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We are adopting a 7 year old toy poodle from a local shelter and he is scheduled to be released on Wednesday after a neuter surgery. He was surrendered by the owner last week after the family was displaced. They were offered free boarding in place of surrender but did not accept it so he was put up for adoption and can go home after a waiting period in case they change their mind.

He is in rough physical shape, his coat had been very matted, nails curled under and his teeth are stage 4 dental disease. I am not sure about his height (he appears much smaller than our mini poo) but he looks far too thin to me. We met him after he had been shaved down, he has protruding ribs and hip bones and weighs 7lbs. I also noticed scabs on his back, belly and neck (collar area), likely from the matting. He is getting care onsite but it is limited so he will be seen immediately by our veterinarian. I only wish I could take him home sooner but it is not allowed because of the waiting period.

His backstory is sketchy, the owners said he was only 4 but the examining doctor definitely did not agree so I don't know how much validity to give to the rest of the information provided by the previous owner. :afraid:

All that being said, he did not hesitate to walk out into the lobby and then outside on a leash with a volunteer and check everything out, including us. ? Initially he looked away and was lip-licking, but he did allow for touching and even leaned into it at one point. It is a loud and smelly place, sitting on a busy road so it can be very difficult to get a good read on a dog in these situations. I really know nothing about him.

I've adopted shelter dogs (no poodles) before but not one as physically neglected as he has been and I would appreciate input. I really want to go at his pace and provide him a loving home. Thankfully I am home every day so have plenty of time to see this through. Our family has owned poodles going on 20 years, we currently have a mini, Teddy, turning 2 in August. This will be our first toy poodle.

Thank you in advance. ?
 

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The best advice I can give is to bring the dog home and then leave it alone.

Everything around it will be new and bewildering. Leave it to wander, sniff, and check out these new surroundings. That should be enough stimulus for at least a day.

I/me would not approach them at all, simply let them explore and ignore them. But let his actions be your guide. If he's cowering, let him hide. If he's bold, look at him and talk to him.

DON'T try to teach him tricks on his first day. ;) lol
 

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It's kind of you to take in this seemingly neglected dog. I suppose there's not much you can do until the waiting period ends and the dog is officially yours. But it sounds like you are doing the right things so far - preparing for proper medical care, and being ready to devote plenty of your time and attention to your new family member. Based on how poorly cared-for he has been, I wouldn't be surprised if he'll need some obedience training, so it might be a good idea to line up a training class or two. Best of luck to you both!
 

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Congrats and thank you for adopting him! Gosh, will he be a lucky pup to have you. I totally agree with the advice given--let him settle in, go at his pace. He might warm up fast and he might take a while. Just provide that security that he needs.

I hope his teeth and nails will be taken care of when he's under for his neuter?!
 

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What he needs to know his first day is where the toilet is.

If you have a yard, walk him around the yard before bringing him inside. When you bring him to the door, ask for a sit. Have a little treat in your hand and give it to him if he sits. Now, he is wildly successful. Wait 20 or 30 minutes and bring him out again, having him sit both going out and going in, treating. Just one little treat and one "good dog". As mentioned above, you don't want to overwhelm him with affection.

He will feel more confident being told he is doing the right thing. Most dogs know sit but with a rescue many do not. If he does not sit at the door the first time, use the treat to lure him into a sit, so you are teaching him two things at once (sit at door to make it open, and "sit").

Keep the doors closed so he has a small area to be in. He does not need to go into the bedrooms or office. He may feel safe in a crate, so try it out.
 

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I got a poodle/maybe poodle mix from a rescue a little over a year ago. She also was an owner surrender and days away from turning 6. She had been fixed just a few weeks before I took her home and she was underweight. She came from a foster home and I think that stable environment made things a little easier on her....however, she still struggled initially with yet another move.

I agree with giving the dog space, but also remember to keep a close eye on the dog. When I got Miracle, she threw up for 2 days straight and was very unresponsive and lethargic. She was fine with sitting next to me on my bed/couch but also was fine in the playpen I set up for her. She didn't ask for attention or want to engage until day 3. At that point she stared eating some food (took a lot of encouragement to get her to eat something) and I would suggest having pumpkin around for an upset stomach.

Have a safe area set up for your dog with a bed, water, whatever food the shelter fed the dog to start with. As I mentioned above I used a playpen instead of a crate. This is where she initially slept and stayed when I was gone or wasn't watching her. A crate might be better for you.

All rescue dogs have different stories and backgrounds so I wish you luck. Thank you for rescuing.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I hope his teeth and nails will be taken care of when he's under for his neuter?!
Unfortunately not his teeth, this is the city shelter, and they will only do the neuter. I really do hope they do his nails, I think it was attempted somewhat when he had his coat shaved off but they still are much too long.
 

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What he needs to know his first day is where the toilet is.

If you have a yard, walk him around the yard before bringing him inside. When you bring him to the door, ask for a sit. Have a little treat in your hand and give it to him if he sits. Now, he is wildly successful. Wait 20 or 30 minutes and bring him out again, having him sit both going out and going in, treating. Just one little treat and one "good dog". As mentioned above, you don't want to overwhelm him with affection.

He will feel more confident being told he is doing the right thing. Most dogs know sit but with a rescue many do not. If he does not sit at the door the first time, use the treat to lure him into a sit, so you are teaching him two things at once (sit at door to make it open, and "sit").

Keep the doors closed so he has a small area to be in. He does not need to go into the bedrooms or office. He may feel safe in a crate, so try it out.
This is great to know, thank you. Such a simple thing, but what a terrific way to build a bond. His paperwork says he knows several commands beyond sit though of course we did not do any of that when we met him.
 

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Unfortunately not his teeth, this is the city shelter, and they will only do the neuter. I really do hope they do his nails, I think it was attempted somewhat when he had his coat shaved off but they still are much too long.
It doesn't hurt to ask if they can clean his teeth if you pay for it. I was able to do that with my Maltese. I was also able to get a dog bathed before his neuter, as he was absolutely filthy (paid for that too). Some shelters will work with you. I've adopted/fostered many dogs.
 

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Bless you for adopting this dog. I don't understand a waiting period for owners to change their minds when the dog was clearly neglected/abused. This is unconscionable. It sounds though, that they don't want him so I bet you'll get him.

What a great thing you'll be doing for him. You can get him all checked out and hopefully he'll be healthy enough for a dental, if not now...a little later when he's more settled in.

I think everyone gave you such good advice, I don't have much to add. I wouldn't try pressuring him just yet to sit for anything unless he is perfectly at ease and looks like he'd like to for fun. He may not even know how to sit on cue. I like CB's idea to just let the dog do his own thing at first. And I like the idea of taking him around the yard first and letting him try out a little marking. Show him where to pee etc. As far as ignoring him, I might not completely ignore him if he seems interested in being friends. But let him come to you and initiate. You'll just have to wait and see what he's like. Good luck and kudos to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I got a poodle/maybe poodle mix from a rescue a little over a year ago. She also was an owner surrender and days away from turning 6. She had been fixed just a few weeks before I took her home and she was underweight. She came from a foster home and I think that stable environment made things a little easier on her....however, she still struggled initially with yet another move.

I agree with giving the dog space, but also remember to keep a close eye on the dog. When I got Miracle, she threw up for 2 days straight and was very unresponsive and lethargic. She was fine with sitting next to me on my bed/couch but also was fine in the playpen I set up for her. She didn't ask for attention or want to engage until day 3. At that point she stared eating some food (took a lot of encouragement to get her to eat something) and I would suggest having pumpkin around for an upset stomach.

Have a safe area set up for your dog with a bed, water, whatever food the shelter fed the dog to start with. As I mentioned above I used a playpen instead of a crate. This is where she initially slept and stayed when I was gone or wasn't watching her. A crate might be better for you.

All rescue dogs have different stories and backgrounds so I wish you luck. Thank you for rescuing.
I am worried about this very thing since he looks sooo thin and I could see he had thrown up bile in his cage. Teddy, our current poo, still will occasionally refuse food in the mornings to the point of throwing up bile but it is generally an easy fix. I try to always have a can of pumpkin in our pantry though just in case. Also, the aftereffects of surgery can lead to stomach issues too, so it is possible we will be dealing with that.
 

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Yep...the city has it's policies I suppose. And when THEY have a policy, they go by rote and make no exceptions to their policy...don't take anything into consideration, not even the animals' welfare sometimes.
 

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I so hope this dog will be yours after the waiting period as it sounds like you will take care of any needs and provide a wonderful home.
 

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I really hope nothing prevents you from getting him. He needs a good home and deserves to be cared for. No dog should be returned to a home that put him in that state.
 

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I also wish you would offer to pay for a dental cleaning during the neuter. Even if the dog isn’t yours quite yet. I completely agree that poor poodle has been abused and it’s disgraceful that the previous owners are accorded the same courtesy as an owner who had to surrender an animal in good shape. Bless you for adopting him!
 

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I also wish you would offer to pay for a dental cleaning during the neuter. Even if the dog isn’t yours quite yet. I completely agree that poor poodle has been abused and it’s disgraceful that the previous owners are accorded the same courtesy as an owner who had to surrender an animal in good shape. Bless you for adopting him!
Yes, I will speak to them about it today or tomorrow, I've left a message and continue to call in case they pick up the phone today. I would prefer it was done now so he doesn't have to go under twice. ?
 

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Yes, I will speak to them about it today or tomorrow, I've left a message and continue to call in case they pick up the phone today. I would prefer it was done now so he doesn't have to go under twice. ?
Thank you for all of the well wishes. ❤ A bit of an update, I was able to get through and speak to a real person. There is no option of getting his dental work done through them, they do not have access to a dental suite - that's disappointing.

I also learned that he has now developed diarrhea with some blood in it :afraid: and they have started him on medication. She felt it was stress related from being at the shelter. If he is still doing poorly on Wednesday they will waive the neuter requirement and let him come home to us - yay! I can then proceed with the dental work and neuter through my own vet once he is more stable.

On a more positive note, he has had a terrific appetite according to them, I was very happy to hear that. She commiserated with me about the holding time but reiterated that cannot be waived, so almost 48 more hours there for the little guy. I'm trying to stay positive, they feel he is very stressed by being there, which concerned me even more. She did know which dog he was right away though, goodness I hope they continue keeping a good eye on him.
 
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