Poodle Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Good Afternoon All. I have a question regarding a male in a breeding program. I have a toy poodle who turned 1 in March, 2020. I am his guardian home and he will be needed for his first mating around July 2, 2020. I have heard that after a male has his first mating that they are not the same dog with their family and this scares me because I love this little guy so much. He is my only intact poodle. My others are a male toy who will be 2 in July, a female standard who is 9 and a female standard who will be 11 in August. Please telll me what to expect after his first encounter. Thank you for your time.
3ED40C83-5A5A-49C0-BB8D-3403F95138D2.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,554 Posts
The biggest issue, especially with toys, is marking furniture. This is especially likely if there is more than one male dog in the home. I never had a problem with standard poodles, but I certainly did with toy poodles and whippets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The biggest issue, especially with toys, is marking furniture. This is especially likely if there is more than one male dog in the home. I never had a problem with standard poodles, but I certainly did with toy poodles and whippets.
Johanna, Thank you for your reply. I will definitely keep an eye out for this. He had mark a couple of times at one spot previously but I quickly let him know that I didn’t like that and he hasn’t since. But now after his first mating session I will keep a stronger more watchful eye out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
So the "breeder" you are a guardian home for is planning to breed a male who won't even be a year and a half old in July 2020 (since you said he just turned 1 in March 2020)? That alone would be a huge red flag as far as responsible breeding practices...has he even had all his health testing done?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
I've rarely had trouble with males that way but much depends upon the male. An example, my old stud dog (not a Poodle) was a cool customer & a serious dog. He could be in the room with females in heat. He'd indicate to me & I'd say, "huh-uh not for you" & he would go quiet. You'd never believe she was in heat or that he was a stud. My husband's stud was a horndog. I wouldnt trust him with a piece of popcorn if there was a female within as half mile in heat. We had to crate him very securely for his own safety

My dogs were not bad pets because they became stud dogs. Sometimes this happens because owners/handlers permit bad behavior or make excuses for it when really your rules should be the same. If I said down...the dog lies down. Just cause girlie perfume has him all worked up doesn't change the rules. Once the boy gets that, generally all is well. I am kind in that I let a Male have lots of quiet time & bones to sidetrack him & work out his frustration on if I have a female nearby in heat.

I have seen two rare cases where the males became unbearable but cant say its breeding,'s fault. They were Beagles but in my opinion they were not dogs who EVER should have died litters.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
So the "breeder" you are a guardian home for is planning to breed a male who won't even be a year and a half old in July 2020 (since you said he just turned 1 in March 2020)? That alone would be a huge red flag as far as responsible breeding practices...has he even had all his health testing done?
Eclipse, I don’t know all the requirements for breeding programs. I hadn’t plan on getting a puppy at the time I acquired my pup it just happened and I had never been a guardian home before. I thought it was kind of young that’s why I posted on here so I can have some sense on this when I question the breeder. I know he had some testing done but they was before I got him at 13 weeks old. She did say there was more testing to come at 2 and I think she said for the hips and eyes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I've rarely had trouble with males that way but much depends upon the male. An example, my old stud dog (not a Poodle) was a cool customer & a serious dog. He could be in the room with females in heat. He'd indicate to me & I'd say, "huh-uh not for you" & he would go quiet. You'd never believe she was in heat or that he was a stud. My husband's stud was a horndog. I wouldnt trust him with a piece of popcorn if there was a female within as half mile in heat. We had to crate him very securely for his own safety

My dogs were not bad pets because they became stud dogs. Sometimes this happens because owners/handlers permit bad behavior or make excuses for it when really your rules should be the same. If I said down...the dog lies down. Just cause girlie perfume has him all worked up doesn't change the rules. Once the boy gets that, generally all is well. I am kind in that I let a Male have lots of quiet time & bones to sidetrack him & work out his frustration on if I have a female nearby in heat.

I have seen two rare cases where the males became unbearable but cant say its breeding,'s fault. They were Beagles but in my opinion they were not dogs who EVER should have died litters.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
Dogsavvy, Thank you for your insight. I will do my best to keep him occupied if I see him distracted in any negative way. He is such a sweet pup I can’t see him changing in any negative way. He does occasionally hump my female standards who are older but I always yell at him because I think he is bothering them. Thank you for your time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
Eclipse, I don’t know all the requirements for breeding programs. I hadn’t plan on getting a puppy at the time I acquired my pup it just happened and I had never been a guardian home before. I thought it was kind of young that’s why I posted on here so I can have some sense on this when I question the breeder. I know he had some testing done but they was before I got him at 13 weeks old. She did say there was more testing to come at 2 and I think she said for the hips and eyes.
Most responsible breeders don't breed their dogs until they are over 2 and have passed all health testing, there are different tests for each variety. The parent club recommends, at the minimum, the following for toys:
1) DNA Test for prcd-Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) from an OFA-approved laboratory.
2) Yearly Eye Exam by a boarded ACVO veterinary ophthalmologist.
3) Patellar Luxation: OFA Evaluation
Many breeders do additional testing as well. So a breeder who would be breeding a dog not even 1 1/2 is pretty questionable IMO. Sometimes dogs are bred slightly younger than 2 on prelims, but that is not the norm. What is the rush for her to breed this dog? Was he shown in either breed or performance? Is he a finished Ch. or does he have other titles? Does he come from established show lines with titled parents? Most good breeders don't breed randomly they do it to better the breed and further their lines. So someone jumping the gun with an underage dog like this seems rather fishy to me....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Dogsavvy, Thank you for your insight. I will do my best to keep him occupied if I see him distracted in any negative way. He is such a sweet pup I can’t see him changing in any negative way. He does occasionally hump my female standards who are older but I always yell at him because I think he is bothering them. Thank you for your time.
you are welcome. When the humpers start (that's my term for it), I give a sharp vocal. For our dog its "aaaaaaaaT" or (LEAVE IT). By this age they know what it means. Most females would snap him for it but my current 2 working dogs defer to me to correct him unless he bumps into me. The girls know I'm leader & they let leader handle it. All bets are off if he is careless & knocks into me or the tiny dogs. My current boy is 70+ pounds.

If you have a mind set that all is well it will be. Just be watchful


Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,287 Posts
It sounds like you're going to be a good advocate for this little boy and his future litter(s). Speak up to the breeder, express your concerns. Make it clear that you trusted all health testing would be complete before the first breeding, so there must have been a mistake made with the schedule.

I didn't know it at the time, but Peggy's sire was just a baby himself. I now have rather strong feelings on this topic.

Good luck. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
It sounds like you're going to be a good advocate for this little boy and his future litter(s). Speak up to the breeder, express your concerns. Make it clear that you trusted all health testing would be complete before the first breeding, so there must have been a mistake made with the schedule.

I didn't know it at the time, but Peggy's sire was just a baby himself. I now have rather strong feelings on this topic.

Good luck. :)
PeggyTheParti, Thank you. I will do my best to question her and give her my views on what I learned here today, however, since I’m in a signed contract with her not sure how much I can alter the timeline for my little guy. I appreciate everyone’s response to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
Your little guy is so handsome. :) I am sorry you are in this situation and bound with a contract. Hopefully the breeder will do the right thing and wait for all testing to be done to make sure he is an appropriate dog to use for breeding.

Thanks to this forum and other informational sources, people are learning more about the importance of health testing, and they are seeking out breeders who go through the time and expense to do the testing. I have a 9 year old with luxating patellas, so I have learned my lesson. The vet diagnosed him with luxating patellas at his very first vet visit. My options were to send him back to the breeder and get another dog, or keep him and pay for any future medical expenses myself. There was no way I was sending him back to the breeder. He doesn't have the mobility he should at his age, and it's had an impact on his quality of life. That's why this testing is just so important.

I wish you luck with all of this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,291 Posts
My boy Sam has been bred 4 times (yes -- he has been tested and has a CHIC number). I noticed no change at all after he was bred and he certainly does not pee in the house! I don't think you will see any changes. Here's Sam (cream) and his first girlfriend (blue). Photo taken either right before or right after they were bred.

467663
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top