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Hi everyone. I am currently in the market for a new puppy.

Molly is 5 months old and she sometimes feel lonely as me & my wife are very busy with our work and seldom have time to play with her.

We often bring her to doggy daycare and she gets very excited when playing with other dogs. That is why I am now considering to buy a second dog to accompany her when I don't have the time to play with her.

Should I get another poodle or is it okay to buy an English Bulldog for my second pup? I am in love with the English Bulldog breed but am worried that Bulldog & Poodle will not get along.

Any helpful comments will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you so much.
 

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Didn't you already rule out getting another dog back in the early part of the summer? If Molly is happy at day care then stick with that. Also why the heck an english bulldog if any other dog? They have horrible health problems.


Please go back to your old thread asking about getting another poodle and reread what I said then about the potential pitfalls of two very young dogs.
 
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I believe you asked this same question two months ago when Molly was 3 months old, the answers will be the same. Bringing home a 2nd pup regardless of breed will not make your current puppy any happier; you will have two lonely dogs. They seek their human affection. If you don't have enough time for the one you will have even less time with two. I like English Bulldogs but would never own one. A friend of a friend has one, very very sweet but smelly and has all kinds of health problems, which I understand is the norm.
 

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Any well bred English Bulldog (if there is such a thing) will cost an arm and a leg - I have seen $4000 to $10000 - no exaggeration. Which of course is just the start - Bulldogs have super small litters - sometimes 1 - 2 pups only - need a gazillion health tests and C-sections are a must. Also AI since they cannot normally reproduce. To insure one is also going to cost a fortune because health problems are guaranteed - not a matter of "if" but "when" so any insurance company is not going to dole out thousands just because. Any EB that is cheaper than that is from a backyard breeder and even more likely to be a walking pricey nightmare. Dogs are sometimes best friends after years of living together but more likely than not two young pups are going to be like two wild toddlers (sans diapers) running around outdoing each other in naughtiness whilst you are being kept busy as policeman 24/7. If you have hardly any time for one having two is going to make everything worse. I am very sorry to tell you this but this situation has "two dogs abandoned in shelters due to no fault of their own" written all over. Sorry to be so blunt...
 

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Moni I don't think you were blunt at all. I have said over and over again to many people that getting a 2nd dog creates more problems than it solves, especially when both are puppies. Most dogs sleep the day away when their people aren't home, so they aren't really pining away for friends. There are three dogs here in the house with me right now. They are all asleep in separate locations and if I don't move they won't either.



And English Bulldogs are walking health disasters in the making. A now retired colleague used to breed them. One of his dogs drowned in their gold fish pond. The pond was super shallow but the dog couldn't get out and it sank.
 
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Moni, I was reading what you wrote about English bulldogs and was curious so I googled and found Wikipedia’s article on them. OMG what an eye opener. They don’t live very long and are so unhealthy that it’s cruel to breed in my opinion.

My next door neighbor has one that they drag out side to potty. It can barely move and has lesions on its body. Sad looking dog.
 
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Yes it is really bad. I have met a few that despite the fact that they could barely breathe and see and had horrible itchy rashes were surprisingly well tempered - but I have also seen the opposite. They can't really run (not all some manage) some can barely walk, can't breathe have genetic problems up the wazoo. It is a shame because I think they started out as really nice dogs before the excessive breeding towards exaggeration.
 

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I raised two puppies at the same time. Noelle and Francis are about to turn three. I am a dog handler and trainer with over 18 years of experience. I will never do this again. In fact, I will never, ever, ever, EVER raise two puppies at once.

All the bad things about dogs get multiplied and all the good things get subtracted. You don't have one dog peeing on the floor. You don't have two dogs peeing on the floor. You have two dogs taking turns covering each others pee for territorial reasons on your living room rug. We no longer have a living room rug. We no longer own rugs anywhere in the house.

You think the dogs will automatically be best friends, but what if you are wrong? What if they do not like each other? Noelle and Francis used to go together like peanut butter and jelly. As teens, they went together like peanut butter and tuna salad. My dogs fought over every possible thing they could fight over. Francis repeatedly bit Noelle in the face and drew blood. We had to separate them for safety.

Now, at three, they spend 90% of their time apart by choice. Francis and Noelle are not friends. They aren't enemies, thank goodness. Each dog prefers their human's company over dog to dog friendship. Dogs don't really need dog friends. They need humans. If you're worried your dog is lonely, keep up the dog daycare. Don't get a second dog. Just.. don't.
 

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Click thank you so much for being so candid about how it was to have Noelle and Francis as pups together and about their ongoing relations. It is hard to own up to not having all sweetness and light with one's dogs. I have talked about how hard it was raising Lily and Peeves together and also have talked about how long it took before Lily stopped trying to pretend that Javelin didn't exist. Lily and Javelin like each other. Lily and Peeves like each other. Javelin and Peeves do not like each other and Lily stirs the pot of their dislikes. More than one dog is complicated.


Moni I knew there were problems with health in EB, but wow that is way worse than I realized. I also looked at the Wikipedia entry on them after Skylar posted. It is cruel to continue to breed to the current horribly crippled standard. AI and C sections required to continue this way! What nonsense.
 

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The breed needs to become extinct, like pits, imho. I have never met one with a great temperament--they tend to be aggressive. Or at the very least, high energy. They look adorable as puppies, but quickly lose their looks and become ugly and crippled.
 

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You think the dogs will automatically be best friends, but what if you are wrong? What if they do not like each other? Noelle and Francis used to go together like peanut butter and jelly. As teens, they went together like peanut butter and tuna salad. My dogs fought over every possible thing they could fight over. Francis repeatedly bit Noelle in the face and drew blood. We had to separate them for safety.
I can relate to this a little bit.

I brought home my poodle puppy when my mini mutt was about two years old. They got along pretty well, entertaining each other, and giving me more space. Now that my poodle is 8 months old, they are making a habit of making an awful lot of noise "going at" each other. The poodle seems happy, while the older mini mutt does not seem to enjoy the interactions quite so much. While they are not hurting each other, we often need to separate them so that we can hold a conversation. Since the two dogs don't play well together as often, it is up to me to entertain the spunky poodle.
 

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We almost always have four dogs. Some form a close relationship and others do not. Right now Zoe the mini poodle and Opal the Labrador retriever are best buds because they are both young and playful. Cruise, the 12-year-old border collie/whippet is fond of Zoe, but no longer plays with her very often. Molly, the chihuahua, is a loner.


I've enclosed a photo of two of ours (now gone over the rainbow bridge), who really were pals. They both lived to great old age.
 

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@Catherine - absolute heartbreak it must be owning one of them....when I flirted (short-lived) with owning a French Bulldog and started speaking to breeders and all of them told me that they always have to have C-sections (one breeder told me about a litter decades ago that was naturally born like it was a very distant miracle) my DH pulled the plug really fast - as in we will not support that, which is true animal cruelty.
 

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"Molly is 5 months old and she sometimes feel lonely as me & my wife are very busy with our work and seldom have time to play with her.

We often bring her to doggy daycare and she gets very excited when playing with other dogs. That is why I am now considering to buy a second dog to accompany her when I don't have the time to play with her."


Hi

I know that not all the facts are here, so I hope you can forgive how this is going to sound but I am truly puzzled. If you and your wife don't have the time to give to one dog, who is going to raise the addition?

I completely understand wanting Molly to have a playmate, but a second dog can't just be a playmate and babysitter for your first little one.

That is your responsibility when you take these living beings into your life. If DH and I had not been on offset schedules and then retired, we would simply not have considered having two young pups in the house. The amount of work and lack of sleep in trying to raise two at a time is monumental. How will you manage that?

I'm curious too, what caused you to reverse your earlier decision to wait? Has Molly's behavior changed?
 

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I think you have been given some great and some straight shooting advice in this thread by members.

I have just taken on a second pup 5 months ago. I made the decision because I thought it would be good for the first dog who was 1 year old, but also for myself. I've had two pups at once years ago - two sisters and they got along great. But I know not everyone is that lucky.

I went for another poodle similar size because I wanted them to have similar energy levels and play with each other without anybody getting injured. Would a bulldog be a good match with an agile athletic poodle - I'm not so sure? My pups do run around the garden chasing each other and burn off energy which is great. But you still need to train them separately and take them out for a sniff walk for stimulation. I had to do separate training sessions with both dogs. They both heel nicely on their own, but put them together and the young one still pulls and between them I get tangled up and wrapped around like a maypole by leashes.

Also the older dog still comes to me for my attention and stares and barks at me to play her favourite game - which is a flirt pole - so only suitable for one dog at a time to play. So being a person in the middle of this new 2nd dog experiment I would say its not a good idea to get a second dog if you are already short on time. Make just a few minutes to play with your dog. When mine asks sometimes I only give her 5 minutes with the flirt pole. She seems happy with that and trots back inside with me. A little bit of time playing is better than nothing.
 

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I too read the wiki article on English Bulldogs. They are absolutely adorable puppies and are good with kids. However it's very sad to read that the median lifespan is 6 years, maximum 10-11 years. This type of breeding is what makes all purebred fanciers look bad IMO. It's irresponsible to breed animals where C-sections have become the norm.
 

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If you had the time in your life for pets, I would suggest rescuing an adult dog as a companion to your puppy, but it honestly sounds like you do not have time for dogs based on your post. All dogs, even older dogs, need attention from their owners to thrive.
 
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