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Discussion Starter #1
I know of a toy poodle owner who never brushes her dog's head and face. She just does the body and legs. She says that it is not a requirement to brush her dog's face and head. She also says that the dog has tearing issues from the dog's eyes so right after brushing the face, the owner says that the face fur gets all tangled up again anyways so the owner says why bother. Is this correct? Does the face and head of a toy poodle not require brushing at all?
 

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No, if you do not brush your dogs head and ears, they will get so tangled that the dog will have to be shaved down. Was she serious? The summer that I worked with a groomer, we used to get many dogs with "earrings" made up of tangled mats right behind the dogs ear. I remember that I got a couple "earrings" that were six inches long.Sometimes the tender skin on the dog's ear was red and irritated from the mat pulling it's ear hair. The worst were Old English Sheepdogs because they played in sprinklers and were not combed or brushed; their coat was felted in several areas. Ugh!
 

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She is misinformed. Not only should every square inch of a poodle be groomed regularly by brushing, combing also is the only way to be sure that there are no tangles, mats, etc. What they're called isn't important but the serious issues that can arise for the poodle sure are.

Something else that it sounds unlikely that she'll do but will make the poodles life better is to shave the face so it isn't furred up.

I start by brushing with a round headed pin brush to get thru the fur.

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Then a greyhound comb, wide space side first to work down to the skin and find the tangles, mats,etc.

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Any time you find one, it should be gently teased out or if too tangled, gently snipped thru, then try combing again til the comb goes thru without snagging.

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Once I can comb thru with the wide spaced tooth side, I go over again with the close spaced teeth to make sure all tangles, mats, etc, are gone by combing from the skin out to the end of the fur.

Then I finish off with a soft tipped slicker
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This needs to be done frequently, daily preferably but at least every other day. I can't imagine that her poor little poodle doesn't have a lot of tangling, matting, even on the body if she isn't combing also.

Every bath and dry will cause any tangles, mats, to tighten and possibly catch other portions of fur. This can end in a poodle requiring a full shave down. Limbs have been lost due to matting pulling so tightly that circulation is cut off and the limb dies on the poodle.

Tearing is quite common in poodles, all sizes. It's easier to see in the lighter poodles. Tearing could be environmental or a food allergy, it could be blocked tear ducts or some other medical issue, but keeping the face close shaved will help keep the area cleaner and more free of environmental irritants.
 

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Leaving the tears to mat the hair like that would be so painful on such a sensitive are. :( Maybe your friend would consider joining Poodle Forum and learning about grooming alongside so many of us. I learn something new every day!
 

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Oh my, poor dog ! Can you imagine hair pulling on your head, face and eyes constantly ? That is neglect, there is no other way to say it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
She is misinformed. Not only should every square inch of a poodle be groomed regularly by brushing, combing also is the only way to be sure that there are no tangles, mats, etc. What they're called isn't important but the serious issues that can arise for the poodle sure are.

Something else that it sounds unlikely that she'll do but will make the poodles life better is to shave the face so it isn't furred up.

I start by brushing with a round headed pin brush to get thru the fur.

View attachment 472729

Then a greyhound comb, wide space side first to work down to the skin and find the tangles, mats,etc.

View attachment 472730

Any time you find one, it should be gently teased out or if too tangled, gently snipped thru, then try combing again til the comb goes thru without snagging.

View attachment 472731

View attachment 472734


View attachment 472733

View attachment 472735

Once I can comb thru with the wide spaced tooth side, I go over again with the close spaced teeth to make sure all tangles, mats, etc, are gone by combing from the skin out to the end of the fur.

Then I finish off with a soft tipped slicker
View attachment 472736

This needs to be done frequently, daily preferably but at least every other day. I can't imagine that her poor little poodle doesn't have a lot of tangling, matting, even on the body if she isn't combing also.

Every bath and dry will cause any tangles, mats, to tighten and possibly catch other portions of fur. This can end in a poodle requiring a full shave down. Limbs have been lost due to matting pulling so tightly that circulation is cut off and the limb dies on the poodle.

Tearing is quite common in poodles, all sizes. It's easier to see in the lighter poodles. Tearing could be environmental or a food allergy, it could be blocked tear ducts or some other medical issue, but keeping the face close shaved will help keep the area cleaner and more free of environmental irritants.
What is the difference between the pin brush and the slicker brush? I also noticed most slicker brushes are sharp on the ends so I don't know how deep to go with the slicker brush
 

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Extreme close up of a Paw Brothers Universal Type Slicker with Coated Pin Tips (Thanks Raindrops for the recommendation. I'll never use the untipped slicker again.)

Pin Brush

The pin brush is a very common all round brush when it comes to getting out minor matts and tangles from medium-long haired dogs. They have rubber or plastic tips on them and are gentle on thick or curly coats which is why many use these as a first resort for minor knots and matts. They are generally quite kind to your dog’s skin and are safe to use on most breeds.

Slicker Brush

The Slicker brush is a very common brush and is typically used on medium to long haired dogs for removing matts and tangles, and loose hair from the undercoat. They are made up of fine, wire bristles which are normally angled in a certain way and/ or have protective tips to reduce irritation to your dog’s skin. They tend to work great, but it pays to be careful with how much pressure you apply and it pays to brush with the direction of the coat.



The teeth on the slicker are thinner, bent towards the tips, many more of them, and much closer together

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Extreme close up of pin brush. Teeth on a pin brush are usually longer, and more widely spaced
472765
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Extreme close up of a Paw Brothers Universal Type Slicker with Coated Pin Tips (Thanks Raindrops for the recommendation. I'll never use the untipped slicker again.)

The teeth on the slicker are thinner, bent towards the tips, many more of them, and much closer together

View attachment 472764

Extreme close up of pin brush. Teeth on a pin brush are usually longer, and more widely spaced
View attachment 472765
Got it! But how deep should I go with a slicker brush that is untipped. I didn't know they sell tipped slicker brushes. So my question is how do I brush with an untipped slicker brush?
 

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brush your self first, if it hurts, buy a new brush
 

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I don't know how deep to go with the slicker brush
Short demo video of the Paw Brothers Universal Type Slicker with Coated Pin Tips.
It's safe to go down to the skin if you can get thru to it. You'll see initial resistance from the fur to the brush. Since I keep my boys frequently brushed, this is not going thru actual tangles or matting but is separating the fur to prevent that.
As the brush goes thru a section repeated times. you'll see that it goes thru much smoother and the resistance from the fur is gone. His fur is around an inch long right now.
With the safe, coated pin tips, you can see that he doesn't mind being brushed. I expect it feels something like a scalp massage :).
 

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A full groom of her handsome Misha from Raindrops
 
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