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Discussion Starter #1
I have mentioned before how Ginger sits at the window on my sun porch and barks at anything that moves - its starting to really drive me crazy. Now I know that dogs bark - but how do I train her to STOP WHEN I TELL HER TO! That is what is really bothering me. I dont' want her to not warn me but i want her to stop when I tell her. I have tried so far:

shaking a can with pennies
squirting her with water
going up to her and leading away from the window and telling her "no bark"
taking her muzzle in my hand saying no bark
doing all of the above saying "no bark" or 'No" or 'out" as I was taught by trainer,
saying "friend" as the trainer told me etc.
Does anyone have any other suggestions.

By the way - she will stop sometimes when I use these methods but she will go back and do it again. Do I have to go to her each time (forever?) or is there some way to train her to listen when I say -stop - no whatever you think is what I should say!

Spoofan - you are a trainer - can you help? thanks
 

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I have found the best way to teach any of my dogs not to bark when told not to is to block them physically from the area where they are barking, like looking out a window, etc., telling them "no bark" and each time they bark or even buff I step toward them and make them back up further away from what they want to bark at. I don't "release" the dog until he/she is calmed down and not attempting to bark, buff or even look intently at the area they want to go and bark in. I don't touch the dog with my body, just step in front of them when they want to move back to the spot they want to bark or move toward them to force them to back up and tell them "no" or "no bark". I say nothing to them IF they are quiet, but just stand in front of them till their body relaxes and their attention is diverted from what they want to bark at. My toy poodle had started this at home recently and he is already "getting it" about when I say "no bark". He still sometimes persists if he is all wound up but I just quietly block him if he does and force him back each time he makes a noise and the amount of time it takes him to calm down and be quiet is getting extremely short now.

When I am out in public and my toy poo barks at another dog, I immediately make him move in another direction and tell him "no" or "no bark" and then make him sit quietly and watch the other dog. IF he gets over excited while looking, I make him turn around or move away with a leash correction and repeat the process, when he sits and watches the dog with a relaxed attitude I give him lots of praise and, if the other person is willing, I then allow him to visit the other dog. His problem with barking at other dogs is that he gets overexcited about wanting to visit with the dog, so he is not allowed to visit till he is showing a calm attitude. Yes, this takes time, but it is very productive time. I have only been doing this with him for a couple weeks now and he is already stopping with only a couple corrections and making him sit. He is getting the idea that he can have what he wants IF he is calm.

So, I suggest you keep at it. It is not an overnight fix, but you will find that your girl will get quiet down quicker and quicker as time goes on, you will not have to do it all of her life..lol. BUT, you may well have to "remind" her once in a while. The thing is, you should not allow her to go back to wherever she wants to be till she is calm and IF she calms down then goes at it again once back to where she wants to be, then you need to repeat the process till she is quiet looking out the window. Then she should be praised. It does take time, but it is time well spent and all of a sudden you will realize that you aren't having the problem anymore. Oh, and if you won't have time to correct her, like you will need to go to work, I would not let her get into a place where you know that she will have to be corrected. It is better to not allow the situation to happen when you don't have time to deal with it so she can learn.

Best of luck with her. I am sure she will settle down well with consistent reminders of what you want from her. :)
 

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I have mentioned before how Ginger sits at the window on my sun porch and barks at anything that moves - its starting to really drive me crazy. Now I know that dogs bark - but how do I train her to STOP WHEN I TELL HER TO! That is what is really bothering me. I dont' want her to not warn me but i want her to stop when I tell her. I have tried so far:

shaking a can with pennies
squirting her with water
going up to her and leading away from the window and telling her "no bark"
taking her muzzle in my hand saying no bark
doing all of the above saying "no bark" or 'No" or 'out" as I was taught by trainer,
saying "friend" as the trainer told me etc.
Does anyone have any other suggestions.

By the way - she will stop sometimes when I use these methods but she will go back and do it again. Do I have to go to her each time (forever?) or is there some way to train her to listen when I say -stop - no whatever you think is what I should say!

Spoofan - you are a trainer - can you help? thanks
Whatever made you think,that I am a trainer???
Didn't I mention before that Gunther has me wrapped around his little paw pinkie?
Kidding aside...the daycare Gunther goes to uses this method...when a dog misbehaves they immediately go to the crate for 1 minute.
The owner says she finds it highly effective...no idea why.
I have used the spray bottle in the past,but added some vinegar to it.
I am sure some of the real trainers here will offer more advice.
 

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I have found the best way to teach any of my dogs not to bark when told not to is to block them physically from the area where they are barking, like looking out a window, etc., telling them "no bark" and each time they bark or even buff I step toward them and make them back up further away from what they want to bark at. I don't "release" the dog until he/she is calmed down and not attempting to bark, buff or even look intently at the area they want to go and bark in. I don't touch the dog with my body, just step in front of them when they want to move back to the spot they want to bark or move toward them to force them to back up and tell them "no" or "no bark". I say nothing to them IF they are quiet, but just stand in front of them till their body relaxes and their attention is diverted from what they want to bark at. My toy poodle had started this at home recently and he is already "getting it" about when I say "no bark". He still sometimes persists if he is all wound up but I just quietly block him if he does and force him back each time he makes a noise and the amount of time it takes him to calm down and be quiet is getting extremely short now.

When I am out in public and my toy poo barks at another dog, I immediately make him move in another direction and tell him "no" or "no bark" and then make him sit quietly and watch the other dog. IF he gets over excited while looking, I make him turn around or move away with a leash correction and repeat the process, when he sits and watches the dog with a relaxed attitude I give him lots of praise and, if the other person is willing, I then allow him to visit the other dog. His problem with barking at other dogs is that he gets overexcited about wanting to visit with the dog, so he is not allowed to visit till he is showing a calm attitude. Yes, this takes time, but it is very productive time. I have only been doing this with him for a couple weeks now and he is already stopping with only a couple corrections and making him sit. He is getting the idea that he can have what he wants IF he is calm.

So, I suggest you keep at it. It is not an overnight fix, but you will find that your girl will get quiet down quicker and quicker as time goes on, you will not have to do it all of her life..lol. BUT, you may well have to "remind" her once in a while. The thing is, you should not allow her to go back to wherever she wants to be till she is calm and IF she calms down then goes at it again once back to where she wants to be, then you need to repeat the process till she is quiet looking out the window. Then she should be praised. It does take time, but it is time well spent and all of a sudden you will realize that you aren't having the problem anymore. Oh, and if you won't have time to correct her, like you will need to go to work, I would not let her get into a place where you know that she will have to be corrected. It is better to not allow the situation to happen when you don't have time to deal with it so she can learn.

Best of luck with her. I am sure she will settle down well with consistent reminders of what you want from her. :)
Very good advice!!! This is how we trained Chloe to stop barking when told. Even if she is out in the back yard and barking a long with other dogs, we just tell her quiet and she'll stop the barking. She really is a wonderful girl.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Whatever made you think,that I am a trainer???
Didn't I mention before that Gunther has me wrapped around his little paw pinkie?
Kidding aside...the daycare Gunther goes to uses this method...when a dog misbehaves they immediately go to the crate for 1 minute.
The owner says she finds it highly effective...no idea why.
I have used the spray bottle in the past,but added some vinegar to it.
I am sure some of the real trainers here will offer more advice.
You know I think I got you mixed up with wonderpup!
Wonderpup - are you there?
advice is good - I have tried this and it works but the problem still exists. i could be sitting here ont he computer and she is calmly looking out of the window behind me and all of a suddent that loud bark almost makes me jump out of my skin! She is not obeying me and that is what concerns me. She obviously dosnt trust me to make the judgement that we are safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Also, Teddy is a good boy and listens pretty well - msot of the time lol - but he looks at me and at Ginger and decides to follow her. I have tried everything - being calm assertvie etc but she does not trust me. she has this darn fear thing
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just right now she is calmly checking ther perimeter - watching for the cat or the dog across the street. I wish I could block my windows. I have these really long - almost to the floor - windows on the sun porch - four of them - and it is very hard to keep her away. We are close to the road and it is perfect for a dog like her to just sit and watch. I tried blinds but she foudn out she could see thru them! too smart!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
more - lol
sometimes we are in the back of the house in my bedroom where I am resting and all of a sudden they are up like the start of a race to the front and the windows and barking like maniacs. I have to close my bedroom door and I don't like doing that - it shuts me off from the rest of the house. In the night I don't mind but in the day I don't like to do that. It's so quiet right now you can hear a pin drop - but it won't be long. another thing they both do is when they hear my son coming up the stairs they do the same thing and go flying into the kitchen barking until they see its him. I guess they are good watch dogs and if I ws alone I would appreciate them doing this - its just that there should be some way I could release them form it you know?
 

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Better late then never

Sorry I avoided this post, as is a habit of mine with training posts. - sorry-

Ok here goes, (remember you asked for it), so this is likely to be long, get comfy. :p

First off, it isn't a super grand idea to correct or punish a dog for barking in ummmm about 95% of cases. If you're out for a walk and a dog and it barks and you correct or punish, you run an extremely high risk of teaching that dog that whatever he is barking out means something unpleasnant is on the way. This creates a couple of lovely problems in some dogs. Better to redirect the dog's focus and teach them that 1)that other dog isnt bad so just don't worry about him 2)hey look another dog, do I get a treat, toy, petted..... ?? He'll look to you for something and likely be happy about it, instead of expecting to be told NO and pulled in the other direction.

Everyone is different Pam, but I am not a huge fan of physical correction be it with your hand, or a leash. Thats the lazy way out and really doesn't teach the dog much. I would argue that fact with my last breath. Teaching through fear or pain is going to eventauly come back to bite you, maybe literaly.

I might try a completely different set of tactics wich will probably seems counter productive to you. Have you ever heard a trainer say that you should teach a dog to speak before you teach him to be quiet? It makes sense, teach Barking so you can teach no barking.
Jazz will bark at the fence, and out the window of the shop, and occasionaly on the table if somebody comes in. Obviously I don't mind a few barks, espeicaly if I am alone. I like the warning. I got a big dog for the big bark since I am home alone so often. I to needed a way to stop the behavior after I had been warned.

So, pick a word that is going to mean the end of barking. *rule - you aren't allowed to pick a word with NO in it* (sorry) I like words like Thankyou, enough, or anything else you can think of.
Have a leash and treats handy. If you use a marker like a clicker, whistle, or a verbal cue, which I would strongly suggest, have that ready too.

The next time she barks, use your word, and get her attention with a treat. Sanp a leash on her if you have to drag her away from the window :) Mark the behavior (if you're using a marker) when she turns her attention from the window to you. You want her to think that everytime she needs to bark at something outside she should get something yummy inside (use dog food if you're worried about her getting fat). You may have to do a few obedience cues to keep her interested in you for a bit instead of wanting to go straight back to the window.

Now I know, it sounds like you are rewarding bad behavior, but the goal here is for her to bark at something outside, warning you it's there, and then come running over to you when you tell her that'll do.


Method two/ what to do next
Time out
If you aren't interested in the above training, you can also try time out. Use your stop barking cue, and if she doesn't don't say another word take her by the collar and without any fuss say time out and put her in her crate. Use no emotion in your voice when you say time out. This is NOT punishment, her crate is not a bad place. It's just, I need a break, you need a break, go here. Make sure she doesn't have anything fun in her crate like a bone or a toy. I fyou sent your kid to time out in his room and he had an xbox to entertain him would time out be effective? No. Same deal with the dog. Time outs are no more than 3 minutes (provided the dog isn't barking), and you when you let them out all if forgiven no hard feelings. Like hitting the reset button. You don't make a big deal about of letting them out though, no good girls or anything like that. Just let her out. If she goes right back to the window and starts barking she goes right back in time out for another 2 or 3 minutes.
You can also use time out after the initial reward if she won't stop going to the window and barking so both methods can be combined.

Keep this in mind though, that training away from this behavior is going to take a while. She's been allowed to continue for long enough to make it a habit and we know habits are hard to break. Aside from that, your previous efforts to stop her were ineffective and she's learned she doesn't HAVE to stop. So she is going to be twice as determined to bark out that window. The behavior may be worse before it gets better. Thats OK, thats how you know you're really getting through. It's a sign that they are making one last huge effort to hang onto the behavior thats worked for them for so long.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sorry I avoided this post, as is a habit of mine with training posts. - sorry-

Ok here goes, (remember you asked for it), so this is likely to be long, get comfy. :p

First off, it isn't a super grand idea to correct or punish a dog for barking in ummmm about 95% of cases. If you're out for a walk and a dog and it barks and you correct or punish, you run an extremely high risk of teaching that dog that whatever he is barking out means something unpleasnant is on the way. This creates a couple of lovely problems in some dogs. Better to redirect the dog's focus and teach them that 1)that other dog isnt bad so just don't worry about him 2)hey look another dog, do I get a treat, toy, petted..... ?? He'll look to you for something and likely be happy about it, instead of expecting to be told NO and pulled in the other direction.

Everyone is different Pam, but I am not a huge fan of physical correction be it with your hand, or a leash. Thats the lazy way out and really doesn't teach the dog much. I would argue that fact with my last breath. Teaching through fear or pain is going to eventauly come back to bite you, maybe literaly.

I might try a completely different set of tactics wich will probably seems counter productive to you. Have you ever heard a trainer say that you should teach a dog to speak before you teach him to be quiet? It makes sense, teach Barking so you can teach no barking.
Jazz will bark at the fence, and out the window of the shop, and occasionaly on the table if somebody comes in. Obviously I don't mind a few barks, espeicaly if I am alone. I like the warning. I got a big dog for the big bark since I am home alone so often. I to needed a way to stop the behavior after I had been warned.

So, pick a word that is going to mean the end of barking. *rule - you aren't allowed to pick a word with NO in it* (sorry) I like words like Thankyou, enough, or anything else you can think of.
Have a leash and treats handy. If you use a marker like a clicker, whistle, or a verbal cue, which I would strongly suggest, have that ready too.

The next time she barks, use your word, and get her attention with a treat. Sanp a leash on her if you have to drag her away from the window :) Mark the behavior (if you're using a marker) when she turns her attention from the window to you. You want her to think that everytime she needs to bark at something outside she should get something yummy inside (use dog food if you're worried about her getting fat). You may have to do a few obedience cues to keep her interested in you for a bit instead of wanting to go straight back to the window.

Now I know, it sounds like you are rewarding bad behavior, but the goal here is for her to bark at something outside, warning you it's there, and then come running over to you when you tell her that'll do.


Method two/ what to do next
Time out
If you aren't interested in the above training, you can also try time out. Use your stop barking cue, and if she doesn't don't say another word take her by the collar and without any fuss say time out and put her in her crate. Use no emotion in your voice when you say time out. This is NOT punishment, her crate is not a bad place. It's just, I need a break, you need a break, go here. Make sure she doesn't have anything fun in her crate like a bone or a toy. I fyou sent your kid to time out in his room and he had an xbox to entertain him would time out be effective? No. Same deal with the dog. Time outs are no more than 3 minutes (provided the dog isn't barking), and you when you let them out all if forgiven no hard feelings. Like hitting the reset button. You don't make a big deal about of letting them out though, no good girls or anything like that. Just let her out. If she goes right back to the window and starts barking she goes right back in time out for another 2 or 3 minutes.
You can also use time out after the initial reward if she won't stop going to the window and barking so both methods can be combined.

Keep this in mind though, that training away from this behavior is going to take a while. She's been allowed to continue for long enough to make it a habit and we know habits are hard to break. Aside from that, your previous efforts to stop her were ineffective and she's learned she doesn't HAVE to stop. So she is going to be twice as determined to bark out that window. The behavior may be worse before it gets better. Thats OK, thats how you know you're really getting through. It's a sign that they are making one last huge effort to hang onto the behavior thats worked for them for so long.
Thank you so much Wonderpup - I have printed your post and will try it. I already tried praising her for stopping this morning and she seemed very happy - I need to come up with a word. the original trainer used 'Out" instead of no but somehow - I don't know - I don't always remember to use it. I have used time out with her - if I say crate - she stops - sometimes. The biggest test will be when people walk by - lol she goes crazy then. I agree that I don't want her not to bark - because i feel safe when alone - but I want her to submit to me when I say enough. Maybe I shoudl try "enough" what do you think? Thanks!
 

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If "Out" is the equal to No in your vacab then it wouldn't be a good choice for this. Enough is a good one, as it Quiet, and Thankyou. I personaly use Thankyou for my "drop it/give cue.

Alter your mindset a tad if you can. You aren't praising her for being quiet you are first praising and rewarding her for the barking since you don't want to stop the behavior entirely. After that you can reward her for sifting her attention to what she is barking at to you. Take discipline out of the equation in your thought process. Definitly DON'T name the time out thing, don't threaten her with it either. Just do it. It's either thankyou very much for barking, that'll do though so shift off and come hang out with me and be quiet. OR go to time out with no warning at all. Make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wonderpup thank you so much! I can't belive that she is already responding. I go to the window and say good - and then friend (if it is the folks across the street - I don't say friend to strangers cause I don't want her to think everyone is a friend )- and I pet her then I say enough and pet her and she is responding! Can it be that easy? ha ha ha - the true test will be when people walk by. haven't used the treats yet - need to get some of those liver treats that I used to train her initially - before the weekend when we get the walkers and bikers lol! Thanks so much!

Oh, PS - when she is outside and barks - I let her or call her in and she usually comes. that ok?
 

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I like the word enough and use leave it for other things.

Sting has now become a bad barker (and now fence fighter) at the new neighbor dogs. He used to ignore the other dogs surrounding us but we have new neighbors that allow there two chihuahua's to bark almost 24 hrs a day and fence fight at me or my dogs constantly...just by us walking by or being outside. Yep, another case of just let our Chuhuahua's do as they please because they are small crap. Errrrrr!

Im going to try the Wonderpup training technique and reward him for redirecting his attention to me when I say enough. I was planning to take the easy way out and buy a bark (shock) collar by the weekend. I'd rather try this technique anyhow. Thanks Wonderpup!

I'll report back soon as this is a daily issue now. lol
 

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Jazz barks in the backyard when we aren't out there, I''ve been considering a bark collar for her, probably the spray kind. Honestly if it comes down to an zapping her with a shock collar or irritate the neighbors.... I'll irritate the neighbors and just double dawg dare them to complain... I can be kind of a bitch I'm told *looks innocent* I don't understand how people come to that conclusion....

Keep in mind Jen, that you may have to use a leash, in your case I would suggest a long line to MAKE him redirect his attention.

Both of you need a mark of some kind that is different from praise, I use a verbal "Yes" in moderate tone of voice, a clicker, or a dog whistle.

Oh speaking of whistles.... actualy you can use a whistle, like a regular one doesn't have to be the doggie kind, to teach come when called... that could be a great way to get your dog's to redirect focus AND come to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Jazz barks in the backyard when we aren't out there, I''ve been considering a bark collar for her, probably the spray kind. Honestly if it comes down to an zapping her with a shock collar or irritate the neighbors.... I'll irritate the neighbors and just double dawg dare them to complain... I can be kind of a bitch I'm told *looks innocent* I don't understand how people come to that conclusion....

Keep in mind Jen, that you may have to use a leash, in your case I would suggest a long line to MAKE him redirect his attention.

Both of you need a mark of some kind that is different from praise, I use a verbal "Yes" in moderate tone of voice, a clicker, or a dog whistle.

Oh speaking of whistles.... actualy you can use a whistle, like a regular one doesn't have to be the doggie kind, to teach come when called... that could be a great way to get your dog's to redirect focus AND come to you.
That sounds good - I usually whistle for Ginger and Teddy when I want them to come in and they do - occasionally Ginger is busy barking at the negihbors and I have to call her. But the barking at the window! Wondrpup I can't believe it - this morning she started to bark at the neighbor across the street and stopped ON HER OWN! when I came into the room I praised her - wow I can't believe this - she must have really been wanting my attentions. I have neglected her a little since the surgery. Love that dog!!! Of course Teddy gets in there for his pets too at the same time but somehow I iknow ginger knows that its mostly for her for being good.
 

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That sounds good - I usually whistle for Ginger and Teddy when I want them to come in and they do - occasionally Ginger is busy barking at the negihbors and I have to call her. But the barking at the window! Wondrpup I can't believe it - this morning she started to bark at the neighbor across the street and stopped ON HER OWN! when I came into the room I praised her - wow I can't believe this - she must have really been wanting my attentions. I have neglected her a little since the surgery. Love that dog!!! Of course Teddy gets in there for his pets too at the same time but somehow I iknow ginger knows that its mostly for her for being good.
LoL, see she's a good girl LoL.
Careful that you don't teach her to bark in order to get your attention though. Have her do a couple of sits or a down or something so you have more than one thing to praise her for :)
 

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ok that sounds good. Now last nite we had our first episode with a car in driveway - it was my grandson and his mother but she didnt get out so Ginger was very intent on barking at the car - I came over and praised her for her warning and then tried to get her to stop but she was intent -I got her down to a growl - should I have taken her collar and led her away? If I had used a treat maybe she would have stopped but i was also trying to deal with my grandson who was looking for something -
 

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Keep a leash handy by the window then snap it to her collar when you're ready to lead her away. A frustrated dog who gets hauled away by his collar may try and bite even though they wouldn't normaly ever consider such a thing.

Yup, a treat would have been a good idea. Maybe keep something close at hand there too along with the leash for a little while.

If you're praising her make sure you're not making a big deal out of it for the barking part. We already know she knows how to bark at the window lol. A simple yes or good will do. Then follow that with enough or whatever word you are going to use to mean ok stop barking now. That is when the treats come out and loads of praise when she stops since stopping is the point of the training in this case. That is also when the leash comes out if you need to physcialy remove her from the window. It's really important that when you remove her though that you don't just pull her down out of the window. Go as far away as it takes for her to shift her attention to you. Then praise and treat. You may need a treat at first to lure her (along with the leash) away from the window. Remember you've praised and treated her for her quiet focus on YOU not on being quiet but intent to get back to the window. At that point once she's been treated/praised for comming down out of the window if she tries to go back is when you stop her. Get her attention back on you or if you can't she goes to time out. She's only allowed to bark at the window to warn you of doom once LoL.
 

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Keep a leash handy by the window then snap it to her collar when you're ready to lead her away. A frustrated dog who gets hauled away by his collar may try and bite even though they wouldn't normaly ever consider such a thing.

Yup, a treat would have been a good idea. Maybe keep something close at hand there too along with the leash for a little while.

If you're praising her make sure you're not making a big deal out of it for the barking part. We already know she knows how to bark at the window lol. A simple yes or good will do. Then follow that with enough or whatever word you are going to use to mean ok stop barking now. That is when the treats come out and loads of praise when she stops since stopping is the point of the training in this case. That is also when the leash comes out if you need to physcialy remove her from the window. It's really important that when you remove her though that you don't just pull her down out of the window. Go as far away as it takes for her to shift her attention to you. Then praise and treat. You may need a treat at first to lure her (along with the leash) away from the window. Remember you've praised and treated her for her quiet focus on YOU not on being quiet but intent to get back to the window. At that point once she's been treated/praised for comming down out of the window if she tries to go back is when you stop her. Get her attention back on you or if you can't she goes to time out. She's only allowed to bark at the window to warn you of doom once LoL.
Thanks so much for all your advice - I am printing what you are teaching me - lol cause I have short term memory moments or senior moments lol

I will keep the leash handy and treats - I have a feeling I am in for it when people start walkin by - hope I do good - must be patient while training yes?! lol Thanks again!
 

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LoL, Yes you must be patient and in most cases it gets worse before it gets better. I wish it was easier sometimes. LoL, People want a magic dog training problem solving one dose pill to fix what ails them. I'll let you know when I finish developing that (along with workable pig wings we're working on, LoL)
 
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