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Olive, black miniature poodle, 9 months old
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Hi,
Lately we are having a bobcat problem in our community. There have been many bobcat signs and sightings in our neighborhood. Yesterday night one neighbor informed me that there was a bobcat in her yard at around 11 pm. I am worried about that bobcat attacking my small dog, Olive. What detergents or humane traps could I use?
Thank you,
Olive Love
 

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If bobcats are your local neighbors, not much you can do. They naturally live around you and trapping them won't change that. I wouldn't leave a very small dog outside unattended. Even without bobcats you still have hawks.
 

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Olive, black miniature poodle, 9 months old
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If bobcats are your local neighbors, not much you can do. They naturally live around you and trapping them won't change that. I wouldn't leave a very small dog outside unattended. Even without bobcats you still have hawks.
I think the bobcat in our yard is the same female bobcat. I am trying to humanely capture that bobcat.
 

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The only option I can think of is calling your local wildlife department and asking if they can relocate the bobcat, the problem is that sometimes once they have established a territory they may come back.
 

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You won't accomplish anything by trapping the bobcat. Even if you relocate it, another will likely move into the territory.

My suggestions:

Notify your local wildlife services.
Make your property inhospitable.
Never leave small dogs unattended.

 

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Bobcats, as furbearing animals, are probably subject to hunting and trapping regulations in your area. You could set yourself up for some stiff penalties for trapping one without appropriate permits.
 

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I would definitely call wildlife control, and keep Olive supervised outside at all times even if they trap and remove it.

You're in Calgary, right? When I was in Alberta, we had a 15 lb dog and she also couldn't be left outside. We saw hawks circling a few times, and coyotes were always a risk. They have been known when hungry to dig into a fenced yard!

Here's a news story that seems to imply they only deal with them if they are posing a risk, and has the number to call.

 

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I am of the viewpoint that local wildlife has a right to live in habitats surrounding houses. As the newcomers to the area, it is up to us to be respectful of them and find ways to accommodate our needs. We have local foxes in our area even though we live in a city. We never leave our rabbit unattended out in the yard because I do not think it is safe for him. But trapping the foxes never came to mind. It is their home too. We are thrilled whenever we have the chance to see one. I would worry very much about relocating an animal. They have homes the same way we do. Moving an animal means it is likely to attempt to return, endangering itself in the process. They have trouble establishing new territories if relocated. It can be a death sentence to relocate them. Often times, animal control does not have the permission to release trapped animals and will simply euthanize them. I would not contact animal control.

If the bobcat moved into your neighborhood, it is highly unlikely that it is a rogue animal that ventured far from home to establish a new territory in a human development. Likely there is not enough local habitat left to accommodate the bobcat population, and so they are being pushed into residential areas. So I do think it is likely there are others around that would replace it. This may simply be a particular bobcat that is unusually unafraid of people. They are typically very shy animals.
 

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The scent of something they're wary of will discourage them.
So keep a wild bearskin in the closet and drag it around your yard after every rain. ;)
Or... have the males of the house urinate around the edges of the property. Two-legged and four legged...
Or... sprinkle human hair around the edges, or all over. The scent is what counts.
My sister's yard backs right against a mountain. She's been bringing her dogs in for 30 years now.
Best of luck. :)
 

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We live in the foothills close to many square miles of national forest. There are bears, bobcats, coyotes, and mountain lions in the area. Hawks and eagles work the high side. Our doggie door opens into a small pen (about 12 feet square) that has high fencing. The old border collie accompanies the Chihuahua and the mini poo when they go out at night. This seems to work well, but we are going to need another protector eventually - the border collie will be 15 in January.

We also have a large area that is securely fenced, but we do not let the small dogs out in that area unless we are with them. A five foot concrete block wall would not deter a coyote, bobcat, or mountain lion.
 

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I live in an area where you wouldn't expect to see a lot of wildlife, and I also have a fenced in backyard, but my dogs have never been allowed to go outside alone/be left unattended. We've seen coyotes in the street at night, and a fox lived in the neighborhood and frequently showed up in our backyard. When Jasper was a puppy, we had a hawk hanging around the backyard and so Jasper never got to run off-leash outside. My dogs are never allowed off-leash in the backyard at night.

I would just suggest being aware of your surroundings, always keep an eye on her, and never allow her to run off-leash at night.
 

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Olive, black miniature poodle, 9 months old
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Discussion Starter #12
We live in the foothills close to many square miles of national forest. There are bears, bobcats, coyotes, and mountain lions in the area. Hawks and eagles work the high side. Our doggie door opens into a small pen (about 12 feet square) that has high fencing. The old border collie accompanies the Chihuahua and the mini poo when they go out at night. This seems to work well, but we are going to need another protector eventually - the border collie will be 15 in January.

We also have a large area that is securely fenced, but we do not let the small dogs out in that area unless we are with them. A five foot concrete block wall would not deter a coyote, bobcat, or mountain lion.
Hi,
I like the idea of a having larger dog with a small dog. Sadly since I find it hard to control a large dog this is not possible in my situation but it is a good idea if you find having a large dog sutible.
 

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When I first moved to this neighborhood, an elderly neighbor met me walking my last Scottie, Charlie. He was a dog lover, and warned me to never let him walk around our fenced (!) property at night because of coyotes. Our next door neighbors actually reported to us that had found a coyote den on their property! They had them moved. In fairness to the coyotes, the neighbor’s house was on a heavily wooded lot, across the street from Buffalo Bayou where they usually range. I’ve encountered them on the street at night. However, wolves, bears, bobcats are next level and I would accompany my poodle everywhere, with weapons:sprays, whistles, billy clubs, name it... Sorry you have such big threat predators for which a poodle might be prey.
 

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Beau 1yr old Mini Poodle
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Ok I had to ask my Dad about this one. When I was growing up we lived surrounded by woods, and we had livestock (cows and rabbits), cats, dogs, and of course little kids. Our woods were left wild and relatively unmanaged so we had a lot of wild life including predators . . . coyotes/coydogs, bobcat, even a black bear.

Anyway I knew my Dad treated our property (yard and cow pasture) with something but I couldn't remember what, thankfully he could remember. He said he tried a couple of repellent products but what worked the best was something called Predator Pee. According to my Dad it worked really well, and in truth I do remember that we had very few problems with the predators. In fact the only real problems we had were coydogs, but that's another story.

I found this website and I showed it to my Dad, and he says this is the same product he used.
Original Predator Pee Predator Urine Since 1986

He also said and I quote "You have to make your yard inhospitable. Remove any and all hiding spots, no bird feeders, garbage cans, water buckets, etc left outside. Maybe try motion activated lights, or a motion activated sprinkler."

Good Luck 🤞
 

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I live in what is now a pretty populated area. We occasionally still see deer, coyotes and last week a bobcat was spotted.I never have my dogs outdoors unattended so I don't much worry about them. I feel they have a right to live their lives too and I enjoy seeing them, even thoThey can be noisy . As the cooler wether approaches I know soon we will see the coyotes passing thru the neighborhood. I think all you can do is keep your property manicured and supervise your dog at all times.
 

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The only local predators that really scare me are bears and mountain lions, because both will take on a human when they get habituated to people. I respect our local coyotes, but for the most part they are content to go their own way and stay out of my fenced yard. Bears will rip out a screen and come inside when they get really bold. Fortunately our mountain lions have all been shy transients so far.
 
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