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Discussion Starter #1
So, just a few minutes ago, I was with Ted at the front door. He usually stands at the door post and most of the time won't move until he sees another animal or someone he knows. Something caught his attention, but I couldn't tell what it was. It was another person that lives across the street walking her three small dogs (I don't know why, but she slighty irks me. She gives off the slight air of "bitch"). Well, since I didn't see them in order to close the door, Ted ran out to the sidewalk a few houses down and into the street by a parked car.

Since on the corner of my block there is a traffic light that every driver literally speeds to catch, I was so scared that some retarded driver was gonna zoom past, so I kept yelling his name for him to come inside. Mind you, I was in a nightgown, so leaving the house wasn't an option. When he reached behind the parked car, he looked at me, while I kept constantly calling him, and he finally trotted back inside.

Of course, I went into "What the hell is wrong with you?!" mommy rant mode. I even gave him a few spanks to his behind, along with a finger-wagging.

Lord have mercy, I'm only 16 and this dog is literally making me reconsider having kids when I'm older. >.<

Want to teach your children about teenage parenthood? Get them a dog. The birth control/teaching aide that's available at any breeder, pet store, or animal shelter.
 

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Okay I'm sorry but I gotta agree with Locket. Your dog ran out at a potentially busy road, could have been seriously injured or killed, and you wouldn't go after him because.. you were in a nightgown?? O:

Also, I wouldn't pop him on the behind for coming back to you. That's what you want, right?? :) You want to praise him LOADS for coming back when called, even if he didn't do it on the first try. That's great that he did at all!! If you fuss at him every time he gets out and comes back, he's gonna stop coming back if it means he gets yelled at! lol but I definitely understand. I've wanted to yell at Desmond before because he's run out and didn't come when I called him, but you've gotta think that at least ultimately, he cares about YOU more than the interesting outside, and came back. :) That's definitely something that deserves a cookie, especially since it did save him from a dangerous situation.

And LOL I agree about doggy parenthood! I'm 17 and also do NOT plan on having human children. I just.. am not a kid person. Dogs, I can get along with, and they are still tough to raise!! :)
 

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I'm with Locket on this one - nothing would stop me if I was afraid for my dog's safety. Spankings and finger wagging don't teach a dog anything other than to be scared of you. Grab some good treats and call him in your most "we're going to do something really fun!" voice and start heading in the opposite direction you want him to go. Dogs have a natural instinct to chase and the majority will want to see what's up with mom and all the fun she's having.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If my dog was in danger of getting hit by a car, I don't care if I was naked, I would go get my dog!!
True, I feel a bit guilty for not chasing after him, but if I did chase after him, we would've been even more screwed. Calling out his name was the better solution, than having a chasing frenzy in the street, increasing our danger.
 

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Okay I'm sorry but I gotta agree with Locket. Your dog ran out at a potentially busy road, could have been seriously injured or killed, and you wouldn't go after him because.. you were in a nightgown?? O:

Also, I wouldn't pop him on the behind for coming back to you. That's what you want, right?? :) You want to praise him LOADS for coming back when called, even if he didn't do it on the first try. That's great that he did at all!! If you fuss at him every time he gets out and comes back, he's gonna stop coming back if it means he gets yelled at! lol but I definitely understand. I've wanted to yell at Desmond before because he's run out and didn't come when I called him, but you've gotta think that at least ultimately, he cares about YOU more than the interesting outside, and came back. :) That's definitely something that deserves a cookie, especially since it did save him from a dangerous situation.

And LOL I agree about doggy parenthood! I'm 17 and also do NOT plan on having human children. I just.. am not a kid person. Dogs, I can get along with, and they are still tough to raise!! :)
The road isn't busy, it's just the random a-holes that drive down like maniacs for the traffic light. Fools even tried to get me ran over.

I feel super guilty for not chasing after him, and I was actually gonna run to get a toy to bring him back inside, but I dare didn't leave my eyes off of him. Chasing him would've been a wrong choice with this dog.

And the automatic taps on his behind for running out/being bad: it's a West Indian thing: don't ask questions, assume, and reprimand. >.<
 

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And LOL I agree about doggy parenthood! I'm 17 and also do NOT plan on having human children. I just.. am not a kid person. Dogs, I can get along with, and they are still tough to raise!! :)
Since having Ted, now when I speak to small children, I feel like I'm talking to Ted. O___O
 

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And the automatic taps on his behind for running out/being bad: it's a West Indian thing: don't ask questions, assume, and reprimand. >.<
He's a dog. All he associates hitting/spanking with is coming to you. He doesn't know that he is being reprimanded (although I don't think hitting/spanking a dog is EVER a good reprimand regardless of your background) for what he did before he came to you. Since this is an automatic response for you, you need to train yourself to count to 10 before doing anything so you don't respond like this again.
I would also start doing recall work with him. Start in a non-distracting environment with him on a leash, praise and treat like crazy for him coming to you. Do this until his recall in that environment is rock solid. Then start moving in to more and more distracting environments so his recall will be rock solid in a situation like this (you will also be training yourself to respond positively to him coming to you in any situation).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Most definitely my patience with him is something I really need to work on with him. Since I'm the one who mostly has to "reprimand" him (and is forced to whenever he does something "bad"), I can see that he looks at me at times as the bad guy. Sucks, too, considering I'm usually with him all the time. =(

This is my first dog/pet ever, so with every moment I'm still learning the ropes, and the advice/posts I get/read here on Poodle Forum really help out.
 

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I know how it feels to get angry and that's your first instinct on what to do, but you just need to turn your back on the situation and take a couple deep breaths and tell yourself that's not the way to handle the situation. My pets have made me very angry before, especially my boxer mix, who will shred garbage and scatter cat crap across the house when we're not home.. but spanking her, even though I'm furious, won't fix the problem.
 

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I think you need to get yourself to a good training class, Rosary! Your dog comes back from an exciting venture because you asked him to, and then you scold him and hit him?! How can you expect him to ever want to come when you call again? As others have said, spend a while immersing yourself in books about how dogs think - The Culture Clash, by Jean Donaldson would be a good start - count to 10 before reacting, and find a reward based training class. You do not have the excuse of learning your dog raising practices in another era, and ignorance is never an adequate excuse! Sorry - not bad poodle, but badly informed owner!
 

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Dogs don't ever need to be reprimanded unless caught AS the action of something bad is being done, and even then it needs to be carefully done. It should never happen after the bad action has happened, and yes even a few seconds can be too late!

I wish I knew now when I was 16 with my first dog too, and in fact some of it I did know then, but I wasn't confident enough in myself to be able to take charge around the whole family and do things the right way for her, cos they were different to the normal way.... :/

Look up clicker training and positive training, there's a lot of stuff to read if you keep looking, and join some of the groups and so forth too, take it all with a pinch of salt sometimes, but as you go on in life you'll realise how much sense it all makes later... I just don't want you regret too much with Ted like I do with my first girl, so be strong and do it the right way, for Ted!

(and yes, I was ADAMANT I wasn't having any kids when I was 16 too; I had a dog but I also had 4 and 6 year old siblings, so I was QUITE conscious of the tantrums, mess, sleepless nights etc that come with kids! No way no how was I wanting kids! I'm married now and awfully clucky and want kids ASAP.... ahh how times change!! LOL)
 

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It happens, and I've been known to run down the alley in t-shirt and panties!:doh: Of course, running away back to the house, not chasing that dog, cuz chasing does not work.

Not good to swat/spank or yell at the dog when he came back. You'll just teach him NOT to come back when you call. I can understand your frustration, but, not a good idea. Work on recall, girl!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sorry - not bad poodle, but badly informed owner!
Not to sound snippy or rude (and I hope it doesn't come across as so), but "badly informed" for me means "still new to this". That's why I come on Poodle Forum to learn and read helpful comments.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I wish I knew now when I was 16 with my first dog too, and in fact some of it I did know then, but I wasn't confident enough in myself to be able to take charge around the whole family and do things the right way for her, cos they were different to the normal way.... :/
That's exactly what's going on in my home a lot when trying to do things with Ted. Because of my mother, father, and cousin's experience with dogs back in Haiti, when I suggest something for him, I get an earful because I'm doing "too much" for the dog. Especially with my cousin, he doesn't like to pick up Ted's poop, so he takes him to an area that has tons of poop to prevent picking it up. :doh: Just an example of a slightly lax attitude.
 

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yup, it's rough trying to be different when living with your family, so do your best, read up lots on positive training and WHY it works so well so you have more confidence in yourself in being able to stand up to your family a little more. You will have to 'give' on some things to placate your family somewhat too, but when your family has no say, stick up for Ted! (like when he ran out the door and it was you, and only you, who gave him a smack when he came back)

He's your dog, but you live under the rules of others. Give and take a bit, but try to do the best for Ted at every chance you can, without entirely alienating your family. Remember that, don't regret it later in life.
 

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I agree 100% with flyingduster!
You can also think of it this way... learning too stand up for your dog and also yourself by doing things that your family doesn't understand but is positive for you and Ted will teach and help you in the future to do what YOU feel is right for your Kid(s) instead of what your family wants you to do.
This coming from a gal who NEVER wanted kids until I got pregers but am soooo glad I've got one (he's been the greatest teacher I've ever had. One day I'll tell him that). And I chose to homeschool him. Talk about my parents and most everyone I knew giving me an earful of how I was doing the most terrible thing EVER and how I was going to DESTROY his life and turn him into some kind of monster. Sigh. I now love looking back on that, seeing how wrong they were and occasionally reminding them of that and watching them squirm.
Doing what's right for Ted will also teach you to be more confident in your own choices and decisions that may not be the family norm.
Just because my parents did it, and their parents did it, and their parents did it...etc doesn't always mean it was the right thing to do.
 
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