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Stella - Standard Poodle
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I've been teaching my pup about proper bite force. They say that if your pup bites a bit too hard, say ouch. The only thing is, for me, saying ouch is the same thing as a squeaker on a squeaky toy- it doesn't work. It just makes her even more 'bitey'. Any tips? When I redirect her or walk away, it usually works pretty well. Sometimes, she'll just try to follow me and nip at my heels.
 

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That phase was rough for us, you're not alone.

Making sure puppy has enough nap time can make a difference. Cranky + bitey was never a happy time.

Try to create a nap environment like you might a preschooler. (Close the blinds, dim the lights, don't make any sound, "Alexa play calm music").
 

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The "ouch" also didn't work for us in this stage. What worked for us was a short time out in her crate if she couldn't be redirected to a toy. She still mouths sometimes (5.5 mos) when she's excited but isn't relentless about it and is a lot gentler. She mostly outgrew getting really "bitey" once she discovered other ways to have fun. Now that she's older and we have better communication, if she mouths me when playing I can give an "ouch" or a gasp and it is usually effective.
 

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I don't think I know anyone for whom squeaking out an ouch worked. My best suggestion is to tuck your hands in under your elbows (arms crossed), look up and away from the pup and do nothing. Puppies don't engage boring and that posture is boring.
 
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I would say ow! But actually make it sound like it hurt, and immediately throw up my hands and go to the bathroom and shut the door for 30s to a min. If that happened a few times in close succession, then I would put the dog in the crate. I am not sure saying ouch helped (it just filed her up further until i started going away) but it made ME feel better, and she does react to it as an adult, so perhaps that helped. The time out also meant there was a consequence (play ended, human left) and gave me time to calm down.
 

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I don't think I know anyone for whom squeaking out an ouch worked. My best suggestion is to tuck your hands in under your elbows (arms crossed), look up and away from the pup and do nothing. Puppies don't engage boring and that posture is boring.
Lol I've done this before. I wasn't sure if dogs can read closed human bodylanguage. I assume you know better then me. Sometimes Ill also frow my eyebrows and pout my lips like an upset kindergardener and tell Basil, "I don't want to play with you anymore" for dramatic effect.

(I worked with school-age kids for 9 years)
 

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I don't say anything since that is part of my boring routine. I can't say ouching and acting hurt doesn't ever work. I just have not had puppies around that it worked with.
 

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Peggy has always responded instantly to sounds of real pain, which tells me poodles are too smart for these silly ploys.

My preferred method is some variation of this: Redirect to a wiggling toy. Doesn’t work? Remove eye contact and go boring. Doesn’t work? Remove yourself calmly and count to 30. Doesn’t work? Nap time!
 

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Yelping only winds my pup up more. I have had puppies in the past it worked very, very well for. Starla just thinks we’re adding to her game though.
 
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