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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After missing it last year, our annual anniversary camping trip in May will be Peggy’s first ever. I’m a little nervous! I really wanted her to have some camping experience by now.

To those of you who camp with your poodles, any tips for life on a campsite?

This is a bustling campground, which has gotten twice as busy thanks to covid. There will likely be adults, children, dogs, and wildlife within seeing or hearing distance at all times. I’m hoping we can fit Peggy’s crate in the tent, but my husband is skeptical. Does your poodle alert you to noises at night or settle in quietly?
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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Can you camp in your backyard to practice? Mia and Zulu both took time to settle in. The first night was usually rough, but they improved over subsequent nights. We didn't camp often enough for them to get sufficiently comfortable that they skipped the adjustment period.
 

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I’m hoping we can fit Peggy’s crate in the tent, but my husband is skeptical. Does your poodle alert you to noises at night or settle in quietly?
Tonka slept inside the tent with no crate. And just me, so lot's of room. lol
I carried one of those screw-in spikes to hook his flexi on so he had freedom of movement and a choice of shade, sun and water at all times. [But then, we had all kinds of room wherever we stopped.]
In the wild or in a friend's back yard, I never heard any 'alert' from him. He slept soundly through the night.

Here he is chilling with a buddy in Halifax.
475390
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Can you camp in your backyard to practice? Mia and Zulu both took time to settle in. The first night was usually rough, but they improved over subsequent nights. We didn't camp often enough for them to get sufficiently comfortable that they skipped the adjustment period.
That’s what my husband suggested. And he volunteered to be the one to camp in our backyard with her. (Thank goodness. It’s very spidery.)

I just wonder if it might leave her more confused than anything. She is serious about her evening routine here. Do not get between the poodle and her bedtime.
 

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Annie has been camping since she was 5 months old. She is pretty good about being quiet once we are in the tent. She barked a few times at frogs in the night on her second camping trip, but since then, nothing - even when there was a coyote making a rucus 30 ft from the tent, she just lookedat me like 'you gonna protect me, human?'. Sigh.

In a busy campsite, I would suggest bringing tarps to string up and block Peggy's view of other campsites. I once did this for Annie. She barked a few times, but the dogs one campsite over who were barking at us every time we moved were the big problem, as Annie barked back! So I used the tarps to block their dogs view of us, which helped a lot, and made Annie feel more secure (usually we back country camp). Annie does bark at things moving in the dark, which is helped by giving her her own headlamp attached to her collar or putting her to bed in her 'safe' tent.

Annie likes to eat in the tent, which is a big no no in bear country, but she finds it hard to settle and feel safe unless in a tent.

I would set up the tent in the backyard and just practice comfort in a tent - do crate games like teaching a dog about crates, and let her explore in a familiar environment.
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Tonka slept inside the tent with no crate. And just me, so lot's of room. lol
I carried one of those screw-in spikes to hook his flexi on so he had freedom of movement and a choice of shade, sun and water at all times. [But then, we had all kinds of room wherever we stopped.]
In the wild or in a friend's back yard, I never heard any 'alert' from him. He slept soundly through the night.

Here he is chilling with a buddy in Halifax. View attachment 475390
Thank you! I forgot we had one of those spiral stakes. We’ve never had reason to use it.

My last girl used to patrol the campsite for chipmunks. It was bittersweet her last year, when a chipmunk literally went right between her legs and under her belly, and she didn’t even notice.
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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That’s what my husband suggested. And he volunteered to be the one to camp in our backyard with her. (Thank goodness. It’s very spidery.)

I just wonder if it might leave her more confused than anything. She is serious about her evening routine here. Do not get between the poodle and her bedtime.
Set up the tent and see how it goes? When we glamped in the backyard, Zulu would participate in the setting up, then go indoors at his self appointed bed time, and when he realized I was staying outdoors, he would come back out. He once gave the most polite "woof" I've ever heard as a way of knocking on the front door of the tent. Mia, OTOH, never left my side. Since I took glamping seriously, the three of us would snuggle on the inflatable queen sized mattress, with ample blankets. They spent the first night barking at owls and all of us were groggy the next day. The second night they were too tired to bark.
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Annie has been camping since she was 5 months old. She is pretty good about being quiet once we are in the tent. She barked a few times at frogs in the night on her second camping trip, but since then, nothing - even when there was a coyote making a rucus 30 ft from the tent, she just lookedat me like 'you gonna protect me, human?'. Sigh.

In a busy campsite, I would suggest bringing tarps to string up and block Peggy's view of other campsites. I once did this for Annie. She barked a few times, but the dogs one campsite over who were barking at us every time we moved were the big problem, as Annie barked back! So I used the tarps to block their dogs view of us, which helped a lot, and made Annie feel more secure (usually we back country camp). Annie does bark at things moving in the dark, which is helped by giving her her own headlamp attached to her collar or putting her to bed in her 'safe' tent.

Annie likes to eat in the tent, which is a big no no in bear country, but she finds it hard to settle and feel safe unless in a tent.

I would set up the tent in the backyard and just practice comfort in a tent - do crate games like teaching a dog about crates, and let her explore in a familiar environment.
This is all really helpful. Thank you! We’ll arm ourselves with an extra tarp and some good lighting options. And I like the thought of introducing her to the tent in advance. Even if we don’t actually sleep in the backyard, she can learn to see it as an extension of home and familiarize herself with the sounds and smells. I’m sure she’ll also be very interested when I start sorting through and organizing the rest of our supplies.

I considered choosing somewhere more remote for this first trip, but I think there’s something to be said for going somewhere we know really well. Peggy always looks to us for cues, and if we’re comfortable, she’s more likely to be comfortable.

Plus, it’s pretty spectacular:

475392


(And we can see a bit of Canada from our campsite. :))
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Set up the tent and see how it goes? When we glamped in the backyard, Zulu would participate in the setting up, then go indoors at his self appointed bed time, and when he realized I was staying outdoors, he would come back out. He once gave the most polite "woof" I've ever heard as a way of knocking on the front door of the tent. Mia, OTOH, never left my side. Since I took glamping seriously, the three of us would snuggle on the inflatable queen sized mattress, with ample blankets. They spent the first night barking at owls and all of us were groggy the next day. The second night they were too tired to bark.
Aw. That little woof sounds adorable. :) We’ll get the tent set up next weekend maybe. It could probably use a little airing out anyway. I’m sure Peggy will shadow my husband’s every move. Not much happens around here without a poodle supervising.
 

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Bobby wasn’t a year old yet when we brought him camping as Covid shut that down as we all know. When we did bring him camping he slept in the tent with no crate. We used cots so we just set up his spot between our cots. He was really good. He settled right in and was very content in the tent with us. We brought his blankets from home so it smelled right to him. No issues whatsoever with sleeping. Maybe a couple “boofs” if he heard something but he was super good at stopping when we let him know all was good.
I suppose a lot depends upon the campground though and how close the sites are. The campground we go to is fairly busy but the sites are well spaced.
We kept him tethered at all times outside the tent. We hope to get back to camping this year.
475393
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bobby wasn’t a year old yet when we brought him camping as Covid shut that down as we all know. When we did bring him camping he slept in the tent with no crate. We used cots so we just set up his spot between our cots. He was really good. He settled right in and was very content in the tent with us. We brought his blankets from home so it smelled right to him. No issues whatsoever with sleeping. Maybe a couple “boofs” if he heard something but he was super good at stopping when we let him know all was good.
I suppose a lot depends upon the campground though and how close the sites are. The campground we go to is fairly busy but the sites are well spaced.
We kept him tethered at all times outside the tent. We hope to get back to camping this year. View attachment 475393
That looks so cozy!
 

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Not a poodle, but deacon LOVES the lake! He is dog reactive, and very nervous in public, but because our camp site is pretty secluded, he doesn't notice everybody around us. Plus he LOVES the extra attention from family.

We sleep in campers though. I bring his crate just in case but he usually sleeps loose with me in the bed.

for tie out cables I string his leash between two trees and attach another leash to that. It doesn't get tangled and he can walk around.

475404
 

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We camped together when he was just 13 weeks old. He is 11 now and has always loved it. Since I am too old and stiff now to actually set up a tent and get in and out and up off the ground, we are sleeping in the car. Unfortunately it is getting harder for him to jump in and out . I have a 4x4 SUV which is pretty high off the ground.
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
We camped together when he was just 13 weeks old. He is 11 now and has always loved it. Since I am too old and stiff now to actually set up a tent and get in and out and up off the ground, we are sleeping in the car. Unfortunately it is getting harder for him to jump in and out . I have a 4x4 SUV which is pretty high off the ground.
I’d really hoped she’d have lots of camping experience under her belt by now. We were waiting for fall, hoping the covid crowds would clear out, and they just never did. What a strange year. :(

Maybe you could add a sturdy step stool to your set-up, so your boy will have an easier time. My mom needed one for their new truck. My dad devised a system so she could pull it up into the truck after her. Lol.
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Not a poodle, but deacon LOVES the lake! He is dog reactive, and very nervous in public, but because our camp site is pretty secluded, he doesn't notice everybody around us. Plus he LOVES the extra attention from family.

We sleep in campers though. I bring his crate just in case but he usually sleeps loose with me in the bed.

for tie out cables I string his leash between two trees and attach another leash to that. It doesn't get tangled and he can walk around.

View attachment 475404
That’s a happy Deacon! I so wish we had a trailer. That’s how I camped for much of my childhood and it’s such a luxury compared to tent camping. Maybe someday. :)

I like your tie-out idea.
 

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That’s a happy Deacon! I so wish we had a trailer. That’s how I camped for much of my childhood and it’s such a luxury compared to tent camping. Maybe someday. :)

I like your tie-out idea.
we wont do tent camping anymore after 10 years of doing it. So many hot days, leaky tents, no bathroom, etc. Just last year we bought a hybrid camper. Its hard sided, but the end of the camper pulls out for beds, its like a pop up. You can google hybrid camper for an idea. :)
 
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I’d really hoped she’d have lots of camping experience under her belt by now. We were waiting for fall, hoping the covid crowds would clear out, and they just never did. What a strange year. :(
Which part of the country do you live in? We live in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. There are many National Forests, as well as state, and so we go boondocking in the woods and fields on public land instead of in official campgrounds. That way we went a lot last fall and avoided the crowds. Now Since it is still not very warm up here I am planning to have us go out to the Southwwest and do the same thing. There, not only do they have National and State forests, but BLM (Bureau of Land Management) also. It is very easy to camp away from others.

I bet your Pup will love it!
 

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On a different forum, there is one member who frequently camps with his dog, and the advice he gave was "Tips, as with most activities, supervision is our number one priority. Camping near water with a dog that is quick to eat stuff off the ground, I keep an extra eye open for discarded fishing hooks. IMO the biggest threat in most public campgrounds and parks is from other peoples dogs. There's always the one campsite with the dog who wouldn't hurt a fly, until they do." I can't offer too much advice though. Have fun camping!
 
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