel does not accept pets. He's so little that one look at him, and my assurance that we are carrying cleaning supplies, gets him in. He has never messed in a hotel room. We put down a pad in the bathroom, show it to him, and that's what he uses.

However, my big concern is ruining for others. I know of one hotel in Atlantic City that was extremely pet friendly (they could go everywhere but the casino floor & restaurants) and they had to stop allowing pets because so many people broke those rules. I'm meticulous about knowing and following them. I will add that if I have the opportunity to see a member of the hotel management team, or even someone at the front desk, I thank them for allowing him in the hotel and tell them he behaved himself :)

ETA: I do use CBD oil for noise anxiety to good effect, but on adult dogs, not pups. I think you have to make sure you are careful about high quality of the product and that it is titrated as to the dose and such.
Thank goodness we don't have a noise or fireworks issue. We use a white noise machine to generate thunderstorm and rain and beach sounds. He's heard them since we brought him home. We had a nasty thunderstorm yesterday and he slept through it. Twice. He did open his eyes once and then went back to sleep. For fireworks, we took him to disney and had a room right near the lagoon where they shoot off fireworks - for 15 minutes every night. For the first 3 nights we shoved a treat in his mouth and played/praised him while they were going on. By the 4th night, we brought him to the beach area to watch and he did calmly.

I'm hesitant about the CBD oil for all the reasons mentioned. I don't want to overuse and diminish the effect in the event I need to use it, but I also don't want him barking.

Perhaps the best solution would be to leave him with my neighbor for 1 night and see how he does. Then we can just drop him off for 2 nights later on if he does well.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Mary2e...Personally I would not take the puppy with me. I think it would cause anxiety for you both. Perhaps you can find a pet sitter to either keep him at their home or yours. I would definitely work on crate training him. My dog goes into his crate whenever I go to bed or leave the house. He always gets a little snack and he immediately settles down and sleeps until I open the crate door where he will take a big stretch and come out when released. Now he didn't love it at first but I did it from day 1, in you go out to potty in you go. He didn't get freedom until he earned freedom and then there are just times I need a break. Even though my standard is 18 months he might chew or steal if let unattended. Also he has some anxiety if I go away from him and he is free in the house but he doesn't have any when in his crate. When he was a year old he tried to protest that he no longer liked his crate and would stop and try not to go in. I gave him nicer treats and a treat ball and just went about a week of his protesting when he smartened up that it wasn't going to work so he may as well just settle down. He now even stays quite when I first come in the room in the morning. I have some older dogs that must go out before him so he waits quietly for the most part until its his turn. The crate is so handy, I know if I go visit a relative and that they are gracious enough to allow me to bring him I can put him in his crate and he will be fine and they don't have to worry about having a dog run through their home. In a hotel you will always be anxious what if someone comes in the room what if he is crying, what if he sneaks out. And many beaches don't allow dogs not hem in peak months .
Thank you.

If you can believe it, we have left him unattended in the house almost from day 1. We tried putting him in a doggy play pen and I thought he would kill himself trying to get out.

So we let him have run of the house. And he behaved himself. He used his pad for the bathroom and never chewed on anything. No furniture, no shoes, nothing. I still can't believe it. When I tell people THEY don't believe it. Yes, he had accidents, and we did have to block off the second floor until he got the message that the carpeting was not a pad (there is no carpet on the first floor) but that only took a week. I am very, very grateful to the breeder for starting his training, and for breeding such a well behaved poodle :)

I think I will just leave him with my neighbor. She watches 1 dog at a time in her home (she has 2 of her own) and has a lot of experience with handling dogs that want to go home. The down side is that she is directly across the street and he watches the house all day long waiting for us.
 

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The couple who watched Javelin in May also only watch one dog at a time and after the first night he really settled in with them. I bet your pup will settle in after you first leave him and will give up on staring longingly across to your home. I think you will find this a much more enjoyable vacation this way. Although I always miss our dogs when we are away it is easier to know they are safe at home. Our dog sitters always send text messages to let us know they are okay and the woman who watched Javelin sent plenty of pictures of him too.


You can plan ahead for next year to find a dog friendly vacation spot that allows dogs on the beach and maybe even has some sort of dog sitting included.
 
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Having a trusted neighbor, friend, or relative watch your dogs when you are gone is always nice. We used to have a very nice and experienced lady who came to my family's house to watch our dogs, but she has since passed away. We tried boarding our dogs at daycare/boarding facilities after that, but in my area those facilities were a disappointment (very loud for one thing), and we always came back early from our vacations because we were worried about our dogs. Now we don't go anywhere as a family anymore, because I don't know yet who I would call on to watch Jasper and Miracle.

I think having your dog in a home of a trusted person is always better. Sounds like your pup is well adjusted will be just fine :)
 

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Thanks everyone. We decided to leave him with my neighbor. She's available, and we'll start leaving him there more often for a few hours at a time so he can become more accustomed to it.

However, my husband has already started having separation anxiety :)
 

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Ah what a sweet man your husband is!
 
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Here is a good example of the dose for smaller dogs...make sure you find a CBD/hemp oil that is standardized and get a recommendation from the manufacturer on the dose for their strength of product. I do not know this company so cannot vouch for their product.

https://www.allthebestpetcare.com/pet-nutrition/cbd-dose-dog-cat/

In humans, CBD oil usually has a more potent effect than hemp oil. This is usually because 100% of the THC cannot be stripped out of the CBD oil and the THC activates the CBD a bit more. The hemp oil will not contain any THC.

I would recommend starting with hemp oil and then proceed to CBD if the hemp oil does not work.
 

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I'm glad you're using a pup sitter. I think it's a wise decision. When you travel with your dog, you can learn the hard way some not so fun things about your destination & dogs. I spent hours getting hideous burs out of my Shih Tzu's coat, BUGS & varmints, & at the ocean you have to watch out for loose dogs (that are not supposed to be off lead) & dogs that don't know not to drink out of the ocean. It can really suck the fun out of vacation.

I just wanted to chime up about the CBD oil. I do use it with my dogs however not puppies. It would take something extreme emergency before I would use it on a puppy. I've had some vets advise that people be VERY cautious in that you need to purchase quality CBD Oil that is formulated for dogs (not humans). I know of some dogs who have died from marijuana toxicity. I've been told that this is impossible but I'll trust the vets' info. The vets gain nothing by sharing the info with me. But CBD Oil formulated for dogs that I get is from Hempworx 250 strength for dogs & it's bacon flavored.Both our Chi's will volunteer to take this even when they are terrified. They're still scared of the storm but they can lay in our laps or on the bed without Boo hiding in the interior of our couch or under the bed & poor Tinkerbell doesn't shake until she's exhausted.
 

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Good quality CBD is derived from low THC level industrial hemp plants not Cannabis sativa cultivars that are grown for medical or recreational marijuana uses. I cannot imagine that any quality CBD could cause a fatal toxicity. Even serious pothead humans don't die from too much marijuana use.



That said good quality of CBD is important not just so it is safe, but also so it is effective. There are many brands of CBD that work well for companion animals including, for larger dogs, preparations for humans (which is what I give my dogs who weigh 100, 50 and 37 pounds). Although I don't love FB I strongly recommend this group for people doing research on brands and uses for CBD. https://www.facebook.com/groups/171965680275046/
 
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I agree with you on how it should be made but as (where I am) we're seeing the stuff being sold at gas stations, I don't hold out for hope of quality of these. I simply know what the vets told me, as it was their patients. There's also the issue of allergic reaction, sensitivity, etc.. which I thought to ask them after I'd spoken with them about it. (I'm great that way... think of things to ask after the person is gone). Any human or animal can have a sensitivity or allergic reaction to basically any substance. So I was left to wonder if the CBD was actually too strong for the individuals or did they actually have an allergic response? Or did they have underlying health issues that lead to the death & it was triggered by a response to the CBD? If I ever get to speak with the vet again, I will ask more questions & he'll indulge me because he's known me forever. I err on the side of caution & after hearing that, I always recommend what they told me. I have a couple of very tiny Chihuahuas so it'll always be dog strength for them.
 

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I am an immunologist so I certainly do know that any person or other animal can have an atopic response to virtually anything. Having a severe allergic reaction to something is very different from overdosing from it though. After all an anaphylactic reaction to a bee sting can kill a person, tiny dose is life threatening. The dogs that you referred to with severe adverse reactions could have had them as responses to non-cannabadiol components of what they were given or might have died coincidentally from other pathologies.

Nope I sure wouldn't buy CBD at a gas station of a vape shop either, but for larger dogs if you do know the dose that works for your dog then using a human formulated CBD is fine (I wouldn't do that for tiny dogs).

I think we agree on nearly all of this dogsavvy.
 
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