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Is there such a thing as light blue? So almost silver? Because I saw a photo on Poodle Forum of a Peggy twin that turned out super light. I wish I could remember the user name....
A single copy of the gene will give blue. Two copies of the gene will give silver. There's a fair amount of variation on how light each one gets.
 

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Is there such a thing as light blue? So almost silver? Because I saw a photo on Poodle Forum of a Peggy twin that turned out super light. I wish I could remember the user name....
Yeah there is for sure differences in how light blues are as well as a range in silvers. I know you can't really tell how dark they'll end up until they finish clearing though.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I think she could end up blue. If her sire is a brown then he would not have been able to contribute a fading gene, but she could get to one from her mother (poodle colors are much more confusing than the other breeds I know colour genetics on, but I believe cream is red with fading).
Her dam was brown and her sire was a sable. Her muzzle is getting browner everyday. I think she most likely will be a blue if that’s what the brown muzzle means. If not then it sounds like she may just be black. This color-changing game is quite the guessing game.
 

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Her dam was brown and her sire was a sable. Her muzzle is getting browner everyday. I think she most likely will be a blue if that’s what the brown muzzle means. If not then it sounds like she may just be black. This color-changing game is quite the guessing game.
Sorry that was directed to Peggy!
In your pup's case, if her mother was brown she would not have a fading gene and therefore can't pass one on. The sable is a lot harder, the few I have seen it would be really hard to know whether a fading gene is present or not since the sable causes them to lighten up a lot anyways (and depending on hair cut). I'm not sure if there is a way to tell.
I'm certainly interested to see how your pup looks after her next haircut though!
 

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I have a blue and they are very slow to change colors, unlike the silvers that fade rapidly. Raven was not her full color until age 3. Now I believe Wren may be fading too. I was sure he was black but now his hopes and back look more charcoal. They are interesting to watch. I remember seeing pictures of a another member’s s male tuxedo spoo that was black and white who eventually became blue and white and I was so shocked. He had been very black.
 

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A single copy of the gene will give blue. Two copies of the gene will give silver. There's a fair amount of variation on how light each one gets.
I am not sure that is correct. Most of the color genetic information that I have seen says that blue is a black poodle with the gene for dilution (restriction of melanin in the hair shaft)
 

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I am not sure that is correct. Most of the color genetic information that I have seen says that blue is a black poodle with the gene for dilution (restriction of melanin in the hair shaft)
I think it's theres some vocabulary confusion. The word blue is used to describe the color produced by two different genes. One blue gene dilutes black. The puppy is born blue with a grey nose. Think blue doberman or blue pitbull. It's a recessive; the pup needs two copies of the gene. There is a test for carriers.
The other blue gene fades black. The puppy starts out black with a black nose and gradually gets lighter, retaining its black nose. It is thought to be an incomplete dominant. A single copy causes the dog to lighten up over several years. Two copies makes the dog start lightening younger and end paler. To my knowledge the testing companies haven't nailed it down enough to make a test yet; I suppose it's possible they haven't because everyone misunderstood the mechanism. ¯\(ツ)
 

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I think it's theres some vocabulary confusion. The word blue is used to describe the color produced by two different genes. One blue gene dilutes black. The puppy is born blue with a grey nose. Think blue doberman or blue pitbull. It's a recessive; the pup needs two copies of the gene. There is a test for carriers.
The other blue gene fades black. The puppy starts out black with a black nose and gradually gets lighter, retaining its black nose. It is thought to be an incomplete dominant. A single copy causes the dog to lighten up over several years. Two copies makes the dog start lightening younger and end paler. To my knowledge the testing companies haven't nailed it down enough to make a test yet; I suppose it's possible they haven't because everyone misunderstood the mechanism. ¯\(ツ)
To the best of my knowledge, the first type does not exist in poodles.
 

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To the best of my knowledge, the first type does not exist in poodles.
I'm not aware of it either. Probably a good thing, as it is associated with alopecia. The breed doesn't need another source of alopecia.
 
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