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That is a great article. However, I think it would be unwise to completely discount Bloat as a genetic condition since you can see it bounce down the generations in some lines and not in others.
 

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Wow. Very interesting. My first standard poodle bloated three times in the 1990's and it IS very scary (and expensive). Thanks for (re)posting this.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That is a great article. However, I think it would be unwise to completely discount Bloat as a genetic condition since you can see it bounce down the generations in some lines and not in others.
I agree, but perhaps we and more than anything the scientific community, should look at the physical structure in some lines versus others. Of course, if it is simply genetic it would be great to have a test...............
 

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I agree, but perhaps we and more than anything the scientific community, should look at the physical structure in some lines versus others. Of course, if it is simply genetic it would be great to have a test...............
My Sabrina is a good case for genetics....

She is not particularly big, not that deep or narrow chested, and she is not a worry wart, nervous dog. She bloated in the middle of the night when we were all home. She was 8 yrs old.

I have now tracked down at least 5 full and half siblings who have bloated. It was intimated to me by another breeder that there are probably more. None are listed on PHR (mea culpa... mea culpa). It should be noted that while my girl's sire never bloated, his mother did while at a dog show. They went on to breed her anyway.

Ahhh.... the sins of the father.....
 

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My Sabrina is a good case for genetics....

She is not particularly big, not that deep or narrow chested, and she is not a worry wart, nervous dog. She bloated in the middle of the night when we were all home. She was 8 yrs old.

I have now tracked down at least 5 full and half siblings who have bloated. It was intimated to me by another breeder that there are probably more. None are listed on PHR (mea culpa... mea culpa). It should be noted that while my girl's sire never bloated, his mother did while at a dog show. They went on to breed her anyway.

Ahhh.... the sins of the father.....
You hit the nail on the head! Until breeders list these things on PHR we have to hang people by their wrists before we can get a straight story and know which line is having what problem. Bloat and Addison's are high on the list because we can't "really" test, not genetically...
 

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bloat prevention

There have been a great number of posts about bloat on this site--stories of bloat, whether it's genetic, etc. so i thought it might be useful to mention that i had preventative surgery done on my 2 standards years ago when they were several years old.

the surgery involves stapling the stomach to a rib--which is what is done after bloat, assuming the animal survives.

it was expensive (as i recall, about $1200 per dog), but both my husband and i had had experiences with bloat and those was very scary.

it happened to us once when were we camping in Yosemite. the dog jumped into the van and, boom, the stomach started expanding. we were lucky to race down the mountain and find a large animal vet who operated immediately. the dog survived, but the experience got us thinking that there might be prophylactic surgery that is safe.

anyway, i realize this sort of thing is a personal decision but i thought i'd mention it. we were glad to have it done, and both dogs recovered in a matter of days.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
There have been a great number of posts about bloat on this site--stories of bloat, whether it's genetic, etc. so i thought it might be useful to mention that i had preventative surgery done on my 2 standards years ago when they were several years old.

the surgery involves stapling the stomach to a rib--which is what is done after bloat, assuming the animal survives.

it was expensive (as i recall, about $1200 per dog), but both my husband and i had had experiences with bloat and those was very scary.

it happened to us once when were we camping in Yosemite. the dog jumped into the van and, boom, the stomach started expanding. we were lucky to race down the mountain and find a large animal vet who operated immediately. the dog survived, but the experience got us thinking that there might be prophylactic surgery that is safe.

anyway, i realize this sort of thing is a personal decision but i thought i'd mention it. we were glad to have it done, and both dogs recovered in a matter of days.
I had to assume there had been chats about bloat before, but bloat and Addison's especially are in such murky waters that I believe it pays to revisit. The surgery you mention is often called "Tacking" and yes, it's very expensive. I recommend to those who buy my pet pups that they have it done when they have the Poodle neutered or spayed (one anesthetic so it's less stress on the dog and even less expensive combined). On a breeding animal I'm really SO torn because when we tack them we artificially "hide" any bloat tendency, so we merrily go along and can honestly say that there's no bloat in our line, but we know nothing about what would be happening related to bloat in our line if we had not interfered so to speak. I do so wish researchers would discover a cause that can help solve all this.
 

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My vet is going to tack Lucy's stomach when I have her in for her spay surgery next month. I have no idea how much extra she's going to charge me for the procedure (I didn't ask and it really doesn't matter), but I'd rather have it done while Lucy's already under anesthesia and she'll only have one abdominal incision from which to recover... She hasn't ever bloated and I'm hoping she never will (with or without the prophy) but I'll do what I can to keep her safe and healthy.
 

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I had the preventative surgery done on my first poodle too, but it didn't prevent him from bloating. It preventing the "twisting", but not the bloating.
 

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it was expensive (as i recall, about $1200 per dog), but both my husband and i had had experiences with bloat and those was very scary.
Was that $1200 for a routine Gastropexy (tacking)? If so, that is highway robbery! After Sabrina bloated, I spayed and tacked her daughter. The total cost was around $550 (about $250 was for the tacking).
 

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Was that $1200 for a routine Gastropexy (tacking)? If so, that is highway robbery! After Sabrina bloated, I spayed and tacked her daughter. The total cost was around $550 (about $250 was for the tacking).
Difficult to believe it can differ THAT much regionally????? I seem to remember that it was around $300 35 years ago in Carmel, California (spay and tack).
 

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Here is what I know in SC. If it is done with the spay/neuter - it was MUCH cheaper. To go in and have the tacking down alone it cost about $800 - $950.
 

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I really wasn't concerned about bloat.:doh:.just thought it was one of those rare things that could happen. After losing Randy I am very paranoid. Also after hearing it is alot more common and can cause death I am going to have Greta done when she gets spade and getting Cooper done at the same time. Although he has already been neutered, I feel that if it is something I can prevent then it is worth it to have him done too. I want to do them at the same time so they can recover together.
 

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Wish I could move : ((( !!!!

Anybody looking for transfer to the Bay Area :) LMAO !!!! ( you must be on a "shrooms" to do so LMAO)
 
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