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Hi all

I'm looking for some advice on trying to reduce the biting issue we seem to be encountering with our 6 month old boy. In order to try to reduce the biting (which at times is forceful enough to draw blood as his baby teeth puncture), we've tried distraction techniques and applied them consistently one at a time so not to confuse him starting initially with putting one of his toys in front of his mouth which did nothing, we've tried increasing volumes of 'ouch' with no success, we've tried time outs for every time he bites which have been consistently applied and no sooner is he back out of time out than he bites again. Each time he bites we put him straight back to time out where he is isolated in a separate room until he exhibits calm behaviour. Nothing is working. We can't work out the triggers as such because it seems to be entirely random. When he calms down and exhibits the good behaviours we reward with his praise words of 'good boy' and we treat as appropriate. He is an active puppy and has many mental stimulation toys to play with, gets regular play and training times and walks to burn off energy so we really don't think its a boredom issue. Any thoughts on the usual causes for this and potential remedies would be appreciated as we are now fast running out of ideas.

Thanks
 

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Ok why don't you join recaller.com, Susan Garrett is having a free mini series right now and it may help you. Watch each video, she released video #2 yesterday which I think may be helpful in teaching your boy to be more calm. It will only be up for free for a limited time I am finding it helpful with my older boy.
 

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I have raised so many puppies over the years my mini-poodle was the mouthiest dog ever. I came here to these forums many times being exhausted and frustrated with all the biting.
Several things - he must be at the worst phase with teething right now - once he has his adult teeth the biting will cease almost completely. So most of this is due to the need for extensive chewing and or seeking comfort. I found my boy to be at his worst when he was super tired - and all the training we did would sink into the background - some of his gnawing on us was almost like a need for a pacifier and falling asleep.
What saved our hands were old towels which I cut into halves rolling into sausages made wet and then froze and frozen chicken feet and wings. I raw feed so giving raw bones is a natural thing for me. The chicken feet saved my poor hands. That is one of his pacifiers dangling out of his mouth...
 

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You are in evil bite-y phase part two, when the puppy is teething molars. Evil bite-y phase two is worse than evil bite-y phase one because the puppy is bigger and can do more damage. But, the cause is the same: teething!

A few things to try.

#1. Never touch the puppy unless you offer a bully stick first. Everyone in the house has a long bully stick. Sit on the floor, offer the bite stick, wait for the chomp, then you can pet the puppy while you hold the other end of the chew stick. Praise the puppy for chewing the stick, maintain a calm demeanor. The game is: bite this stick and be calm with me. This calm behavior will probably last between 5 seconds to one minute. If you get more than one minute, that's a bonus.

#2. If the dog lets go of the bully stick, or won't take the stick at all... Shark attack warning. Throw the stick and a few treats on the floor. Leave the area and go get...

#3. Toy on a rope. Tie a six foot length of clothesline to a fluffy toy. Make a large knot in the other end for the humans to hang on to. Dangle the fluffy thing just out of reach. Drag the fluffy thing on the floor. Encourage the puppy to chase, pounce, bite, attack, and try and murder the fluffy thing. Play tug and more tug. And praise, praise, praise. Toys are for attacking, not people. And the rope is long enough to keep your clothes and hands safe.

#4. Before the puppy gets bored, and before your arm falls off, drop treats on the floor. Put the fluffy toy away. Never leave the toy on a rope with the puppy due to strangulation risk.

#5. Watch your puppy. Still cranked up? Leave the area for three minutes, come back and offer the chew stick. If not cranked up, offer a chew stick right away and quiet petting.

Your puppy needs to learn chew sticks are for chewing, not people. Toys are for attacking, not people. Alternate between high energy behavior (attack the toy) and calm behavior (chew and get some love). Your puppy needs to learn how to modulate between high energy behavior and calm behavior. He doesn't know how to do that yet, so you'll have to teach him.

The evil bite-y phase part two will go away in a few months once the molars come in. It's hard and it hurts to be bitten, so always offer something to bite before you touch the puppy. Continue using time outs when you need a break. Play up games with the toy on a rope and down time with a chew stick and petting.
 

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What Click said! Be patient, this will end.
 

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Oh, and one important thing, your puppy will most likely need to pee after playing tug! So, after play, go outside for a pee break on a leash. Wait for the piddle, praise, go inside and have some quiet chewing while petting the puppy practice.
 

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I always wore long sleeves and jeans when interacting with my Tasmanian Devil during that dreaded phase. I wore, and still do, a fishing vest that had a tug toy, treats, leash, flashlight and waste bags. Luckily, I don’t need to pack the tug toy anymore. Buck was especially bitey when he was tired or bored. A flirt pole with a thick leather lure help drain energy and pull teeth:) Standing like a statue, or loudly saying “ouch!”, did not work for us. Timeouts, distractions and protective personal attire helped.
 

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Aah puppies. My standard was a biter my arms really looked bad as he would jump and snag my skin with those sharp teeth. They seemed to get caught on everything my clothes too. But one day it stopped. He is a mouthy player but nothing like he was. Just keep up the work. I found these bones from Dentley helpful in occupying him, I found them in PetMart they are stuffed femur bones. They last forever but I do throw them away as some of the filling I think may go bad with age plus the bone itself starts to splinter, I also use Yak bones, large, well my dog is a standard but I get them as big asw I could, when they get small I soak and microwave them and when cool they are all puffy n light and he eats that too or sometimes I just throw away the small ones so that he can't choke. It does get better.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks for all of your suggestions everyone and what a lovely picture Moni. Interesting that you found the biting was bad once tired and also that the training went out the window .....we are finding the same! We find with our little one that he just will not rest and snooze. He will happily lie on the couch eyes shut but certainly isn't snoozing as the second someone gets up he's immediately eyes open looking round and moving around. He actively fights not to snooze. Never once has he just snoozed off and stayed snoozing while we get on around him. He seems to go through phases in an evening of cranky tired to hyper to cranky tired all of which includes biting. We'll persevere with the timeouts and the distraction techniques and invest in a flirt pole to see if that helps him. Glad to hear it does get better because right now it feels like it will never end.
 

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Asta was very much a biter when he as a puppy. Seems my arms were always a mess from those sharp puppy bites. He did outgrow it when he got his adult teeth. Never bites now, so hang in there and work with the techniques others here have suggested.
 

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You might consider using an x-pen with a comfy bed and bowl of water in it, or a crate containing a comfy bed. Just like with many little toddlers, puppies can need help learning to relax and nap.

If you put this in a nice space near you but off to the side from traffic somewhat and use that for naptime, it might be good for him. Even in a different room eventually just for naps (not saying he shouldn't sleep in your room at night; my pets always have full access to my room at night, though I know not everyone is so inclined).

He seems like maybe he might need to learn to relax with you in the area yet not directly right next to him. Good to start practicing quiet leaving and returning to the home itself, if he's not already starting to get that down :).
 

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Asta was very much a biter when he as a puppy. Seems my arms were always a mess from those sharp puppy bites. He did outgrow it when he got his adult teeth. Never bites now, so hang in there and work with the techniques others here have suggested.
Hi, you always seem to have good advice. What would you suggest for a big, energetic 2 year old Standard Poodle who seems to have taken up mischievous biting of clothing and nipping of people when he plays? He adores people, loves to play and I Am trying to figure out why this behavior is escalating during the past 2 months. He is excited, or craving attention, or just playing too rough. Some success in giving him a toy to carry instead, warning him with NO just makes him crafty and he sneaks behind and nips. He has lightning fast reactions and yelling and slapping his muzzle is nearly impossible - he just dodges and lands a nip on my backside! He has had the run of a big farm for most of the past 2 months, is a happy, affectionate playful dog who has lots of people who play with him and lots of interesting things to do .

Sent from my STV100-3 using Tapatalk
 

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When ever he bites pick him up and put him in "time out", an enclosed room or crate with no toys or food, for around 3 minutes. Take him out and act like nothing happened. Do this every time and he will learn that biting means playing ends.
 

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This thread is over 12 months old - with luck the bitey puppies have outgrown that particular game!
 
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