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I'm wondering if you have bloodwork done annually on your poodle at the vet during the well visit if your dog is healthy? I'm not sure if this is something that everyone does annually for their poodles, or only when you are testing to solve a health issue. Our vet recommends it but it's pricey and not sure if it's necessary if your poodle is well. Thoughts?
 

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I'm wondering if you have bloodwork done annually on your poodle at the vet during the well visit if your dog is healthy? I'm not sure if this is something that everyone does annually for their poodles, or only when you are testing to solve a health issue. Our vet recommends it but it's pricey and not sure if it's necessary if your poodle is well. Thoughts?
Yes!!! Plus an ultrasound of the internal organs and x-rays looking for potential problems. The ultrasound revealed a problem that was corrected after putting Alf on a specific medication regime for 18 months.
 

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If you can afford it, yearly blood work is highly recommended. The basis for this is to see what your dog's healthy baseline is, most important for the kidney (creatinine, BUN) and liver (ALT, ALP, GGT) values. A lot of these values are only elevated outside of the normal range if a high percentage of organ function has been lost, and knowing baseline values helps us mitigate this limitation. For example: let's say your dog has a creatinine of 0.5 or so for a few years, and then the next time you do bloodwork it has doubled to 1.0. While 1.0 is still in the middle of the reference range (so not elevated and not a red flag normally), the fact that it doubled could be significant and would warrant further investigation.
 

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If you can afford it, yearly blood work is highly recommended. The basis for this is to see what your dog's healthy baseline is, most important for the kidney (creatinine, BUN) and liver (ALT, ALP, GGT) values. A lot of these values are only elevated outside of the normal range if a high percentage of organ function has been lost, and knowing baseline values helps us mitigate this limitation. For example: let's say your dog has a creatinine of 0.5 or so for a few years, and then the next time you do bloodwork it has doubled to 1.0. While 1.0 is still in the middle of the reference range (so not elevated and not a red flag normally), the fact that it doubled could be significant and would warrant further investigation.
Plus resting thyroid levels and a heart worm blood test if you are in an area where mosquitoes are a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you can afford it, yearly blood work is highly recommended. The basis for this is to see what your dog's healthy baseline is, most important for the kidney (creatinine, BUN) and liver (ALT, ALP, GGT) values. A lot of these values are only elevated outside of the normal range if a high percentage of organ function has been lost, and knowing baseline values helps us mitigate this limitation. For example: let's say your dog has a creatinine of 0.5 or so for a few years, and then the next time you do bloodwork it has doubled to 1.0. While 1.0 is still in the middle of the reference range (so not elevated and not a red flag normally), the fact that it doubled could be significant and would warrant further investigation.
Thank you for this detail, very helpful!

Plus resting thyroid levels and a heart worm blood test if you are in an area where mosquitoes are a problem.
Agreed! I always do the heartworm and lyme/tick borne illness disease tests. Heartworm terrifies me. I breathe a huge sigh of relief when it comes back negative.
 

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Definitely something I would consider as my animals age, but less so when they are young and healthy. So many values can bounce around according to what the dog has recently eaten, minor infections, etc, etc. Heartworm is not endemic in the UK, thank heavens, so that is one less thing to worry about.
 

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Are regular X-rays safe if there's no suspected injury or illness?
Baseline X-rays at an early age can identify any potential back or joint problems and to alter behavior to eliminate or minimize future issues. From the patio, my young Sheltie would jump up to a raised flower bed, take a step and jump again to the elevated dog run instead of using the easy climb steps on the other side of the yard. An X-ray revealed a potential disc problem. I planted a wide Sego palm in the flower bed forcing her to use the steps if she wanted to access the dog run. Monitoring x-rays dictated the need for meds over the years. This kept her very active until the day she died of an undiagnosed blood pressure problem. Kept her free of pain and free from limping.
 

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Baseline X-rays at an early age can identify any potential back or joint problems and to alter behavior to eliminate or minimize future issues. From the patio, my young Sheltie would jump up to a raised flower bed, take a step and jump again to the elevated dog run instead of using the easy climb steps on the other side of the yard. An X-ray revealed a potential disc problem. I planted a wide Sego palm in the flower bed forcing her to use the steps if she wanted to access the dog run. Monitoring x-rays dictated the need for meds over the years. This kept her very active until the day she died of an undiagnosed blood pressure problem. Kept her free of pain and free from limping.
I get that, but I worry that X-rays come with their own problems. I'll talk to my vet about it.
My boy tested positive for IVDD (on Embark, not confirmed by vet) so he'll likely need an X-ray soon anyways.
 
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