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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Three weeks on Friday, Buddy is with us. Crate training : A+, intelligence and temperament, the same. Leaving him alone for short periods - the same.

Exuberance and leash pulling, needs work. Intelligence, better than mine, already in talks with trainer for a visit after last vaccination.

Walking the property every 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Excellent output, changed food (ProPlan) to a better one (BlueBuffalo), changed it back after his output was problematic, appetite is outstanding. Did I say he was energetic?

A con? Oh yes, the house training. Problem: house is carpeted. Early on, he pee'ed in his 'pen' area where his crate is housed. And pooped in another room. He stays in the same room as I.

Question:

How long before he can be trusted in the house without peeing and pooping on the carpet? Everything I've read says 6 months.

He is spending too much time in crate, imo, that can't be helped. He has the run of the kitchen. Seems forever before the vaccinations are complete and I can get him off the property.

How long before he stops eats everything on the ground, i.e., leaves, gravel, grass, rocks, mulch, you name it, he tries to eat it.

Pro: he is a sweetheart, and oddly, already seems bonded to me.

I remain steadfast in my opinion: senior citizens should NOT be sold puppies.

Thank you for reading.
 

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I was very conservative about allowing my boy spoo the run of the carpeted house, also using the kitchen as a play area. At nearly 4 yo, he’s never had an accident. He’s very bonded to me, would like to be a lap puppy hence I spend a lot of time sitting on the floor since he’s not allowed on furniture. Maybe this is due to the time spent together in the kitchen together? Others have used the tethering method with young dogs.

My dogs are both in their crates when I’m at work. Fact of life with a working owner.
 

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Congratulations on your puppy!
I agree, senior citizens should never get a pup. My mum got Rupert when she was 73 and now I have just adopted a very bouncy, unmannered 3 year old tpoo from them as he’s too hard for them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Thank you, scooter scout. Glad to hear he's not suffering in the crate - he doesn't seem to be.

Yellowbetty, I didn't have time to amend my post. Someone here said she does agility with dogs. I guess it depends on the 'state' of the senior citizen. If I had read around more, I would have seen the thread on buying an older dog from a breeder, and acted accordingly. However, I was overcome with grief and wasn't using my head.

I'm sure you will 'reform' your mum's tpoo, poodles are very adaptable. Buddy shows signs of being a very good dog, he (and I) simply has to get older.

Another question - when can I get him a groom? Does he need all his vaccines completed? And yet another - when is the optimum time to neuter him?

Thanks.
 

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Another question - when can I get him a groom? Does he need all his vaccines completed? And yet another - when is the optimum time to neuter him?

Thanks.
A standard poodle should be neutered at 12 to 18 months, mini or toy about 6-9 should be good.
If you can find a mobile groomer who will come to your house or a 'occasional' groomer that can ensure he only touches sanitized surfaces and will be the only dog there, you could get him groomed early. Otherwise, yes you should wait until vaccines are done. As you can imagine, a grooming salon (especially one in a pet store) is a high risk area.
Side note- personally I don't believe in keeping my dogs on my property until vaccines are complete- we go to low risk areas like Lowe's, family's homes, roads/sidewalks that are not commonly used. Socializing/exposure to new places is pretty important and the risk of behavioural issues on an unsocialized dog is higher than disease risk, at least in my area.
 

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No puppy should be considered housebroken until they are neuromuscularly well developed enough to resist pressure to relieve themselves, generally around six months old. Don't be fooled by him understanding the concept much earlier. If you want to reduce his crate time you can tie him to you with a leash so he can tell you when he needs to go.


Make sure you thoroughly clean the spots where he has gone with an enzyme based cleaner so he is not attracted to go again at those places.


I agree with Starvt about vaccines and when where to go out with your boy. I took Javelin all over the place starting when he was about 10-11 weeks old. The only place he went where his feet hit the floor and there were also dogs present was my obedience club, but he made plenty of appearances in non-pet but dog friendly stores. I carried him around in my immediate neighborhood too. I would be cautious about going to a busy grooming shop (but I do my own grooming anyway). If you aren't sure about whether you want paws on the floor, put him in a shopping cart.


For a male spoo I would not neuter until at least 15 months old unless you have ongoing behavior issues like house marking or aggressive behaviors. Generally though I prefer not to neuter male dogs since I don't think there are really compelling data on health benefits as exist for bitches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you, lily. Don't male dogs mark, though, if left intact? If I tied Buddy to me, I'd be on the floor. He is a puller as I have never seen, I'm worried about him dislocating his shoulders. I think we're on a good schedule, he needs just sit up in his crate to be brought out. I used a supposed star cleaner, Rollo, and it made me physically ill. I had to return it. I imagine it got the stain out though.

I've read here about carrying him around the neighborhood, but how does that socialize him? He also squirms to be let down, and there are too many leaves and poo here right now. I think he's okay with the limitation, I just hope the schedule from the vet is human!

Thanks, Starvt, on the grooming question. I'm leaning, again, towards waiting until the vaccines are done. Thanks on the 6-9 month mark, that's what I thought I understood. I appreciate the expert info from you all.

On the eating, though, is this 'normal'?? The leaves will soon be gone, but the mulch is in all the beds. I make every effort to keep him from them, but once he is on the street, he may be looking to eat everything. I read about a harness, but don't want to do that to him. I lunge for his mouth, and pull on the harness, but again, I'm worried about dislocating his shoulders.
 

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Peggy quickly learned to throw her whole weight into her harness to pull us forward. And our trainer just as quickly corrected us: "That was your fault! You're teaching her to do that!" (Our trainer doesn't pull any punches.)

Each time a puppy's allowed to pull, they are being taught to pull. You pull back, they pull harder. The behaviour's reinforced.

We thought we'd never "get it" but within a single intensive session with our trainer we saw huge improvement in our own coordination. Because that's really what it's about! Just learning how to react appropriately and then getting all your muscles to do the right thing at the right time.

Now, if Peggy reaches the end of the leash we have options: We can change direction with a cheery "Let's go!"

We can stop.

We can walk our hands, fist over fist, down the leash, until we "catch up to her" and release the tension.

And always we use tasty bits of food to catch the attention of her nose and steer her away from distractions.

It's all rather hard to describe, but these techniques do work really well together when practiced. Especially with a front clip harness that naturally coaxes them back around to you when they tug,

I encourage you to start working right away with your trainer. No reason to wait, especially if you're worried about injury to yourself or Buddy. (I've already needed one emergency chiropractor appointment and Peggy's only 23 weeks.)

The less opportunity Buddy has to practice undesirable behaviours, the easier it will be for him to learn what's expected of him.

Our trainer runs weekly puppy classes in a clean environment with dogs on the same vaccination schedule. She is adament that we all understand: Positive socialization is SO very important. It's as important as vaccinations to the lifetime health of the dog.

As for housebreaking, I always recommend Ian Dunbar's book, "Before And After Getting Your Puppy."
 

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Oh! And the eating.... Yes. It's unfortunately normal. And, in our current experience, lunging at them will only make the item seem even more desirable to their exploring mouths.

So I always do potty outings with treats, practicing our leash walking at the same time. If Peggy wants to sniff something, I let her. This is part of being a puppy. But I correct her with an "Ah!" if her mouth starts to open, and then quickly pop a treat in it when she looks at me.

It works about 50% of the time, which is much better than where we were at a month ago.

Frankly, it's exhausting.
 

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One thing to point out, is that it's physically impossible to dislocate his shoulders- they are not jointed to anything but his leg. So unless you are pulling on his legs you are good there! I do totally hear you on injuring your own arm or shoulder though. I walked my friend's tiny yorkiepoo and felt like I had carpal tunnel by the end! And I'm relatively young!
I'm not a huge fan of carrying a dog around but it's better than nothing- he will still benefit from seeing new sights, sounds and smells so that they are not shocking and scary to him once he is older.
Is there anywhere you can drive to walk him? I drive to a local park that has nice wide paved paths. We stay on the paved areas since they are much less likely to retain any parasites or disease than grass, leaves, etc.
As far as the pulling and such: I have this Puppy Culture video I am using on my pup (I've used other PC stuff with my other dog's as well). It teaches your dog to give you attention in distracting situations. It is working wonders for us and I find it helps during walks as well.
https://shoppuppyculture.com/collec...-attention-is-the-mother-of-all-behaviors-vod
 

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Thank you, lily. Don't male dogs mark, though, if left intact? If I tied Buddy to me, I'd be on the floor. He is a puller as I have never seen, I'm worried about him dislocating his shoulders. I think we're on a good schedule, he needs just sit up in his crate to be brought out. I used a supposed star cleaner, Rollo, and it made me physically ill. I had to return it. I imagine it got the stain out though.

I've read here about carrying him around the neighborhood, but how does that socialize him? He also squirms to be let down, and there are too many leaves and poo here right now. I think he's okay with the limitation, I just hope the schedule from the vet is human!

Thanks, Starvt, on the grooming question. I'm leaning, again, towards waiting until the vaccines are done. Thanks on the 6-9 month mark, that's what I thought I understood. I appreciate the expert info from you all.

On the eating, though, is this 'normal'?? The leaves will soon be gone, but the mulch is in all the beds. I make every effort to keep him from them, but once he is on the street, he may be looking to eat everything. I read about a harness, but don't want to do that to him. I lunge for his mouth, and pull on the harness, but again, I'm worried about dislocating his shoulders.



I have two intact male dogs, ages 4 (Javelin) and 11 (Peeves GSD). Neither would dream of marking ever.



Pulling on leash cannot dislocate his shoulders!


Carrying him lets him see and smell local sights and sounds and can be used to let him meet people. Puppy play group or a play date with a healthy polite adult dog can do the other socializing aspects.
 

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My male is intact and has never marked indoors, not even in smelly hotel rooms. I was worried about it and it turned out to not be a problem. He does mark outdoors, on top of every other dog’s urine.
 

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Three weeks on Friday, Buddy is with us. Crate training : A+, intelligence and temperament, the same. Leaving him alone for short periods - the same.

Exuberance and leash pulling, needs work. Intelligence, better than mine, already in talks with trainer for a visit after last vaccination.

Walking the property every 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Excellent output, changed food (ProPlan) to a better one (BlueBuffalo), changed it back after his output was problematic, appetite is outstanding. Did I say he was energetic?

A con? Oh yes, the house training. Problem: house is carpeted. Early on, he pee'ed in his 'pen' area where his crate is housed. And pooped in another room. He stays in the same room as I.

Question:

How long before he can be trusted in the house without peeing and pooping on the carpet? Everything I've read says 6 months.

He is spending too much time in crate, imo, that can't be helped. He has the run of the kitchen. Seems forever before the vaccinations are complete and I can get him off the property.

How long before he stops eats everything on the ground, i.e., leaves, gravel, grass, rocks, mulch, you name it, he tries to eat it.

Pro: he is a sweetheart, and oddly, already seems bonded to me.

I remain steadfast in my opinion: senior citizens should NOT be sold puppies.

Thank you for reading.
------------------------------------

Hi and Welcome to Buddy!!

I think I remember you saying that Buddy is a mini? Mine have all been mini's but my memory is best with my current boys :).

I was pretty conservative with mine since I hadn't had puppies (never mind two at the same time) in over 30 years.

By 3-4 months they were grasping the idea of not going in the house, but as lily cd re said, they're simply not physically developed enough til around 6 months to be reliable in the house. Til then, vigilance and enzyme cleaner (Nature's Miracle is often recommended) are the order of the day.

Are you using pee pads? I used them, mostly near the doors to outside to help with the association of outside=go pee/poo. I also strung bells from the door knob and dingled them every time we went out saying "ring the bell, go outside". I honestly didn't think they'd get that association but left them up and said the phrase occasionally, to amuse myself. Imagine my surprise when I was sitting with my laptop and I heard dingling behind me!

I kept track of accidents in the house and by 5 months it had almost stopped. That was vigilance :). When they'd gone a month without any accidents, I figured we were pretty well there.

We were both retired so were home most of the time but the care and training fell on me. Tethering two to me wasn't an option. We had upstairs crates for sleeping and downstairs crates for chilling. I also had an ex-pen.

I used gates to restrict them to the two rooms we spent most of our time in together, the kitchen and family room. In the early months they were almost never out of my sight. As they got older and reliable in the house, I expanded the gated areas. They earned full access to the main floor after the holidays, about 8 months old.

You say you think Buddy's spends too much time in the crate. How much time is he crated daily (not including sleep time)? Is it in then out for short periods or several hours at a time daily?

Socialization is about experiences and isn't limited to exposure to other people or dogs. The suggestions to bring him everywhere you can and keep him in a cart or a shoulder carrier til he gets fully vaccinated are great. The weather is going to be a factor quickly, so get in as much as you can. If you have a car, take him to safe parking lots at businesses or malls to just watch what goes by, in addition to the parks or other outside areas. We walked around our neighborhood also before they were fully vaccinated. Our vet cleared it so long as we paid attention to where they were walking.

Groomers may not be able to take him in to their businesses til he's had his rabies vaccines. The suggestion of a mobile groomer might be an option. Check to see if they're required to have proof of vaccination also.

Til you can get him groomed, grab an electric shaver (or toothbrush) with the cap on and run it over him as if he's being groomed, get him used to the feel and sounds. If you have some round tipped scissors, open and close them around him also. Handle his feet a lot, open his mouth and look in, go to your chosen vet for a few no reason at all visits to the front office so he doesn't associate that trip with only pokes and prods.

He may stop soon or may never stop eating things he shouldn't so work on Leave it and Drop it a few minutes every day. Have something handy at all times to trade for whatever he picks up.

Pulling is another dilemma. Harnesses are preferred to avoid injuring the trachea but for many pups they just encourage pulling. Collars tend to help reduce pulling but they can be a bit scary. PTP's description of how to manage the pulling is good.

If you choose to neuter, current medical science indicates to wait til he's physically mature. If you choose to leave him intact, marking isn't necessarily something they do automatically because of that. Some don't mark in their own house but will in others (mine did that), some can be trained out of it, some just don't. My boys had just about stopped those behaviors before they were 1 year. (They still mark on our walks.) We chose to neuter after they turned 1 year because we wanted to travel with them or would sometimes have to board them.

I tend to forget that I'm a senior lol. My concern over taking on a puppy was strictly related to leaving them homeless if DH and I didn't outlive them. I will admit to being certain that I had lost my mind many times...what was I thinking taking on TWO puppies!!

As the housetraining kicks in, the teething ends, the lack of sleep diminishes, the training pays off, and you find yourself sitting on the sofa with a sweet, soft, silly puppy on your lap or by your side, you know you made it thru and you have an incredible companion for many years to come.
 
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