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My 8 month old spoo came in from the back yard with a broken hind toe. We are not sure how she did it, may have been a rock she flipped over on herself. We took her to the vet and confirmed it was broke. The vet decided to just leave it to heal by its self. So no wrap or anything. Well, trying to limit her mobility has been impossible. I have two dogs and they love to play. If I create her she cry’s and scratches to get out( all day).She has never been alone so separating her just causes stress. I take her out on a leash to do her job and she won’t. She needs to be free , to do that. However, if she is free she jumps and runs. She only has broken it 5 days ago, so not sure what to do. She is bored and young and doesn’t seem to care that her toe is broken lol. Has anyone else been through this sort of thing??


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You need to be firm. She will eventually have to go bad enough that she will go on a leash (bring treats with you and praise and reward liberally when she does) so you are training eliminating on a leash for future. You also should be able to separate your dogs if need be without such separation anxiety from the younger one. I always get my dogs used to being separated from each other for such a reason as you are having now. I don't know how bad the break was and/or why the vet decided to let it heal on its own. But if you can't control her activity you might want to let the vet know that and ask him to wrap it. He may also be able to give you a mild sedative to keep her calmer. If the toe heals incorrectly it can cause you problems down the road, affect her gait, arthritis, etc. You have a young dog, you don't want that. I have known people who have had issues with toes healing incorrectly that required surgery down the road, especially if it is a weight bearing toe.
 

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I agree with Eclipse. Be firm and make sure your dog heals properly. I might even consider a second opinion if your vet doesn't want to do anything after you talk about the issues that are going on. I had a Maine Coon cat many years ago who luxated her patella. She was only three years old and hadn't actually closed her growth plates (seen on X ray) at the time. Surgery was the only way to go since I didn't want her to suffer avoidable arthritis later in life.


Do some static brain game type training to tire her out. You will have a much easier time getting her to rest comfortably and quietly in her crate after some good thinking work. I am currently working with a client who has an adolescent GSD who we have been working on impulse control and attention activities (mostly static) and the owner told me yesterday that the pup has slept super well after our work sessions. Drain the brain!
 
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Discussion Starter #4
You need to be firm. She will eventually have to go bad enough that she will go on a leash (bring treats with you and praise and reward liberally when she does) so you are training eliminating on a leash for future. You also should be able to separate your dogs if need be without such separation anxiety from the younger one. I always get my dogs used to being separated from each other for such a reason as you are having now. I don't know how bad the break was and/or why the vet decided to let it heal on its own. But if you can't control her activity you might want to let the vet know that and ask him to wrap it. He may also be able to give you a mild sedative to keep her calmer. If the toe heals incorrectly it can cause you problems down the road, affect her gait, arthritis, etc. You have a young dog, you don't want that. I have known people who have had issues with toes healing incorrectly that required surgery down the road, especially if it is a weight bearing toe.


Thanks so much for your advice. It is a weight bearing toe. The vet said that it should heal fine on it’s own, knowing the situation. I find that even if a separate them, she gets so excited when we let her out that she bounces on her hind legs even more then normal. Maybe I’ll talk to the vet again to see if they could give me something to calm her down. Just wondering why they would have suggested that to begin with. So frustrating.


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I agree with Eclipse. Be firm and make sure your dog heals properly. I might even consider a second opinion if your vet doesn't want to do anything after you talk about the issues that are going on. I had a Maine Coon cat many years ago who luxated her patella. She was only three years old and hadn't actually closed her growth plates (seen on X ray) at the time. Surgery was the only way to go since I didn't want her to suffer avoidable arthritis later in life.


Do some static brain game type training to tire her out. You will have a much easier time getting her to rest comfortably and quietly in her crate after some good thinking work. I am currently working with a client who has an adolescent GSD who we have been working on impulse control and attention activities (mostly static) and the owner told me yesterday that the pup has slept super well after our work sessions. Drain the brain!


Thanks for the info. Could you suggest what type of brain games. I work most of the day in my studio , so is this something I would have to do all day or just at times?


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Not all day, but at intervals throughout the day for five or ten minutes.



Here are ideas:


interactive play with a puzzle toy including just the shell game with paper cups with a treat under one of them


teach tricks that won't require her to put weight on her back end (roll over, play dead, crawl)


focused attention games (like the "five cookie game" here https://www.poodleforum.com/2525001-post64.html)


reinforce commands like down stays and waits
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Not all day, but at intervals throughout the day for five or ten minutes.



Here are ideas:


interactive play with a puzzle toy including just the shell game with paper cups with a treat under one of them


teach tricks that won't require her to put weight on her back end (roll over, play dead, crawl)


focused attention games (like the "five cookie game" here https://www.poodleforum.com/2525001-post64.html)


reinforce commands like down stays and waits


Thanks , that helps a lot


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