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Discussion Starter #1
Hiya guys!

I just wanted your guys' advice!

I have booked Bumble in to be neutered on the 3rd of September, he will be nearly 13 months old then! The reason I have done this is because he has begun to get humpy/trying to dominate due to his hormone levels. I asked for advice from my vet and he said that he would be happy castrating him after he is a year old so that he is sexually mature and his growth plates have closed.

However, I have one concern: and it is that, when on the lead, Bumble can be nervous and barky when a dog approaches him due to the fact that he has been attacked whilst on the lead. He is perfectly fine whilst off the lead, and he is also perfectly fine when on the lead around LOTS of other dogs – it's more when we are in a really quiet place and another dog suddenly appears.

A main reason why I want to get him castrated is because I don't want other intact males to continue to have a problem with him and attack him.

Do you think that castration will fix his on-lead issues or worsen them? I have a training session booked for next week to test this. It was an issue that was fixed before with training – but it returned when he had a surge of hormones and such as he got older. It's not that big of a problem as it is, but I just don't want it to worsen due to castration.

Thank you in advance!
 

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Castration won't fix the on-leash problem; training will. You will notice after he is neutered he will be less of a target for other neutered males, and the humping will die down too. Neutered males are much easier to live with, generally speaking. I don't think I could live with an intact male.
 

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Castration won't fix the on-leash problem; training will. You will notice after he is neutered he will be less of a target for other neutered males, and the humping will die down too. Neutered males are much easier to live with, generally speaking. I don't think I could live with an intact male.
Thank you very much! I was simply worried that getting him castrated will make it worse as sometimes I've heard that castration can make a problem worse. We're going to work with a trainer to fix the leash problem and make him happier on the leash anyways! :act-up:
 

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... Neutered males are much easier to live with, generally speaking. I don't think I could live with an intact male.
Interesting observation, zooeysmom. But that is not my experience. My boy Sam is intact at 4 years old and you couldn't ask for a poodle that was easier to live with. He has a fabulous mellow temperament and he is great around other dogs and people. Occasionally (very occasionally), he will try to hump a dog at the park. And then of course, I snap a leash on him. But I actually had more of a problem with Bob humping other dogs (he especially liked golden retrievers) than with Sam. Bob was neutered at 6 months by his first owner.
 

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My Renn is much the same. Most times he is very good but lately he is tarting to get a bit jumpy and wanting to go up to every dog but is unsure and will bark. oct of my neighbors have pretty small dogs and though they are willing to let their dog up to him I am not comfortable as when he eps on my foot it hurts and I actually think my toe had a stress fracture. I just talked to my vet yesterday and we feel he is getting more mature, he also now wants to sniff everything when we walk as a week ago he really didn't care. He is still only 8 1/3 months so we re holding off his neuter. I am contacting a new trainer this week to work with us. While the other is quite good she works only outdoors and I want a bit more than the class she is offering.
 

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Training is the only fix for the on leash behaviors. You will want to do lots of counter conditioning and look at that (LAT) training to reduce the on leash reactivity. Neutering will reduce the humping and such. I personally have no problem with intact males. We have two. Our girl is spayed.
 
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Interesting observation, zooeysmom. But that is not my experience. My boy Sam is intact at 4 years old and you couldn't ask for a poodle that was easier to live with. He has a fabulous mellow temperament and he is great around other dogs and people. Occasionally (very occasionally), he will try to hump a dog at the park. And then of course, I snap a leash on him. But I actually had more of a problem with Bob humping other dogs (he especially liked golden retrievers) than with Sam. Bob was neutered at 6 months by his first owner.
Before Frosty was neutered at 15 mos., he started marking indoors, being the target of neutered males, and being more aggressive to any dog who just wanted to sniff him. For those reasons, he (and our other males before him) has been easier to live with after being neutered. He has never humped.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you so much for your advice, everyone!

I forgot to mention that he has begun to (i'm not sure what it's called) lip 'chatter' (?) around female dogs and follow them relentlessly. He's also begun to get his 'lipstick' out at almost any moment. He's also marking wherever we go where other dogs have been – he marked three times in a pet shop today, and in the vets last week – something he's never done before.

The main reason I want to get him castrated, though, is because of other intact males attacking him. We are going to meet with a trainer to work with the on-leash stuff, but I'm hoping the castration will make him more focused towards me: which is something that poodle owners where I live have said happens!

:act-up::act-up::act-up:
 

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Before Frosty was neutered at 15 mos., he started marking indoors, being the target of neutered males, and being more aggressive to any dog who just wanted to sniff him. For those reasons, he (and our other males before him) has been easier to live with after being neutered. He has never humped.
Do you find that Frosty was much better after neutering? I'm hoping Bumble will simply be more focused on me when we're out – he seems a lot more distracted recently with his hormones. :act-up:
 

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My Renn is much the same. Most times he is very good but lately he is tarting to get a bit jumpy and wanting to go up to every dog but is unsure and will bark. oct of my neighbors have pretty small dogs and though they are willing to let their dog up to him I am not comfortable as when he eps on my foot it hurts and I actually think my toe had a stress fracture. I just talked to my vet yesterday and we feel he is getting more mature, he also now wants to sniff everything when we walk as a week ago he really didn't care. He is still only 8 1/3 months so we re holding off his neuter. I am contacting a new trainer this week to work with us. While the other is quite good she works only outdoors and I want a bit more than the class she is offering.
I have seen A LOT of people in Poodle groups that have the same problems with their young dogs – I think it is a wavering factor with adolescence and fear periods! It's the only problem we've ever had with Bumble, and it's a thing that has been fixed before but came back with his sexual maturity! It only took us one training session to get to the bottom of it before!
 

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It seems odd to me that other intact males are the dogs you have problems with. Be aware that neutered male dogs will often be aggressive with intact males. Lip chattering is an expression of stress/over excitement. The behaviors that are problematic for you other than the leash reactivity should resolve after Bumble is desexed.
 

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Do you find that Frosty was much better after neutering? I'm hoping Bumble will simply be more focused on me when we're out – he seems a lot more distracted recently with his hormones. :act-up:
Yes! He was like a different dog overnight. Much more focused, a little calmer. He did that chattering thing constantly when he was intact and now he only does it once in a blue moon when he is turned on by a really pretty female (usually Maizie LOL).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It seems odd to me that other intact males are the dogs you have problems with. Be aware that neutered male dogs will often be aggressive with intact males. Lip chattering is an expression of stress/over excitement. The behaviors that are problematic for you other than the leash reactivity should resolve after Bumble is desexed.
Thank you so much! Ah, okay! He has been attacked by a Weimaraner, Boxer and GSP of whom I knew were in tact – but he has been told off by a neutered Dalmatian before. I'll try to keep aware of body language whether it be with an in tact male or not :)

Also, do you have any opinions/advice on chemical castration/implant and whether I should perhaps have that done to see the effects before going for the permanent surgical castration?
 

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There is one member here, JudyD whose dog Blue had some of the same behavioral issues as Bumble. They tried the zeutering with no relief from the problems. You might try searching for her posts about the whole thing. I don't recall details, but do recall that there was fairly extensive discussion.
 
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