Poodle Forum banner
81 - 99 of 99 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
Is there really risk of Parvo if they let too many people visit the facility? One breeder is saying that is the reason that you can only come on visit day
This comes up OVER and OVER on breeder groups, and you do get a range of responses, with a few breeders not allowing visitors. Here's the thing: parvo can kill a puppy, but so can undersocialization. IMO there are many ways short of keeping puppies in a bubble for 8-10 weeks to protect them from parvo and other diseases while providing a stimulating environment (i.e., outdoors and a variety of surfaces) and lots of human interaction.

The other thing to understand is that assuming the dam has good immunity from parvo and distemper, and assuming the puppies got adequate colostrum (first milk after whelping), the puppies will have good protection via maternal immunity for some weeks after birth. In fact, that's why you need to give a series of parvo/distemper shots to puppies--to make sure that one of them is given late enough that it isn't overridden by maternal antibodies. That is a long geeky way of explaining that although I don't want to introduce parvo into my house, I also don't see visitors as walking parvo bombs. I'm more worried about my breeder friends who have been tromping around dog shows than I am my non-dog friends and other visitors.

So I welcome visitors. I ask people to wear clean clothes and make sure they haven't recently visited a dog park, a dog show, or another breeder's house. Visitors remove shoes and wash hands.

Last year we lost a wonderful toy poodle breeder, Gayle Roberson of Poco a Poco toy poodles (BEST kennel name ever!). But her website lives on, and includes some great advice on shopping for a puppy.

: Poco A Poco Toy Poodles
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #83 ·
I would certainly avoid a breeder who would not let me see their kennels and meet their dogs until I arrived to collect a puppy. How can you know what sort of set up they have if you cannot visit?! And how can they assess you as a suitable home without ever meeting you?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,464 Posts
Based on a discussion in another thread here is a good screening tool for looking at websites. You want to see a reflection of the breeder's goals and work with their dogs to prove their worthiness for passing on their genes. Don't be pulled into the puppy inventory page (often with PayPal links) where you can reserve your specific puppy sight unseen. Someone with lots of available puppies on a website is potentially a miller, broker or other form of greeder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Wonderful post FJM!

Might I add, a red flag is breeders offering "papers" from questionable "registries" (which have few if any regulations and will register any puppy or dog for a fee, even mixed breeds and cross-bred designer dogs):

CKC (Continental Kennel Club, not to be confused with Canadian Kennel Club)
APRI (American Pet Registry Inc)
ACA (American Canine Registry)
And so on (there are many, many more)


Legit all-breed registries include:

American Kennel Club (AKC)
United Kennel Club (UKC)
Canadian Kennel Club (CKC)
The Kennel Club (UK)

There are many other legit national kennel clubs in countries throughout the world.
Another red flag to me is "breeders" who do nothing with their dogs. They don't show in conformation, obedience, agility trials, hunting trials, tracking, or participate in therapy work.

If the parents are not anything else but breeding dogs, why would that be? Someone who loves the breed, any breed, would be involved in things their dog is bred to do, or at least want to share and show off their wonderful pets.

I talked with a lot of breeders before finding my puppy. Registration with reputable Kennel Clubs is a good thing, but registering dogs is only paperwork. Having health testing is good too, but still does not require the love and dedication that breeders who love the breed should demonstrate by participating in some kind of dog-related activity with their dogs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,464 Posts
Well said cate&clair. I think poodles are so much more than just a pretty face and that doing some sort of activity with them takes advantage of their brainy ways. A small part of why I wanted a standard poodle when I got Lily was because obedience as a sport essentially started with them. If the right temperament isn't in the lines then the dog won't do good work and the only way to know for sure about the temperament is to have dogs who do things as the parents, grandparents, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
won't allow visit also

I too found a breeder that looked great on the website, requires references, does lots with their dogs BUT will not allow a visit (due to germs) prior to the puppies being weaned. That just doesn't sit right with me. Anyone recommend any standard breeders in Michigan or surrounding states? TIA.
 

·
Premium Member
Miss Pia Maria , Mr. Leonard Pink , Ida Lou and Ussman
Joined
·
8,571 Posts
I am quoting because some hard lessons need to be shared

I have read through this thread many times lately because it is never too soon to start preparing for my next pup/adult.

I usually figure myself as a smart person but it's easy to make a mistake or be misled

So I am putting this here as a cautionary tale because I have read more than a few posts of late regarding the high cost of health testing of poodle pups, the questions or just blatant statements of why one should pay these so called high prices, the pup I got from them is just fine.

I am not a breeder but I do reccomend you do your homework, truth be known I didn't on either of my pups

My Beatrice, is a toy poodle from a "home" breeder and she is a wonderful dog but what it cost me to get her bi-lateral luxating patellas surgically repaired, before she was 3 years old, I "jokingly say" I could have gotten another puppy for what it cost to fix them, truth is at NY prices vet othro prices I could have gotten several puppies from a reputable breeder.

For those who cannot do the math that is nearly $8000

Would pet insurance saved me, nope because my vet said at her first visit I got her at just shy of 18 weeks her knees were not great, but she may not get worse.

Yep I did my homework now but on knee strengthing exercises a pup I fell hard for.

I hear again and again the home breeders have beautiful puppies, hate to tell you all puppies are beautiful, it's easier to walk away when it's a photo on the computer than when it's a warm wiggly puppy in your lap.

And it's easy to think that a terrible breeder is someone who has puppy mill like conditions, that there are diseases like parvo, but I advise you to really look at the parents because that is what your pup will look like grown up

But when it's something that could have been avoided by good breeding practices like don't breed dogs that have crap knees or insert what other tested for maladies in here... seems some folks are thinking this can't possible affect them.

My Beatrice who is 39 months old at the time of this post, had her first surgery at a little over 16 months of age to repair a torn crucitate ligament and grade 3 luxating patella in her left knee and was 35 months old when she had her grade 4 right knee repaired.

Sure she is happy now, but basically I had a crippled dog up until now

You may luck out with a home breeder, me next time I will either adopt from a shelter, which is a crap shoot on genetics and temperment ( but I won't be lining someones pocket with $$$$) or find myself a breeder that does the required testing

okay I am done now, go back to you research


It's is a year later for Beatrice and I, she is suffering from cruciates and will most likely need another surgery to repair her cruciates ligament. Also she in the early stages of chronic kidney disease.

http://www.poodleforum.com/29-poodle-health/260617-beatrices-ultrasound-report.html


Hopefully after reading what I wrote you will please please please do your home work because if you think that $1800 - $2500 is too much for a pup from highly reputable breeder who does all health and genetic testing remember my cautionary tale.


Beatrice is 4 years old and I have spent another $2k on my $750 home bred cute wiggly warm sweet brown puppy.

I could have bought 4 puppies from highly reputable breeder who does all health and genetic testing for what I've paid trying to get my sweet little girl healthy.

Okay go back what you were doing I am off my soap box.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,464 Posts
twyla I am sorry you are going through all this with Bea. It is a rough bit of news for her. I do though once again have to thank you for your candor about what is happening with her. I hope people looking for the bargain puppy that a BYB or miller will take heed from your unfortunate problems with your cute little Bea.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Deere and twyla

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
It's is a year later for Beatrice and I, she is suffering from cruciates and will most likely need another surgery to repair her cruciates ligament. Also she in the early stages of chronic kidney disease.

http://www.poodleforum.com/29-poodle-health/260617-beatrices-ultrasound-report.html


Hopefully after reading what I wrote you will please please please do your home work because if you think that $1800 - $2500 is too much for a pup from highly reputable breeder who does all health and genetic testing remember my cautionary tale.


Beatrice is 4 years old and I have spent another $2k on my $750 home bred cute wiggly warm sweet brown puppy.

I could have bought 4 puppies from highly reputable breeder who does all health and genetic testing for what I've paid trying to get my sweet little girl healthy.

Okay go back what you were doing I am off my soap box.
So sorry. We did not do our research on our dog 35 years ago. Amazing personality, terrible health issues

Sent from my STV100-3 using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Miss Pia Maria , Mr. Leonard Pink , Ida Lou and Ussman
Joined
·
8,571 Posts
So sorry. We did not do our research on our dog 35 years ago. Amazing personality, terrible health issues

Sent from my STV100-3 using Tapatalk
Thank you All I can do is love my Beatrice, I do have my healthy boy Leonard thanks to what I have learned here
 

·
Premium Member
Miss Pia Maria , Mr. Leonard Pink , Ida Lou and Ussman
Joined
·
8,571 Posts
I am here to once again say do your research careful because any idiot can put two dogs together and make awesomely cute puppies because let's face it all puppies are adorable. But not all dogs should be bred, nor should just anyone be breeding dogs.
My toy poodle Beatrice has had a short pain filled life, thanks to idiots.
Congenital and inherited problems, luxating patellas end with deeper surgeries at 16 months and 3 years, diagnosed with early chronic kidney disease at age 4, at age 5 terminal cancer Lymphangiosarcoma, I don't know if she will see her 6th birthday on April 1st, she has lived longer than they thought she would.
My toy Pia has severe food intolerances, distachsis (inward growing lashes), and now is now being treated for cervical spine pain, thought is was the elbows, her conformation is horrible. But my vet and strongly suspect I.V.D.D.
(Intervertebral disc disease) we are treating with steroids and loads of rest for the next 4 to 6 weeks. miniature poodles are one of the breeds that can get this, damn genetic disorders.
Make sure the parents are friendly, they are cleaning housed, nicely groomed. The parents are old enough to be bred, which should when their health testing is done , like knees cannot be properly assessed until a toy poodle is two.
You think this can't happen not my poodle, or I only want pet quality so the testing isn't necessary.
I am never going see my girls get to gracefully age with me into retirement.
I was stupid and didn't know better, never again my advice is find a breeder that health tests, that also does confirmation, does agility, hunts does something with their dogs other than just make cute puppies.
Save up for that puppy, that you may think is expensive right now or you will be paying and paying after.
Gimmicky colors and sizes aside, I want my poodle pup to grow up healthy happy with and awesome temperament otherwise I will go to a rescue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
We have many discussions on here as to what constitutes a really good breeder, and rightly set our standards very high. In an ideal world, everyone would be prepared to research carefully, to build a relationship with an excellent breeder, and be ready to wait as long as it took for the right puppy to come along. But unfortunately we don't live in an ideal world...

In the hope of possibly saving new puppy owners from heartbreak, here are a few absolutely basic checks to go through when looking for a pup.

Absolute basics of puppy buying

Caveat emptor - buyer beware.
• Visit the puppy at its home, and see it with its mother.
• Understand and expect basic health tests and checks for parents and for puppies
• Get copies of registration and other documents with the puppy


Caveat emptor - buyer beware.

Most puppies are friendly, honest, desirous of pleasing, and want to be with you for the long term. Some, but not all, puppy sellers are the same. Would you buy a car sight unseen, from a small ad giving only a mobile phone number? Without registration papers or proof of ownership? When you buy a puppy, you are taking on responsibility for a living, breathing, thinking creature for the next 15 years or so - you can afford a little (or even a lot of) time, thought and research to make sure you choose wisely.

Visit the puppy at its home, and see it with its mother.
If the seller makes excuses - fear of animal rights extremists, in the process of redecorating, mother is elsewhere/out for a walk/too protective of her puppies to be seen, it is easier to deliver the puppy or meet you half way - there is a very high probability they are running or fronting a puppy mill. Practically all puppies in pet shops or sold through dealers (including internet dealers) are produced in puppy mills. Many small ads and free ads - online and in newspapers - are placed by dealers. Dogs in puppy mills are kept and treated as livestock, to be bred till they are no longer useful and then discarded. Every puppy bought from one encourages the business to continue. Every puppy they are unable to sell discourages the continuation. Don't support them - you may believe that you are rescuing the puppy (although if unsold, it will probably eventually find its way into rescue and a good home that way without enriching anyone along the way), but you are supporting the exploitation of the parents. Insist on seeing the puppy with its mother and litter mates, so that you can judge for yourself the puppy's health and the environment it has been raised in.

If you decide to have the puppy shipped to you, be even more careful. Deal directly with the breeder, and expect to have many detailed conversations before they accept you as a home for one of their pups. Look for genuine references (not celebrity endorsements), and ask for veterinary and other references. If at all possible, visit yourself, if not, ask a friend or relation to visit for you. Don't be misled by contracts that are all to the seller's benefit, and avoid anyone who is only interested in getting your credit card details, and not in the kind of home you are offering. And if the offer seems too good to be true, it probably is - there is a well known internet scam offering puppies "free", but then asking huge shipping fees for a puppy that never arrives...

People who love their dogs and their puppies care about what happens to them. They will want to talk to you about whether the pup is right for you, to know that you are able to look after it well, to meet you and show off their dogs and pups. They will not treat the puppy like a commodity, with money the only consideration. They would not dream of selling puppies through a dealer or pet shop (not even Harrods!). They will be busy looking after dogs and pups, so may not always answer the phone immediately - schedule a telephone conversation, and then a visit, before making any decision, to make sure this is the right pup for you, and that you are the right human for the puppy.

Understand and expect basic health tests and checks for parents and for puppies
Most breeds, including poodles, have a number of inherited health problems that can be avoided by proper testing before the parents are bred. These include PRA (a form of blindness), and joint problems with hips and knees. Because many of these problems are common to several breeds, poodle mixes are not immune - and parents of crosses need to be tested just the same. There are different schemes in different countries, you need to check which are relevant to your country, but be aware that a puppy from untested parents - particularly closely related untested parents, as is often the case in puppy mills and back yard breeders - may have very significant health problems. Familiarise yourself with what the test results should look like and what they mean, and ask to see them.

Puppies need regular worming, and the breeder should have a record of which wormer has been used, and when the pup was last treated. Pups should have clean coats, bright eyes (some pups get tear staining while teething, but extensive tear stains can indicate eye problems that might need veterinary treatment), clean ears with no smell, no signs of diarrhoea around the anus, and should generally smell of puppy. Check the bite - the top teeth should very slightly overlap the bottom teeth like the blades of a pair of scissors. Pups should be cheerful and playful - be wary of a puppy that seems lethargic or overly fearful.

Get copies of registration and other documents with the puppy
If you are buying and paying for a pure bred, registered puppy, make sure you are given all the relevant documents with the puppy. If they are not available for some reason (and Kennel Clubs can be very slow with documentation), and you are not dealing with a highly reputable breeder with a reputation to maintain, it is quite possible that the papers may never materialise. Be aware that not all registries are equal - some are there purely to make bad breeders look good, and have been known to register invented breeds, cats, and even kangaroos! Check other papers - vaccination certificates, veterinary certificates - carefully. In the UK, most good breeders will take advantage of the insurance schemes for breeders to ensure pups are covered for the first few weeks in their new homes - make sure you have the documentation for this.

And if in doubt, walk away. And if you doubt your ability to walk away, take a hard headed friend or relation with you. It can be very, very difficult to do when puppies are so adorable, but much better to take time to sleep on your decision than to get it wrong.
Poodles also have heart issues so , ask how mom and dad are before purchasing , mine is mixed breed so will have heart issues and start with heart murmur
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,191 Posts
Poodles also have heart issues so , ask how mom and dad are before purchasing , mine is mixed breed so will have heart issues and start with heart murmur
It's always recommended to get a history of health and proof of health testing. There is no purebred or mixed breed dog that I know of which can completely escape genetic health issues. This is why health testing of the sire's and dam's is so important to the future of the individual puppies and any future puppies from them.

I'm not sure why you expect your pup is going to have heart issues or a murmur. That's not a given, especially not just because of being a mixed breed.

If you're saying that one or both of your pup's parents have a diagnosed heart condition and your pup is also diagnosed already with a heart murmur, I'm sorry to hear that, for you all.

Testing could have prevented this, by not breeding affected dogs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Deere and fjm

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
Hi,

Buying a puppy safely is very important. Some illeagal dealers own puppy mills or farms that produce many puppies without care for the health and happiness of the mothers and puppies. There are many risks of owning a illeagally bred puppy, but by buying a puppy safely, they can be avoided.

Risks of owning an illeagally bred puppy:

1. Early death-
Most illegally bred puppies are sold online through social media or small ad sites, and the terrible fact is that more than 1 in 6 (15%) of those puppies bought online get sick or die in their first year.

2. Disease-
When you take your puppy home, it could develop severe illness straight away due to infection and the absence of vaccinations at puppy farms. Puppy farmed pups are more likely to have possibly life-threatning genetic disorders and deadly infectious diseases such as parvovirus, which causes vomiting and diarrhoea amongst other symptoms and can cost up to $6325 to treat.

3. Behavior issues-
Puppies from puppy farms are more likely to be more aggressive, anxious and show symptoms of trauma, as a result of being brought by in a stressful environment by puppy dealers. Unfortunately, these issues may never go away – they cannot always be solved through training or by a loving and caring home.

4. Increased vet bills-
The cost of buying a dog from a puppy farm can rack up over its lifetime. Owners who purchased from an Assured Breeder spent nearly 20% less in vet bills during their dog’s lifetime, compared to those from puppy farms.

5. Fuelling the trade-
Although it is a natural instinct to want to rescue a puppy from an unlikely situation, buying from an illegal dealer helps fuel a lucrative criminal industry that breeds dogs for profit, with no care for the welfare of the mum or puppy. This leads to further suffering in the long run.

When you are looking online:

1. Covid tactics-
Many illegal breeders are using coronavirus as an excuse for you not to come to visit the puppy before you buy. Reputable breeders will always allow you to see the puppy in its home environment and meet the mum safely. Given the current Government travel restriction, you should either source your puppy from a reputable breeder within your local authority area or wait until you can travel safely outside your area, even if that means having to wait a bit longer to get your puppy.

2. Phone numbers-
Many illegally farmed puppies are sold online, and dealers may create many adverts providing the same mobile number and descriptions of puppies. Try googling the number and descriptions to see if they’ve been used on lots of other adverts.

3. Stolen descriptions
Illegal dealers often copy and paste advert descriptions, and re-use them for selling multiple litters. To find out if the description of the puppy you’re thinking of buying is real or not, copy and paste it into your search engine. Again, if various adverts come up, it’s likely that your advert hasn’t been written by a verified seller.

4. Pasports-
If your puppy is advertised as having its own passport, this could be a sign that the puppy has been farmed overseas and brought to the Country the puppy currently is in to be sold.

5. Vaccinations-
Puppies can’t be vaccinated until they are over four weeks old. If the advert claims that the puppies have been vaccinated already and they are said to be younger than four weeks old, this claim is untrue.

6. Multiple litters-
If your seller is advertising multiple litters from different breeds of dog, this is a giveaway that they may be dealing puppy farmed dogs on a large scale. Verified sellers will mostly only trade in one breed of dog.

When meeting the puppy:

1. Meet at their home-
Always visit the puppy in the place where they’ve been bred and reared. It’s important that you follow the current coronavirus travel restriction and don’t travel outside your local authority area if advised not to. Don’t agree to meet halfway due to current travel restrictions, in places like a car park, lay-by, any other unusual place, or even have the puppy delivered directly to your door. Dealers may use the pandemic as an excuse to meet you somewhere and will often rent houses to sell puppies from, so it’s important to look out for all the warning signs.

2. Meet the mum-
Make sure you see the puppy’s mum. Due to coronavirus and the current travel restriction in place, meeting the puppy with its mum may not always be possible. You should wait until you can safely travel outside your area if you’re not buying a puppy within your local authority. Meeting the mum with her pups and having a chance to discuss matters with the breeder are vital steps to buying a puppy safely. Remember, some dealers will use an unrelated fake mum, but if she isn’t showing the puppies any attention, or watching you when you interact with her pups, she isn’t their mum.

3. Check the age and health of the puppy-
Puppies being sold before they’re at least eight weeks old is an immediate red flag. They need to stay with their mum long enough so that they can socialise and learn behaviours. Check that the puppy looks healthy with bright eyes and shiny fur. Any concerns you raise about the puppy’s health should not be swept aside and classed as ‘normal for the breed’. Healthy, happy and socialised puppies are naturally curious and will want to interact with you and their surroundings. If they are timid and not willing to interact, ask yourself why?

4. Check you get the right paperwork-
Illegal breeders will make excuses or give you fake paperwork that doesn’t look quite right. You should receive paperwork and certifications of vaccinations, worming records, microchipping certificates, and results of any health tests. Ideally, you’ll get a puppy contract. Verified and safe commercial breeders will have a local authority licence, and evidence of Assured Breeder Scheme membership.

5. Take your time-
If you feel like you’re being rushed to part with cash, pressured into buying a puppy or aren’t asked about your home situation, it may be an illegal breeder. Legitimate sellers won’t ever rush you and won’t mind you visiting the puppy more than once. Treat any dealer that can offer you a puppy within a few days with caution. Established, reputable dealers often have waiting lists, which can be even longer just now due to the pandemic.

6. Look at the price-
The price of puppies has more than doubled since lockdown, according to recent news, so it’s important to be aware that many illegal puppy traders are trying to cash in by increasing their prices to meet demand. Also, remember that a reputable breeder will never pressure you to part with cash or pay the full amount upfront, and you should never be asked to pay for your puppy online.

7. Think long term-
As the saying goes, a puppy is for life not just for Christmas, or lockdown for that matter. Please consider all the long-term implications of owning a puppy, such as puppy training, veterinary bills and food. Also, think about your day-to-day lifestyle. Do you have time to walk your puppy regularly - even after lockdown? How will your puppy respond to any children in your household? Reputable breeders and re-homing centres will ask these kinds of questions, whereas illegal traders may not.

Reporting a possible illegal dealer:

United States-
Cruelty or neglect laws vary by state but typically address conditions such as animals without food and water, sick dogs who are not being medically treated or dogs without adequate shelter from the elements. Prepare specific details of your complaint in advance and, after you have made a report, get a case number or contact information related to your case. If you do not hear back from the local authorities within a week, please call them back to ask for an update, but be aware that if there is an ongoing investigation some information may not be available to the public. If you can't get local help for the situation or are not sure who to call, please contact us. You may also wish to contact the United States Department of Agriculture Animal Care Division and find out if the USDA licenses the facility owner. Only "wholesale" breeding facilities (those that sell puppies to other businesses who in turn sell the puppies to the public) are required to be USDA licensed—this is a small portion of all the large-scale breeders in the country. Currently licensed breeders and some of their most recent inspection reports are available on the USDA/APHIS website. The HSUS Puppy Mill Task Force tipline, 1-877-MILL-TIP, is available to anyone with information on a possible crime involving puppy mills—especially information from those with "insider" knowledge, or from law enforcement officials who might be aware of such operations. If you witnessed deplorable conditions in person and wish to file a complaint with the HSUS, please call 1-877-MILL-TIP or report it. You can also file a complaint with the USDA. If you have purchased a puppy and wish to report problems to the HSUS, please complete the Pet Seller Complaint form. This form allows us to track data accurately and ensure that we have as much information as possible to help us in our fight to stop puppy mills.

Canada-
In Canada, we don’t have any laws specifically against puppy mills. But the worst puppy mills are in violation of animal cruelty laws due to the suffering and distress endured by the animals. The problem is that they are located in rural areas and are difficult for humane society or SPCA inspectors to uncover. When inspectors do find puppy mills, they are quick to take action to investigate. If you find or suspect a puppy mill, call your local humane society or SPCA or the police

United Kingdoms-
Do you think your puppy, or a puppy you have visited may be from a puppy farm? Or do you think you might have come into contact with an illegal puppy dealer? If so, you can report them to the Scottish SPCA below and help stop puppy farming for good.

Look beyond cute; the three pup checks:

1. Look for the mum-
Many illegal breeders are using coronavirus as an excuse for you not to come to the place where the puppy was bred and see it with its mum. Given the current Government travel restriction, you should either source your puppy from a reputable breeder within your local authority area or wait until you can travel safely outside your area. This might mean meeting the puppy and its mum isn’t possible just now, but it’s important that you wait until the travel restriction allows you to do so. This will let you to see the puppy in its home environment and meet the mum safely. Never agree to meet halfway due to current travel restrictions, in places like a car park, lay-by, any other unusual place, or have the puppy delivered directly to your door. Reputable breeders will always work within the current Government guidelines.

2. Look for paperwork-
You should always receive the puppy’s paperwork for vaccinations, microchipping, anti-worming medications and check-ups. Some dealers might use the current lockdown restrictions for not providing these essential documents or provide fake paperwork that doesn’t look right, or which doesn’t have the name, number and address of a real veterinary practice.

3. Look beyond cute-
Even if you are desperate for a pup right now or overcome by strong emotion to rescue it, if something doesn’t feel right, walk away and report your concerns to the right organization.

Now more than ever, it’s important to #LookBeyondCute and be aware of the three ‘Pup Checks’ to buy a puppy safely.



Note, this information was written during the pandemic and as a result some info may not be up to date in the future.

Credit goes to Buy A Puppy Safely for the information and reporting a illeagal dealer in the UK, Humane Canada for reporting a illeagal dealer in Canada and Humane Society of the United States for reporting a illeagal dealer in the US.

Olive Love
 
81 - 99 of 99 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top