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When we got our 2 toys, they were barely 6 weeks old (their mom died in an accident ) and had no bottom or top front teeth - only canines and a few molars. I got them an old table to chew on (which looks like crap now). They tethers in it and were minimally mouthy to us. Just mainly liked to softly nibble our fingers. I've never had this problem, but if it were me I'd be pulling my hair out too. We have several chew toys. Hopefully something will work or you. They recently got their "big girl teeth" and i gave them the table again to chew. I can't wait until all the adult teeth are in. :)


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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Hahahahaha i wish she'll catch up to my no-biting-hints soon. Urm.. what if she actually bites hair too ? I have long black hair which she ALSO likes to attack on. Most of the time i tie it but sometimes i lay on the floor and she..well she comes and chew and bite on my hair

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There have been a few postings in age and when left the litter. Have you considered some socialization? Harry had some good socialisation before he came to me but I kept it up w puppy day care. Am sure the older dogs kept him in check as whenever he came home he was better and less nippy( butwould slip back to his old ways v quickly!)


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It's a kennel with over night boarders and has a day care centre. Dogs mingle and play together. Harry was their youngest as he started about 14weeks and had to pass a basic test and had to have had his vaccines. It was good for me as work during the day and found the the puppy routine with going home for lunch, nighttime wake up was killing me. It took some pressure off me and he loved going.

I don't know many dog owners so it gave Harry a chance to mingle with other dogs.


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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I exercise cherry regularly. Since she hasnt fully vaccinated yet. I let her run around the house instead. I have a big house so i usually throw the toy shoe for her to run after. She doesnt like playing ball. What other games do all of you with with your poodle ?

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Wow! I feel for you. I'll be going crazy if I have this problem. I have two puppies, toy poodle, and they don't bite. Charlie nipped us when he was a puppy but Edison doesn't do that at all.

I really don't know how to stop your puppy to bite you but I do know what puppy likes so you can use what they like as a distraction from biting you. Why don't you get a bully stick? Get the one that's braided. Dogs can't ignore animal product. Every time she bite you, yell loud "ouch" and give him the bully stick instead. You can also try this, whenever she bite you, put her in her x-pen. This is to teach her that biting is not allowed and every time she does it, she'll get isolated from the pack. Please do not mistake this for a punishment but only a way to give her a time out and acknowledge to her that isolation is a reward for any unwanted behavior.

As a puppy, Charlie loves to nip at our heel, this is so annoying. So my husband would drop things on the floor to distract him from our heel. This is actually another annoying behavior for me who likes to keep clean and neat floor. BUT this dropping things on the floor works for Charlie. The things you drop would be slice of apple, cheese, treats, etc. This goes on for months until he stops paying attention to our heels and more looking up at us anticipating yummies drop from the sky. Today Charlie is 16 months old and I still find my husband dropping slices of apple for him. Charlie gets over nipping but husband seems to like dropping things on the floor for Charlie. Hahaha

Hope this helps.


P.S. having own two toy poodles, I learn that these breed is in love with their human and in love with freedom, therefore to stop any unwanted behavior, I will isolate and limit their access to me, my husband and their freedom. It works like a charm. They learn so fast that when they don't please you, they lose access to you.

P.S.S. if she bite the wall, spray bitter apple on the wall. Charlie bites wall too and bitter apple put him off biting walls. Daily treat of bully sticks help him to satisfy his chewing tendency.
 

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Bitter apple is a wonderful thing...haven't needed it at all for my poodle puppy but I have used it for years for other dogs. You can spray it on anything you don't want chewed on (although you may want to try a test spot on some fabrics first)...my golden retriever was almost 12 years old when we lost her to cancer and hadn't tasted bitter apple since she was a puppy, but even at that age, if you picked up the bottle she would start to sneeze and shake her head.

It is a great option to make the improper chewing self-correcting rather than you having to actively intervene.
 

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This is awesome information! I have 10 and 11 week old poodles, and they are doing the same thing! The poo mix is more aggressive than the spoo. I sometimes wonder if she is trying to bite to hurt... she even grows and twists her body like the devil when I hold her up to make her stop! I don't know if this is normal or not...but the spoo doesn't do that. She is much calmer and I can tell she is just teething. The mix also nips at the spoo, but because the spoo is much bigger, she is able to hold her own, but they do get in big growl fights...any advice?
 

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If you guys are really having that much trouble, then finding a professional would be the way to go. There's no way people over the internet can tell you what's going wrong with the training.

As a professional myself, I would only recommend other professionals I don't know from the following databases.

Search for Professionals

The Pet Professional Guild - All Members

http://www.academyfordogtrainers.com/sc/Academy_Graduate_Referral_List.pdf

https://www.karenpryoracademy.com/find-a-trainer

Find Dog, Cat, Parrot and Horse Behavior Consultants | IAABC

Truly Dog Friendly Truly Dog-Friendly Trainers
 

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this thread reminds me of two stories re teaching bite restraint. my male lowchen knew that after a full brush out, he was to get a treat. being a foodie, his way of urging me to "use those hands for what they were meant for - feeding your dog" was to go after my hands and kind of nip at them, though without really biting. when i brought a second, older lowchen into my home, she turned out to be the dominant dog. she also had the easier to groom coat. so i brushed her out first. one evening, having been brushed, the female was up on my mother's bed. i was at the foot of the bed with the now brushed out male, who was going after my hands. all of a sudden, there he was, pinned by the neck against the dresser by the smaller but dominant female. i believe she thought he was attacking me. it has now been almost eight years since my female lowchen had to be put to sleep. to this day, the male has never repeated his "use your hands to get my treat" routine.

the other story is about a friend of mine. she had tiny dogs - i have no idea what they were, maybe a pom-chi mix? in any case, she told me that she taught her pups not to bite by biting them back if they nipped her! i was stunned, but it worked for her.

this is not to urge cruelty of any kind. but i do think a way has to be found to teach a pet dog it is never all right to put teeth into a human, mostly because if you have a dog, you have to protect it. a dog that bites a human - except in self defense - and even then - is susceptible to a demand that the dog be removed or put down. this happened where i live and it was very sad both for the person who was bitten and the owner of the dog - both nice people.

sorry to sound preachy, but i ended up ferrying the bitten individual back and forth to the doctor several times for follow up care and also talked to the dog owner's wife the evening of the attack. at that point, she and her daughter were both traumatized and clearly afraid of their once-beloved family pet.
 

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the other story is about a friend of mine. she had tiny dogs - i have no idea what they were, maybe a pom-chi mix? in any case, she told me that she taught her pups not to bite by biting them back if they nipped her! i was stunned, but it worked for her.

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Directly after college I managed to land my dream job as a zookeeper. At the zoo we had 2 hand raised baby chimps which required hands on care several times daily...moving them from their night quarters to the viewing area for daytime, bottles, diaper changing, playtime, etc. For those who have never been fortunate enough to have been bitten by a chimp...let me tell you even a young one bites HARD and can do a lot of damage. When I first started working at the zoo the chimps of course tested me, often, and I was told the best way to assert yourself with them was to BITE THEM BACK...yuck! I have to admit I could never bring myself to try that one...
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
The time-out works !!! :D it really does !! Cherry is now improving. I bought her a few more toys and when she bites me, i say no biting and put her back into the cage. Slowly she is getting what i want. Cheers :D
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Directly after college I managed to land my dream job as a zookeeper. At the zoo we had 2 hand raised baby chimps which required hands on care several times daily...moving them from their night quarters to the viewing area for daytime, bottles, diaper changing, playtime, etc. For those who have never been fortunate enough to have been bitten by a chimp...let me tell you even a young one bites HARD and can do a lot of damage. When I first started working at the zoo the chimps of course tested me, often, and I was told the best way to assert yourself with them was to BITE THEM BACK...yuck! I have to admit I could never bring myself to try that one...
Was this a while ago? I thought handlers were required to wear face masks. I can't believe people were actually biting the chimps... Wow!
 

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Was this a while ago? I thought handlers were required to wear face masks. I can't believe people were actually biting the chimps... Wow!
It was 13 years ago. We certainly didn't wear face masks or any other protective gear when handling any of our animals....I have no idea what the requirements would be now.
 
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