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Do you throw the baby out with the bathwater, or turn an eye to health problems? I know they are two extreams. If you found a problem in a dog in your lines (that you produced, not from a breeding dog) how much would you let it weigh on the dogs you continue to breed? Say for instance that its a disease that has never shown up in your lines before. Would you remove all dogs that are relative to this dog, or would to continue to breed those lines? What if its a littermate of a breeding dog you have (and continue to use and their offspring)?

I know they are hard decisions to make because of 1 dog. I am on both sides of the fence on this. For one, i dont know if a breeder should scrap a whole program on a dogs littermates health problems. On another, i wouldnt want to see the issue being ignored. Every line has problems, so there is bound for something sometime to show up. Should you stop everything when it does, or continue to breed and have a "wait and see" aproach?
 

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Wow, I'm also on both sides of the fence on that! I think so many factors go into the decision.

- What are the problems that have crept up?
- What do the breeding stock who are directly related to the dogs contribute to the breed as a whole, and how does that weigh up against the problems that have occurred?
- What are the chances of these problems coming up again in the future, and what is my plan (as a breeder) if they do?

If I were a breeder, I would certainly tread lightly once those problems had been identified. And if I began to see a pattern emerging I would definitely rethink my breeding program.
 

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Do you throw the baby out with the bathwater, or turn an eye to health problems? I know they are two extreams. If you found a problem in a dog in your lines (that you produced, not from a breeding dog) how much would you let it weigh on the dogs you continue to breed? Say for instance that its a disease that has never shown up in your lines before. Would you remove all dogs that are relative to this dog, or would to continue to breed those lines? What if its a littermate of a breeding dog you have (and continue to use and their offspring)?

I know they are hard decisions to make because of 1 dog. I am on both sides of the fence on this. For one, i dont know if a breeder should scrap a whole program on a dogs littermates health problems. On another, i wouldnt want to see the issue being ignored. Every line has problems, so there is bound for something sometime to show up. Should you stop everything when it does, or continue to breed and have a "wait and see" aproach?
Hmmm...

Is this about this gorgeous dog?? who has been bred, but has a littermate with Addisons.. and hyperlipidemia?

I too am on the fence with this...

I would most likely say.. yes spey and neuter all siblings.. and offspring.. not sure how far I would go as to do the parents as well...

But I am no breeder, so I don't know :D
 

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If I were a breeder, which I never will be, I would not even think twice. No dog with health issues in the line would be bred. If that would mean the demise of my breeding program, then so be it. But I would never ever want to be responsible for breeding a dog with health problems. I know it's pretty much impossible to only produce 100% healthy specimens, but that would be the standard I would hold myself too. I want to better the breed. Breeding dogs with health problems in the line, especially as close as a sibling is potentially very risky and I just would not take the chance.
 

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I think many things go into a decision.

Sometimes you can see a clear path with a disorder. I have a breeder friend who has seizures in one leg of her line. You can clearly track the seizures back to a certain stud dog because none of the other unrelated lines have seizures, but multiple dogs in the one line do. Even though this line was wonderful, she spayed and neutered everything from it.

For me and the issue of Bloat in my line, it came down to the fact that so many of Sabrina's siblings and 1/2 siblings had Bloated. There was a clear predisposition to the condition coming down from her sire (note sire never Bloated but sire's dam had).

With something like Addisons it gets a bit trickier. I would not want to breed to a dog who had produced Addisons and I would not breed to a dog who had a full sibling with Addisons. However, I would breed to a dog whose sibling had produced Addisons because you don't know what the extra set of genes has brought to the mix.
 

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I have experience with a health issue with my cats. Its an unknow disorder I would in 2 cats I have. When they are bred they cause birth defects and still borns.

I did not breed the cats together again I figured maybe what ever it was could be bred out . I bred a son of the queen who was a carrier to a daughter of the king who was a carrier. Kittens came out fine no deformed kittens of still births, but one kitten died when he was 4 months old his sister barely made it. Vet did not know what was the cause of it.

I did not neuter of elimate the producers I just never will breed them together again or their offspring.
 
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