Poodle Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m going to pick up my toy poodle puppy at 18 weeks (4 months). I’ll have a week off but then I have school. I’m not sure how long can I leave him alone at home for? He will be potty trained so that won’t be a problem. I’ll have to leave at 8 and I’ll come back at 4. Would it be possible to leave him alone for that long. I have seen a lot of videos explaining that it is okay to take 3-4 days off when taking the puppy home and then leave him/her alone but I’m not sure how much of it is true. I have a lot of friends who own dogs and they can leave him/her alone for a long period of time but I don’t think that applies to a puppy. Does anyone have any tips or ideas? Can I leave him alone for that long? What did you do with your dog? I just really want the best for Luca.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Would it be possible for someone to take him out for a potty break in the middle of that time? 8 hours is a long time to expect a puppy to hold it. My Standard Poodle is 15 weeks and goes out every 3 hours or when he indicates he needs to go out. He will hold it a little longer in his crate but I do still get up in the middle of the night to take him out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Would it be possible for someone to take him out for a potty break in the middle of that time? 8 hours is a long time to expect a puppy to hold it. My Standard Poodle is 15 weeks and goes out every 3 hours or when he indicates he needs to go out. He will hold it a little longer in his crate but I do still get up in the middle of the night to take him out.
He will have puppy pads which he hopefully will do his business on. I’m just worried about leaving him alone as he will still be a pup.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,155 Posts
A puppy won't have bladder control until he is around 6 months or more, so reckon on him using the pads for some months. And pups of that age really need to be on four meals a day, unless you plan on free feeding. Eight hours is a very long time to leave a young puppy alone - their brains are developing and they need company, comfort and education. Adults adapt better to their humans' timetables, although even they often don't like to be alone all day. I would look for a puppy sitter or similar, either someone who will look after him during the day for you, or someone to call in at least once while you are out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A puppy won't have bladder control until he is around 6 months or more, so reckon on him using the pads for some months. And pups of that age really need to be on four meals a day, unless you plan on free feeding. Eight hours is a very long time to leave a young puppy alone - their brains are developing and they need company, comfort and education. Adults adapt better to their humans' timetables, although even they often don't like to be alone all day. I would look for a puppy sitter or similar, either someone who will look after him during the day for you, or someone to call in at least once while you are out.
Yeah I think I can ask our neighbor to come by. (She also has a dog so she will know what to do) Our breeder is currently feeding him 3 times a day and we will probably carry on with that. And later on switch to two.
 

·
Premium Member
Standard poodle; African Grey Parrot
Joined
·
118 Posts
I would leave Rhonda alone for hours when she was only 2.5 months. Today, she expects me to be gone a while during the day. I just "puppy-proofed" the place and had toilet facilities for her. She doesn't bark, cry or get destructive. I think once a routine is established, they are okay with it. Of course, it all depends on the dog. I have always free-fed her, so food is not a problem. And, when I do get home she expects my undivided attention for a few hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would leave Rhonda alone for hours when she was only 2.5 months. Today, she expects me to be gone a while during the day. I just "puppy-proofed" the place and had toilet facilities for her. She doesn't bark, cry or get destructive. I think once a routine is established, they are okay with it. Of course, it all depends on the dog. I have always free-fed her, so food is not a problem. And, when I do get home she expects my undivided attention for a few hours.
I’m glad to hear it is possible. I think I can consider free feeding until we switch to two meals a day.
 

·
Registered
Bentley - 6; Willow - 6; Mia - 3; Jasper - 3
Joined
·
231 Posts
He should be fine. Many people have puppies and work outside the home. I would prepare a small puppy proof space for him. Like an x-pen. Give him a potty area in there too. Don't expect him to hold his bladder for that length of time yet.
 
  • Like
Reactions: toypoodle_lover

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,069 Posts
If you can find someone trustworthy to come do a mid-day visit, I would highly recommend that. 8 hours is a LONG time for any dog to be left alone. I don't think mine have ever been left that long--probably 5-6 hours tops on a few occasions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
He should be fine. Many people have puppies and work outside the home. I would prepare a small puppy proof space for him. Like an x-pen. Give him a potty area in there too. Don't expect him to hold his bladder for that length of time yet.
Yeah, I have an x-pen ready for him. Should I cover the entire area of the x-pen with parts or only a part?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you can find someone trustworthy to come do a mid-day visit, I would highly recommend that. 8 hours is a LONG time for any dog to be left alone. I don't think mine have ever been left that long--probably 5-6 hours tops on a few occasions.
There are a few people I can ask. And all of them have dogs so I know I can trust them
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,285 Posts
Even if his breeder has made a good start on housebreaking, it's not biologically possible for most 4 month old puppies to be fully housebroken. They simply don't have the bladder size and control yet.

I know a lot of people use pee pads to line crates and x-pens. I had poor experiences the few times I tried it. The puppy would playfully shred the pad, and I would then have to clean up both the urine soaked floor and also the bits of shredded pad. I had better luck using a durable washable bottom layer such as a whelping pad or waterproof picnic blanket underneath the x-pen. I provided the puppy with a crate to sleep in and a toilet pan in the x-pen.
 

·
Registered
Luca red tpoo and Matteo blue Spoo
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
If I remember correctly, your Luca is a toy poodle. Toy poodle's can suffer from hypoglycaemia. It's very important to make sure he gets enough to eat, so his blood sugar level doesn't drop alarmingly. We free feed our dogs and especially our Luca, who also is a toy poodle, always has access to food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you everyone. I might just end up taking a few more days off. There will be someone in the house 3 days a week with him but that person won’t be home on the week that I have to start school. I’ll probably free feed him and find someone to come by on the days that he is alone 8 hours. Thank you again
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,179 Posts
I'm reiterating.

It will be several months before your toy puppy's bladder will have matured enough to recognize the physical need to void, physically attempt to hold it, and be able to do so without accidents.

The bladder size is quite small and since food and water must be available for Luca's health, he will need to have an appropriate and separate place, away from toys, bed, and food to pee and poop.

Something like this as an idea. A barrier of some kind to define the "bathroom" and hopefully contain any spread.
Handwriting Rectangle Gesture Font Pattern


I wouldn't recommend free-feeding until he's older. Three-four meals a day are designed to keep his metabolism on an even spread thru the day. Switching to two meals after he's mature is a possibility but not all will do well on that. You'll need to see how he matures.

Leaving the pup alone for so many hours is far from ideal. As the others have said, this is a very formative time for Luca and to learn the human world, there needs to be humans around. He will have been used to the people, other dogs, and activity at the breeders then only a few days after bringing him home you'll basically need to leave him completely alone for a large portion of his day.

Mine are miniatures and I would never have left them alone for that long at that age. I don't even do it now for more than a few hours unless there is an emergency. This is not only for their physical health but for their mental health, too.

Puppies can't raise themselves but if left to themselves, poodles especially, will make up their own games and rules. He may decide to eat the peepads. That is very dangerous. Would you leave toys for him? Those can be dangerous. Knocks his water over? Poops in his food?

It's necessary for you to think of him as an infant, still very much relying on his humans to look after him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I’m going to pick up my toy poodle puppy at 18 weeks (4 months). I’ll have a week off but then I have school. I’m not sure how long can I leave him alone at home for? He will be potty trained so that won’t be a problem. I’ll have to leave at 8 and I’ll come back at 4. Would it be possible to leave him alone for that long. I have seen a lot of videos explaining that it is okay to take 3-4 days off when taking the puppy home and then leave him/her alone but I’m not sure how much of it is true. I have a lot of friends who own dogs and they can leave him/her alone for a long period of time but I don’t think that applies to a puppy. Does anyone have any tips or ideas? Can I leave him alone for that long? What did you do with your dog? I just really want the best for Luca.
In my opinion, after having 7 poodles in my lifetime and seeing others with the same. Under idea conditions you should't leave puppies alone for that long. However, we all aren't retired and have a life that we want to share with an animall, and they will survive. Each will act differently through it, but they generally get the picture and survive. Make sure they have newspapers or puupy pads to relieve themselves, food, water and so of the security toys of choice. (preferably a conditioned environment, no severe heat or cold) Having radio or a TV on close by also helps with the abandonment issues. They evendually become a wonderful pet that's shares "your" schedual quite well.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top