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My 3y old standard poodle female has during year and a half lost her beautiful black color. It slowly started from her tail, back and rib area. The head is still black. She is SA-tested last year and does not have SA symptoms, the skin itself is in good condition. She does have certain food intolerance, but it should be in control.

I am still not sure what is causing this, all her sisters do have good coat color still, why is she fading?
First I thought her coat is just sensitive to the sun, but the situation is the same in winter time and in my country we have long dark snowy winter. Please tell me if there is anything else to do than trying black coat shampoos.
First 3 photos of my girl, the last one as an comparison of sister.
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Sister :
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In poodles, black does crack. Not always, and not always the same way. Blacks may gray or brown, white hairs will spring forth, and the color will change over time. You didn't do anything wrong, nor did she. C'est la vie avec les caniches. As for her littermates, give it time and you will find gray and white hairs on them as well.

If it really upsets you, and you cannot stop yourself from seeing natural color change as a defect, then conformation folks use a variety of tricks and tools to blacken the coat. The AKC has information for repairing sun-damaged coats that may be helpful in limiting natural color fade. I've seen shoe polish used in rings and heard whispers of hair dyes and color sprays.

Blackening shampoo used to be a gimmick. Whitening shampoo has blueing agents that heighten the appearance of white, and people demanded a similar shampoo for their black dogs, so manufacturers changed the label on their regular shampoos and thus blackening shampoos were born. I cannot say whether there is any science behind the current crop of blackening shampoos, but they are popular.

In time, all colors fade except white. Your dog is gorgeous and her coat is exquisite. You obviously take tremendous care to keep her looking her best, which I would argue, she is.
 

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Bad luck with genetics I suppose. Littermates are not identical so they have different variations of the genes inherited from the parents. They are not all going to age the same way.

If you want to use some producta as @Liz suggested then I would check your national kennel club regulations (Finland correct?). Some of the practices used in AKC and other countries are frowned upon or even banned elsewhere.

It might still be sun bleaching, if there is a lot of snow the sun rays reflect of the snow and ice and can become very strong. Even in cloudy weather.
 

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Thanks for the addition, @curlflooffan . I hadn't realized by response sounded as US-centric as it did.
To be fair its not technically US centric as these norms and regulations vary HUGELY within Europe too.

@SaJastus I am happy to see a fellow Nordic and European on here. Can I ask you to post some more pictures? since most PF members are from the other side of the Atlantic I don't think they get to see an undocked poodle in show coat very often. We need more full-tail representation on here :love:
 

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Agreed! Love the full tails.
By the way, please no judgement for this question... but does anyone know if dying a dog black can be a viable and healthy option? I've always been curious, as us humans often dye our hair with little to no negative consequences (depending on the person) and natural dyes do exist, such as henna. Obviously what is safe for a human can be toxic for a dog and I'm not suggesting we should stop loving our dogs when their appearances change... it's just something I've been curious about!
 

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Agreed! Love the full tails.
By the way, please no judgement for this question... but does anyone know if dying a dog black can be a viable and healthy option? I've always been curious, as us humans often dye our hair with little to no negative consequences (depending on the person) and natural dyes do exist, such as henna. Obviously what is safe for a human can be toxic for a dog and I'm not suggesting we should stop loving our dogs when their appearances change... it's just something I've been curious about!
They do make hair dye specifically for dogs. Probably similar to human hair dye. Its a lot of work to dye a dog, then rinsing it off without damaging your bathroom and towels with dye as your dog shakes the wetness off. Is your dog patient and trained to sit quietly for a time while you apply dye and let it sit to work?

You would also have to deal with roots as the hair grows out which would l odd.

I don’t think it’s worth it unless you had a very special reason for it such as you wanted professional photo graphs.
 
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She may be turning blue. Some blues take a very long time to clear. I got my male at age 2 and appeared to be a black mismark, but he developed a “rustiness” or “off -black” to his coat in places within that first year with me. He is now 3.5 and very much turning blue. He is fairly grown out right now but I suspect when he gets cut down this spring he will be quite blue.
 

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Your poodle looks like mine did at that age. Poppy was all black until about age 2 when she began changing to blue...very much like your lovely poodle. Now at nearly 5 yrs old she has gotten much lighter. The color change is all about the genes they inherit. I rather enjoy the blue now that Poppy has changed. I was not so sure if I liked it at first, but I love her no matter her color .
 
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