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We have raised two Toy Poodles over the past 15 years but have decided to get a Standard next. We pick up Oakley at the end of June. We have never had to worry about Bloat but from what we read we need to with the larger dog. I spoke to vet about it (I was doing a bit of research) and was told they recommend a surgery to have the stomach attached to inside lining of dog to help with this issue. (Sorry but I don’t remember all the technical terms). Vet said to have this done at same time as the neutering. Anyone have words of wisdom about this? Experience? Good? Bad?
Thanks!
 

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Tacking the stomach is a common recommendation. I didn’t do it for Pogo, but I'm strongly considering it for Galen.
 

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It is called a gastropexy. It is commonly done at the time of desexing. We have not had it done for any of our dogs, 2 standard poodles and a German Shepherd dog. They are 11, almost 12 and just turned 5, no problems for any of them. Bloat is not common, but needs to be dealt with very quickly. Gastropexy won't prevent bloat, but it does minimize the rapidly fatal complicated form of it which is bloat with gastric torsion where the stomach twists on itself and blood flow is blocked and tissue dies.
 

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The tack is called a prophylactic gastropexy. I had both of my bitches tacked when I spayed them. I don't spay until my bitches have gone through a heat and their growth plates have closed, so they were each around 20 months when they were done. That way the stomach is also fully grown. I would not do a tack on a dog that was not fully matured. Bloat is way more common in Standards than many people believe or know. They are almost always listed in the top 10 breeds at risk. Males seem to be slightly more at risk. I lost my first Standard to bloat/torsion many, many years ago. At 13, she was not a surgical candidate and I will never forget how she suffered until we were able to get to the vet and have her evaluated. And how grateful I was to be able to euthanize her to end her suffering. Tacks were not really talked about when I had my next Standards, but with the two I have now, my breeder recommended it, and I discussed with my vet who also believes in doing a preventative tack (on high-risk breeds only of course). A gastropexy will not prevent bloat, but it should prevent torsion which is what most dogs who bloat have complications with, which can lead to them not surviving the actual incident or the required surgery to address (which will be a tack anyway). You will still need to get to a vet ASAP for bloat, but should have a much more favorable outcome. Spend some time on various poodle FB groups as opposed to this one and ask for people's experiences with bloat. As noted, you will see just how many more times it happens than people are aware of. I figure it there is anything I can do to stack the odds in my (and my dogs' favor) I'm going to to it. As with any medical decision, it is your choice, but do some research on opinions of those who have been through it.
 

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My childhood spoo died of torsion at only 5.5 yrs old, which is why I had Mia pexied when she was spayed at 2 yrs old. Four years ago, Mia's sire died at 10 yrs old of torsion. While there is no evidence of genetic predisposition for bloat or torsion, his death hit home and I feel even more secure in my choice. Mia had no complications from the surgery. Although I haven't needed to use them, I keep a few tabs of Gas-X on hand, because, as said above, she can still bloat but will not torsion.

IIRC approximately 4.4% of spoos will experience bloat, and having had one experience, they are more likely to have additional episodes (I don't know the rate of recurrence). If the dog doesn't receive medical care quickly, the stomach will flip, necrosis will start, and the dog cannot be saved. How quickly? I've read within 15 minutes, but I don't know how it's possible to notice the onset of bloat and then get the dog to a vet that quickly, so I don't trust this statistic. I haven't seen better numbers. Suffice it to say, you need to act fast. Gas-X will give you a little time and may save the dog's life, but you still need to rush.
 

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My Irish Setter died at age ten from bloat. When I got my standard poodle I free fed him in order to avoid bloat. He nibbled throughout the day. He died at age eight of bloat.

After that, I did as much research as I could. I eventually decided to feed my next dog raw. From the time he was 11 weeks old, he was on predator raw and only ate kibble when we travelled or otherwise found it difficult to feed raw. I have also fed all of my foster dogs raw. Border collies are not uncommon around here on farms and my vets are familiar with them, three of them having borders and loving them. I was told that the longest lived of them was 14 years old. Until he was about 14, his teeth were nice and white. My border collie died at age 16 1/2 years.

It is not for everyone, it costs a little more than a high end kibble, but I would never feed anything else.
 
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