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Discussion Starter · #221 ·
Thanks everyone for your support through all of it ! It has helped tremendously, even more when I was discouraged.
 

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This is really fabulous news. What a journey!!

Now that the underlying allergies are under control, if Becky’s anything like Peggy, eliminating glycerin might fully resolve the anal gland issue. We’ve seen such a dramatic change, but I know all dogs are different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #224 ·
It's great that you know for sure. So what specifically is she allergic to?
There isn’t much she isn’t reacting to. We’ve tried dozens of animal proteins, soy, corn and probably others I don’t remember. I’ve tried dozens of regular kibble, with or without grains, raw meat, kibbles for sensitive stomach, hydrolyzed protein, freeze dried, vegetarian food, vegan food, name it.

The only food she tolerates is Royal Canin anallergenic, which has ingredients that don’t even look like food…. But it’s from the vet and she is doing very well on it. Nice, small stools, shiny coat. And also fruits.

I won’t be trying much more foods, since it’s very hard on her and myself. This year has been very demanding and I’m glad it’s over. Right now she has enough foods to eat that her life isn’t boring. She has a bit of variety and is happy. :)
 

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Oh. I thought when you said the dermatologist confirmed it that meant something like she had a positive reaction from a specific allergy test. Like when people try to figure out what they're allergic to (multiple injections of various allergens). How did the dermatologist come to the food allergy conclusion? Glad she's got a fair variety of foods she can eat! Been a tough year!
 

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Discussion Starter · #226 ·
Oh. I thought when you said the dermatologist confirmed it that meant something like she had a positive reaction from a specific allergy test. Like when people try to figure out what they're allergic to (multiple injections of various allergens). How did the dermatologist come to the food allergy conclusion? Glad she's got a fair variety of foods she can eat! Been a tough year!
No, there are no food allergy tests that exist for dogs, according to my dermatologist (she has training and work experience in US so I suppose it’s the same in the states).
 

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Discussion Starter · #227 ·
Beckie has been licking her bum and scratching a lot for the past two weeks. I hadn’t given her cytopoint shots for more than 2 months as I was testing her to see if she needed it. That was the last thing that needed testing. Her glands were emptied on may 27th, but she smelled fishy 2 weeks later and I emptied them myself on june 11th. Then again today by the vet tech. So that’s 3 times in less than 3 weeks. These are all signs of allergies.

So now I guess I have my answer. She also has environmental allergies and she needs her cytopoint. I think I’ll keep her on a 4-5 weeks schedule for the summer and 6 weeks in the winter.

She also had her annual check-up and heartworm and Lyme disease testing. All was good. :)
 

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Not the answer hoped for, but an answer that can be lived with. Hoping for calm waters for you all :).
 
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Discussion Starter · #229 ·
Update : the cytopoint seemed to help Beckie a little bit, but barely. Almost two weeks later, she was still continuously licking. So I figured I would try Apoquel, even though it didn’t help last summer when we tried it for 2 weeks.

My reasoning was maybe it didn’t help because at the time I was doing my own personal food trial and she might have been reacting so much to the food that what the Apoquel improved was masked with more intense reactions from the food.

So I got her Apoquel 3 days ago. Given twice a day for a week, then once a day. So far so good, fingers crossed it’s not just a coincidence. This stuff is very expensive, more than 4$ per pill. I’m so happy I have insurance. I’m still not used to it and almost forgot to bring my claim form…

So if the Apoquel works, that means my little devil not only is allergic to most foods, but she also has seasonal allergies. Who would have thought ?

The remaining question now might be : are the cytopoint injections really necessary ? I’ll have to do more testing on that one.
 

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Beckie is so lucky that you are carefully working through all the options for the best solution.

There’s a level of peace and comfort once you have all the pieces of the puzzle in place so everything is optimal for Beckie and she’s not suffering from those darn allergies.
 

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Here is a blurb I found,


What is Apoquel and why is it one of today’s more popular treatment options for allergic itch?
One of the advantages of the oral treatment Apoquel is that it’s nonsteroidal and takes effect quickly. Apoquel targets specific cytokines (proteins) that lead to itch and inflammation. It comes in tablet form and is given daily, providing relief for 24 hours. Apoquel cannot be used for dogs under one year or breeding, pregnant, or lactating dogs. Apoquel side effects are reportedly rare (less than 1 dog out of 10,000 treated), but may include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, anorexia, or blood work changes. Apoquel has been safely used with other common medications such as antibiotics, parasiticides and vaccinations. Your vet, with your input, can determine if Apoquel might be right for your pet.

Cytopoint Injections are another leading treatment option for allergic itch.
The advantage of Cytopoint is that one injection can start controlling your pet’s itching usually within a day, and can provide relief that lasts for 4 to 8 weeks. It’s safe to use in dogs of any age and can be used with various medications. Cytopoint will not put pressure on your pet’s liver or kidney because it is not chemical-based. Instead, it’s an antibody that blocks the itch signal in your pets nervous system. As with Apoquel, side effects are reportedly rare, but your vet will determine if this medication is right for your particular fuzzy family member.
 
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