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We recently lost our 4 year old apricot standard poodle after an illness. She had the nicest, pleasantest disposition without a mean bone. She loved being near us and her gift was that everyone in our large family thought they were her favorite! She was calm but enthusiastic without being hyper, not a digger or barker or chewer If I could blink and have her back with us I would in an instant but since that is not an option, we are starting to consider a new poodle.

She did have a few traits that since she was our first poodle, I do not know if they are poodle traits or just specific to her but would prefer not to have them in our new dog. Are they common?

1. She got car sick so long car rides were not an option. She would start drooling as soon as I started driving. As a result this was not the dog who could come with me to pick up the kids. She basically drove to the groomer, the vet and petco and no place else. Since someone was always home it was not a major problem. She did great on the ride home from the breeder which was long. My other current dog and my prior dog (other breeds) did not have this problem.

2. She did not fetch easily and never fetched balls. The best we could do was she would sometimes fetch her stuffed animals.

3. She could not catch. If she caught something such as a piece of cheese it was an accident!

4. While the gentlest dog inside the house or on a leash, if she was loose in the fenced yard she would come at you/charge you and would sometimes snap at you. Someone said this was a strong prey drive?

Since we had children in the house we were a little worried. She nipped at least two kids who visited who were in the backyard with her (no one was hurt). She thought it was a game and was not being mean. After a while we told our kids none of their friends could play in the yard with her and we never had any problems. However having a dog that your kids cannot take outside is a little weird. My husband would play a chasing game with her that he and she seemed to enjoy but I would like a dog that I could trust with my children's friends. I also in general never trusted her with small children. Our youngest was 9 and petite when we got the dog and our daughter had to establish dominance over the dog which she did with the help of puppy class we went to

5. Before she got sick, she would still have accidents in the house about once a month. She would usually sneak into our finished basement at night and have an accident there. I say sneak because we rarely used it and she would rarely go down there otherwise unless she was following someone down there.

6. She hated water and we live driving distance to open water

She was also a counter surfer and garbage raider but I know that was our fault and is common to every larger breed.

Despite what I said we were very happy with her and miss her terribly.

She was a pet but from a show breeder who was recommended by several other highly reputable and well known breeders (Chic and OFA tested). Prior to our dog becoming ill we had been talking about getting her a puppy and I had said that I might want to look at a hunting poodle because our dog did not fetch (we are not hunters). Now that I know how long the wait is with one of the hunting breeders, that is not an option.

Do most poodles have the traits I mentioned? What is the best way to get a retriever?

Do the different colors have different personalities? I read they do but I wonder. My children do not want another apricot because it is too soon
 

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We recently lost our 4 year old apricot standard poodle after an illness. She had the nicest, pleasantest disposition without a mean bone. She loved being near us and her gift was that everyone in our large family thought they were her favorite! She was calm but enthusiastic without being hyper, not a digger or barker or chewer If I could blink and have her back with us I would in an instant but since that is not an option, we are starting to consider a new poodle.

She did have a few traits that since she was our first poodle, I do not know if they are poodle traits or just specific to her but would prefer not to have them in our new dog. Are they common?

1. She got car sick so long car rides were not an option. She would start drooling as soon as I started driving. As a result this was not the dog who could come with me to pick up the kids. She basically drove to the groomer, the vet and petco and no place else. Since someone was always home it was not a major problem. She did great on the ride home from the breeder which was long. My other current dog and my prior dog (other breeds) did not have this problem. My poodles are fine in the car, no car sickness. If the only places your poodle ever went in the car weren't fun for her then I can understand why she was anxious in the car.

2. She did not fetch easily and never fetched balls. The best we could do was she would sometimes fetch her stuffed animals. Lily is a die hard for ball fetch, Javelin not so much but he just generally doesn't play with toys. He does retrieve his dumbbell though.

3. She could not catch. If she caught something such as a piece of cheese it was an accident! Neither of mine is good at catching food, but honestly why care about this?

4. While the gentlest dog inside the house or on a leash, if she was loose in the fenced yard she would come at you/charge you and would sometimes snap at you. Someone said this was a strong prey drive? She may have had strong prey drive, but without seeing video I really wouldn't speculate on that. This sounds more like a lack of training on impulse control to me though.

Since we had children in the house we were a little worried. She nipped at least two kids who visited who were in the backyard with her (no one was hurt). She thought it was a game and was not being mean. After a while we told our kids none of their friends could play in the yard with her and we never had any problems. However having a dog that your kids cannot take outside is a little weird. My husband would play a chasing game with her that he and she seemed to enjoy but I would like a dog that I could trust with my children's friends. I also in general never trusted her with small children. Our youngest was 9 and petite when we got the dog and our daughter had to establish dominance over the dog which she did with the help of puppy class we went to Dominance is BS. Training the dog to respect all of its relationships is meaningful. Taking children to puppy classes is essential to the establishment of that respect IMO.

5. Before she got sick, she would still have accidents in the house about once a month. She would usually sneak into our finished basement at night and have an accident there. I say sneak because we rarely used it and she would rarely go down there otherwise unless she was following someone down there. Those weren't accidents. They were a failure in training. My girl does not love going out to pee or poo in the rain. When she was under a year old she used to go out, disappear and return without going and then deliberately go to the basement to relieve herself. I fixed that by going out in the rain with her on a leash and not going back in the house until she was empty. She figured out quickly enough that if she didn't want to get soaked she should just do her business ASAP. She would never dream of relieving herself anywhere in the house unless we weren't home and she was sick.

6. She hated water and we live driving distance to open water Why do you care about this? Our dogs love to swim, but honestly if they didn't I wouldn't care.

She was also a counter surfer and garbage raider but I know that was our fault and is common to every larger breed. Yup, your fault, but nope not common to every larger breed. Our GSD has never thought about counter surfing. Lily is a terrible counter surfer and Javelin thought about it when he was an older puppy until I beaned him in the head with an empty soda bottle with pennies in it (from a distance, so he was very surprised).

Despite what I said we were very happy with her and miss her terribly.

She was a pet but from a show breeder who was recommended by several other highly reputable and well known breeders (Chic and OFA tested). Prior to our dog becoming ill we had been talking about getting her a puppy (never get a puppy for a dog, be clear we get puppies because we want them, not because our dogs need them as pals.) and I had said that I might want to look at a hunting poodle (dogs from working lines will likely be a huge handful, you don't need one if you are just wanting a nice family companion) because our dog did not fetch (we are not hunters). Now that I know how long the wait is with one of the hunting breeders, that is not an option.

Do most poodles have the traits I mentioned? What is the best way to get a retriever?

Do the different colors have different personalities? I read they do but I wonder. My children do not want another apricot because it is too soon

I still don't think I have a clue in the world about why you think you need a "retriever" if you really don't do any dog sports that require retrieving. My ball obsessed girl is not allowed any balls in the house. If she had access she would never sleep and be bringing balls for people to throw for her at all hours.


You need to go to a reliable breeder who does thoughtful matings to produce nice healthy and mellow pups. And don't obsess about color and personality. I don't think anyone can really say a particular color has a guaranteed personality type. Both of my spoos are black and they are very different dogs.
 

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I do not think color has anything to do with personality of a poodle, I have had blacks, whites, and reds. I do not think that is standard traits in any size poodle. Only one of mine plays will toys and she is 14, but I think it is because she takes them away from the other 2. I have toys and I do not allow children around them, as they do not seem to be comfortable with small kids. Some of the traits could be corrected with training in any poodle such as counter surfing and trash.
 

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We recently lost our 4 year old apricot standard poodle after an illness. She had the nicest, pleasantest disposition without a mean bone. She loved being near us and her gift was that everyone in our large family thought they were her favorite! She was calm but enthusiastic without being hyper, not a digger or barker or chewer If I could blink and have her back with us I would in an instant but since that is not an option, we are starting to consider a new poodle.

First of all, I'm so sorry for your loss :'( I can feel your pain.

She did have a few traits that since she was our first poodle, I do not know if they are poodle traits or just specific to her but would prefer not to have them in our new dog. Are they common?

1. She got car sick so long car rides were not an option. She would start drooling as soon as I started driving. As a result this was not the dog who could come with me to pick up the kids. She basically drove to the groomer, the vet and petco and no place else. Since someone was always home it was not a major problem. She did great on the ride home from the breeder which was long. My other current dog and my prior dog (other breeds) did not have this problem.

Both of my dogs got carsick as puppies, but with training, maturity, and lots of happy outings, they overcame it and can handle going on long trips or over the hill to the beach, which is a winding road. It is kind of luck of the draw on carsickness--half of Frosty's litter got sick as puppies and the other half were fine. He got the sickest, but I worked really hard with him to overcome it.

2. She did not fetch easily and never fetched balls. The best we could do was she would sometimes fetch her stuffed animals.

Look for a dog that scores 3 on the Volhard if you want one that fetches. Both of my dogs are fabulous retrievers. It is nonsense that you need a dog from hunting lines if you want a retriever. Mine are both from conformation lines (Frosty has some obedience in his lines as well).

3. She could not catch. If she caught something such as a piece of cheese it was an accident!

Mine can't catch food, but they can catch a ball or stuffed toy.


4. While the gentlest dog inside the house or on a leash, if she was loose in the fenced yard she would come at you/charge you and would sometimes snap at you. Someone said this was a strong prey drive?

Since we had children in the house we were a little worried. She nipped at least two kids who visited who were in the backyard with her (no one was hurt). She thought it was a game and was not being mean. After a while we told our kids none of their friends could play in the yard with her and we never had any problems. However having a dog that your kids cannot take outside is a little weird. My husband would play a chasing game with her that he and she seemed to enjoy but I would like a dog that I could trust with my children's friends. I also in general never trusted her with small children. Our youngest was 9 and petite when we got the dog and our daughter had to establish dominance over the dog which she did with the help of puppy class we went to

Take lily cd re's advice on this one!

5. Before she got sick, she would still have accidents in the house about once a month. She would usually sneak into our finished basement at night and have an accident there. I say sneak because we rarely used it and she would rarely go down there otherwise unless she was following someone down there.

Ditto, lily's advice.

6. She hated water and we live driving distance to open water

If you want a dog who will get in the water, look for a breeder who exposes them to water early. Mine love to splash around about waist high, but they don't go deep enough to swim.

She was also a counter surfer and garbage raider but I know that was our fault and is common to every larger breed.

Both of my spoos are counter surfers and garbage raiders if given the opportunity (so they are NOT given the opportunity).

Despite what I said we were very happy with her and miss her terribly.

She was a pet but from a show breeder who was recommended by several other highly reputable and well known breeders (Chic and OFA tested). Prior to our dog becoming ill we had been talking about getting her a puppy and I had said that I might want to look at a hunting poodle because our dog did not fetch (we are not hunters). Now that I know how long the wait is with one of the hunting breeders, that is not an option.

Do most poodles have the traits I mentioned? What is the best way to get a retriever?

Tell your breeder this trait is important to you. I would imagine there are some natural retrievers in every spoo litter. You may have to do some training, as I did in the beginning with mine, but not much.

Do the different colors have different personalities? I read they do but I wonder. My children do not want another apricot because it is too soon
My silver and cream have fabulous personalities :) But, temperament is much more an issue of quality breeding than color.
 

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I think everyone has given good advice already.
My poodle got extremely carsick for 6 months. Everywhere we went was fun - he loved the groomers and the vet, so that wasn’t the issue! I didn’t give up or stop car rides. I tried a whole bunch of training to make the car a fun place (he was reluctant to get in) and he got great treats for going in, And getting out (even if we didn’t go anywhere). My point is he got over it and it could have been my efforts or just time:)
The only place my guy counter surfs is visiting relatives who are not careful... definitely he’s an opportunist so I “blame” the humans. He never thought of it until he got rewarded just once...
He doesn’t retrieve well.
He doesn’t swim but loves water.
I have tried some training for both of those and can see a difference but I haven’t pursued it because it just didn’t seem important ultimately:) He has other great qualities, such as paddle boarding — he’s not interested in swimming so happily sits there for up to an hour!
He isn’t ball obsessed so I never have an issue with him taking other dogs’ balls or him bugging people to throw it constantly, etc. He’s more interested in what everyone is doing and plays other great games! — we are a therapy dog team and visit long-term care facility, walk in parades etc.
That’s what I asked for in temperament - not specifically about retrieving or swimming of course because I didn’t really think of it - but one who was confident around people and very social.
So I would ask the breeder.
Definitely not poodle traits as the other poodles I have met are completely different...
 

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1. She got car sick so long car rides were not an option. She would start drooling as soon as I started driving. As a result this was not the dog who could come with me to pick up the kids. She basically drove to the groomer, the vet and petco and no place else. Since someone was always home it was not a major problem. She did great on the ride home from the breeder which was long. My other current dog and my prior dog (other breeds) did not have this problem.
No, my standard poodle (or any of my dogs) was never car sick.

2. She did not fetch easily and never fetched balls. The best we could do was she would sometimes fetch her stuffed animals.
My boy LOVES fetch, he will fetch pretty much anything but definitely loves his balls.

3. She could not catch. If she caught something such as a piece of cheese it was an accident!
My boy has decent catching ability. He is in full coat with some loose stuff that hangs over his eyes sometimes so he sometimes can't see little things coming as easily but once he gets cut down I think that should get a lot better too. Toys and stuff he can catch pretty well
4. While the gentlest dog inside the house or on a leash, if she was loose in the fenced yard she would come at you/charge you and would sometimes snap at you. Someone said this was a strong prey drive?
My boy will sometimes play by mouthing but he's never snapped at me aggressively, I don't have kids so that wasn't ever a worry for me.
Since we had children in the house we were a little worried. She nipped at least two kids who visited who were in the backyard with her (no one was hurt). She thought it was a game and was not being mean. After a while we told our kids none of their friends could play in the yard with her and we never had any problems. However having a dog that your kids cannot take outside is a little weird. My husband would play a chasing game with her that he and she seemed to enjoy but I would like a dog that I could trust with my children's friends. I also in general never trusted her with small children. Our youngest was 9 and petite when we got the dog and our daughter had to establish dominance over the dog which she did with the help of puppy class we went to

5. Before she got sick, she would still have accidents in the house about once a month. She would usually sneak into our finished basement at night and have an accident there. I say sneak because we rarely used it and she would rarely go down there otherwise unless she was following someone down there.
My boy right now is going through a spurt of going into my grooming kennel room getting excited to see the other dogs and dribbling a bit, but he doesn't have squat/lift leg full pees and never poops in the house
6. She hated water and we live driving distance to open water
My boy hasn't had a ton of exposure to water but he likes it.
She was also a counter surfer and garbage raider but I know that was our fault and is common to every larger breed.
My boy has never counter surfed or garbage raided other than tissues. In fact even stuff on the coffee table is safe and if I leave him in the car with food within reach he won't eat it.
 

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I'm sorry for you loss, 4 years is far to young to lose a puppy. How sad for your whole family.

She did have a few traits that since she was our first poodle, I do not know if they are poodle traits or just specific to her but would prefer not to have them in our new dog. Are they common?

1. She got car sick so long car rides were not an option. She would start drooling as soon as I started driving. As a result this was not the dog who could come with me to pick up the kids. She basically drove to the groomer, the vet and petco and no place else. Since someone was always home it was not a major problem. She did great on the ride home from the breeder which was long. My other current dog and my prior dog (other breeds) did not have this problem. My current minipoo had motion sickness - she would even throw bile and froth if her stomach was empty. She was also fearful of the car. I spent time desensitizing her to the car. I bought her a sleepypod harness which makes her feel secure in the car as she is belted into the car seat in such a way that she is part of the seat although she can sit up and move around. And we go to fun places, the park, dog training clubs, which means tons of treats. My dog hasn't thrown up since I got the sleepypod harness. She jumps into the car, gets her harness on and lays down so I can buckle her into the car seat belt.We can drive 5 hours to visit my daughters without any problems, just a few potty breaks to stretch our legs. Many puppies have car sickness as a puppy and outgrow it as adults. There are also medications, over the counter and prescription that can help.

2. She did not fetch easily and never fetched balls. The best we could do was she would sometimes fetch her stuffed animals.My dog loves to chase a toy that's thrown, but she wants us to chase her with it, she doesn't return it. I'm thrilled that I've been able to train her to return her plastic dumbbell for obedience. My dog does love to play tug with some of her toys.

3. She could not catch. If she caught something such as a piece of cheese it was an accident!My dog doesn't catch food in her mouth that has been tossed into the air. Many dogs don't. However if you want a dog that can do tricks to entertain visitors, my dog has earned all her trick dog titles up to Master Dog Level - it's not hard to train a poodle to do fun tricks. It's something your kids can do and then show off to their friends. When my kids were little, they taught our toy poodle to climb on a ball and walk on it, she also learned to go up a baby slide and go down the slide herself.

4. While the gentlest dog inside the house or on a leash, if she was loose in the fenced yard she would come at you/charge you and would sometimes snap at you. Someone said this was a strong prey drive?I'm not knowledgeable but I don't think that is prey drive. Rather I think that's part of socialization or was she fearful of being harmed? Did something happen to her when she was a puppy in the yard that made her wary? None of my poodles ever did this - my dog growing up, the one we had when our kids were young nor my current poodle.

Since we had children in the house we were a little worried. She nipped at least two kids who visited who were in the backyard with her (no one was hurt). She thought it was a game and was not being mean. After a while we told our kids none of their friends could play in the yard with her and we never had any problems. However having a dog that your kids cannot take outside is a little weird. My husband would play a chasing game with her that he and she seemed to enjoy but I would like a dog that I could trust with my children's friends. I also in general never trusted her with small children. Our youngest was 9 and petite when we got the dog and our daughter had to establish dominance over the dog which she did with the help of puppy class we went toI agree with Lily, teaching dominance over a dog is wrong and can set up a host of problems. How was your dog's bite inhibition developed when going through the land shark phase of puppyhood? Perhaps she never fully learned to not nip as a puppy? Was she nipping when she was excited and exuberant?

5. Before she got sick, she would still have accidents in the house about once a month. She would usually sneak into our finished basement at night and have an accident there. I say sneak because we rarely used it and she would rarely go down there otherwise unless she was following someone down there.Unless she was sick earlier and perhaps peeing in the house was due to illness, it was due to incomplete toilet training. Dogs need to be taught that each area of their house and other inside spaces are not for potty. Most people assume that since they are toilet trained for the kitchen and the family room that they are then safe to roam the rest of the house, however they need to learn it in each part of the house, especially in areas the family don't visit often - they need to learn the boundaries of what is house and what is outside for potty. What to us makes perfect sense, to the dog doesn't mean anything. They need to learn not to potty in your complete house and then taken into other buildings and taught not to potty. I take my dog weekly to a small dog social were many of the dogs mark inside with pee and poop. Some of the male dogs also mark inside their own homes. My dog never does - half way through she comes to me to get her leash on so we can go outside where she will pee mark and then back inside to play. I contrast this with all the dog clubs I take my dog for training and competition - I never see those dogs peeing or pooping inside and that's because the owners know that if their dog goes potty inside during a competition that they are disqualified and have to leave. These owners understand they have to train their dogs not to go inside any building not just their kitchen and family room at home. I know when you get your new puppy you'll refresh yourself on how to train it and you won't make that same mistake.

6. She hated water and we live driving distance to open water My dog loves the water, but she has very thick fur that I sometimes grow long - and it's a mess to clean her up when her fur is long and I have to blow it dry. Of course if you keep the fur short and let it air dry it's not a problem.

She was also a counter surfer and garbage raider but I know that was our fault and is common to every larger breed. Mine is a minipoo, not tall enough to countersurf but she definitely could reach into garbage cans. She doesn't because I never keep anything of interest in them for her to sort through. If I had a spoo, I would make a special effort to not allow countersurfing. Similar to what Lily did with her Javelin, you can keep noisy objects on the counter that if the knock them they fall and scare the dog away from the counter. Also keep the counter clear of any food so there aren't any temptations.

Despite what I said we were very happy with her and miss her terribly.

She was a pet but from a show breeder who was recommended by several other highly reputable and well known breeders (Chic and OFA tested). Prior to our dog becoming ill we had been talking about getting her a puppy and I had said that I might want to look at a hunting poodle because our dog did not fetch (we are not hunters). Now that I know how long the wait is with one of the hunting breeders, that is not an option.I would avoid a hunting poodle - they have very strong prey drives and need a lot of training and work - if you don't all that energy will end up looking for mischief.

Do most poodles have the traits I mentioned? What is the best way to get a retriever?I'm not sure you need a retriever, what I think you need is a family dog that is good with children. Consider what behaviors are important to you and speak to the breeder about them.

Do the different colors have different personalities? I read they do but I wonder. My children do not want another apricot because it is too soon
I agree, I think you would be wise to look for another color, there are lots of choices.

While no dog is perfect, I hope you find one that is a great fit with your family.
 

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A wonderful breeder I knew online used to recommend ginger snap cookies for dogs with car sickness. Of course, you'd want the cookies made with real ginger in them for this :).
 

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Thank you for the responses. Given that I get a do over of sorts (not one that I wanted) I would like some aspects to be different but I am sure the next dog will have her own quirks. Most of these behaviors bothered me when she was younger but she was such a great dog otherwise by the time she was a year old that we lived with them and did not let them bother us.

Of course the puppy would have been for us. Part of the reason we wanted a new puppy, up until our adult poodle got sick, is we had been so happy with her and thought we would have more fun with two. We were only hesitating because we did not think our foster dog would love it and neither would our friends who dog sit when we go on vacation.

I still don't think I have a clue in the world about why you think you need a "retriever" if you really don't do any dog sports that require retrieving.

Much as we all loved her, I listened to 4 years of my kids complaining that their dog did not know how to play outside! We tried all sorts of things to get her to stop charging at us. We have a foster dog that is still with us and she used to do this to him. He would growl and she sometimes got the message, sometimes not. While I totally believe that the counter surfing, and peeing in the house was on me, I think this was a behavior that probably required a professional and was something with her. If she had been a retriever that would have been something my kids could have played with her. They did teach her tricks (not to show off, we are not that kind of family, just for fun) which she did in the house and on leash and we would play fetch in the house with her stuffed animals but outside off leash, she became the attack dog. Again, she never did anything more than nip or mouth (I know if she wanted to she could have bitten hard) but it is still a little scary to see 50 lbs of dog come hurtling at you. She wanted to be outside when my kids and their friends were in the yard but it was not safe. Since my kids are older and wander with their friends, this was not that often. As recently as a year ago she nipped my son's friend from behind while the kids were playing catch. She knew him well, he is a very respectful child who has his own. In my life I have spent time with or owned 6 other dogs, none ever exhibited this type of behavior or were I did not trust them with small children. In fact, the foster dog we have now who is a terrier mix does not like new adults but he is great with children. My dog growing up used to go with us to sleep away camp visiting day where 200 kids would pet him after a three hour car ride and he was always gentle (try to take a pillow away from him though, good luck, so I know most have their quirks, we assumed this was hers). As an adult she never bit or mouthed anyone when she was inside the house, in the house she was calm and trustworthy.

She was never scared or had anything traumatic happen, even when she got sick she was very calm about it did not mind going to the vet, was never hurt in any way, came from an extremely reputable breeder at 8 weeks, with CHIC numbers for her parents, grandparents and so on. The breeder met me and our children, we talked about our needs.

As fpr the dominance, that term came from the training class, my daughter was instructed to make herself bigger through her posture and to be very firm and direct in giving instructions to the dog. Call it what you will. This was extremely helpful and my daughter and the dog had no more problems

She liked the car, loved going to Petco and meeting the other dogs. She would start drooling which she never did at any other time. It was a physical reaction. The irony is that I get car sick but none of my kids do, only the dog did.

The water aspect I was curious about, same with the catching. The water is not that important although we do live near open water and spend time there. I figured a breed called a puddle hound would like water, she did not. I have never before had a dog that so completely could not catch. My two prior dogs could catch almost anything (different breeds), not sure about the two before that, I do not remember but I do not remember them not being able to catch and wonder if this is a poodle trait
 

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My condolences on the loss f your girl. Good advice has been given. Just find a good breeder and mention these things that are important to you. Most good breeders will do the volhard aptitude test at 7 weeks to help place puppies in the right homes. I have administered this test to several litters for breeder friends. One of the tests is retrieving. We always use a crumpled up paper. Ask the breeder about the scores on that specific part of the test, but also pay attention to the other scores. In my opinion 3s and 4s make the best family pets.

Poodles are a mouthy breed, no doubt about that, and most dogs find children running around to be extremely stimulating and exciting. I worked a lot with my puppy to keep her from chasing my son when she was a baby (my son has disabilities and is very small). She still occasionally gets excited around him but I think only once or twice in the past year has she accidentally knocked him over or stepped on his foot.

Teach your children not to overstimulate the puppy, and you will be off to a good start. Chasing games with children should be avoided (in my opinion). If the puppy starts to chase a child, immediately have the child stop running and ignore anything the puppy is doing or give the puppy a small time out. There are loads of training threads on here about specific issues and since a lot of your girls problems were caused by training, you can easily change that by starting off on the right foot with a new pup. Puppies have sponge brains, and anything you let them do as a baby they will remember and continue as an adult.
 

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I still think your previous dog's (RIP) behavior outside was a training issue and not a temperament problem. I get that your kids may have liked to play fetch in the yard with her, but it sounds like they had lots of fun things that they did with her teaching her tricks.


I do not think you want a dog from hunting lines, just a nice middle of the road personality puppy from a well planned litter with health tested parents. Train properly in puppyhood and probably almost any poodle with play some sort of fetch and enjoy splashing on a shore line even if (s)he doesn't want to swim.
 
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I do not think you want a dog from hunting lines, just a nice middle of the road personality puppy from a well planned litter with health tested parents. Train properly in puppyhood and probably almost any poodle with play some sort of fetch and enjoy splashing on a shore line even if (s)he doesn't want to swim.
I agree. No need for a high drive poodle for an average house hold that just wants to play some fetch with their dog. The higher the drive the more you have to work that dog's brain to keep them satisfied. Something a family with young children often don't have the time or desire to do. They just want a fun family companion.
 

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We recently lost our 4 year old apricot standard poodle after an illness. She had the nicest, pleasantest disposition without a mean bone. She loved being near us and her gift was that everyone in our large family thought they were her favorite! She was calm but enthusiastic without being hyper, not a digger or barker or chewer If I could blink and have her back with us I would in an instant but since that is not an option, we are starting to consider a new poodle.

She did have a few traits that since she was our first poodle, I do not know if they are poodle traits or just specific to her but would prefer not to have them in our new dog. Are they common?


Sorry for the loss of your young dog. That's very unfortunate.


1. She got car sick so long car rides were not an option. She would start drooling as soon as I started driving. As a result this was not the dog who could come with me to pick up the kids. She basically drove to the groomer, the vet and petco and no place else. Since someone was always home it was not a major problem. She did great on the ride home from the breeder which was long. My other current dog and my prior dog (other breeds) did not have this problem.


My poodle does not get car sick. That was a relief, since we travel with him a ton. My sister's mini golden doodle does struggle with car sickness, still, at over three years old. They have tried many things, and seen some improvement, but it's still a bit of a gamble on long trips.


2. She did not fetch easily and never fetched balls. The best we could do was she would sometimes fetch her stuffed animals.

My poodle sometimes enjoys a little bit of fetch. Mostly short distance, and not too many repetitions.

3. She could not catch. If she caught something such as a piece of cheese it was an accident!

My poodle can catch tossed treats, but he is not good at it. My mini mutt is great at it, so the poodle loses out on a few missed treats.

4. While the gentlest dog inside the house or on a leash, if she was loose in the fenced yard she would come at you/charge you and would sometimes snap at you. Someone said this was a strong prey drive?

Since we had children in the house we were a little worried. She nipped at least two kids who visited who were in the backyard with her (no one was hurt). She thought it was a game and was not being mean. After a while we told our kids none of their friends could play in the yard with her and we never had any problems. However having a dog that your kids cannot take outside is a little weird. My husband would play a chasing game with her that he and she seemed to enjoy but I would like a dog that I could trust with my children's friends. I also in general never trusted her with small children. Our youngest was 9 and petite when we got the dog and our daughter had to establish dominance over the dog which she did with the help of puppy class we went to.

My poodle is gentle with people. Sometimes he is hesitant when meeting new men in a different setting. He does nip at my mini mutt. He does fine with most dogs, in most scenarios. He can be scared of energetic dogs he has not met before.

5. Before she got sick, she would still have accidents in the house about once a month. She would usually sneak into our finished basement at night and have an accident there. I say sneak because we rarely used it and she would rarely go down there otherwise unless she was following someone down there.

My poodle is awesome at going outside. It took a while to get past the puppy accidents, but at 5+ months he was doing great.

6. She hated water and we live driving distance to open water

She was also a counter surfer and garbage raider but I know that was our fault and is common to every larger breed.

Despite what I said we were very happy with her and miss her terribly.

My poodle is fine with water. He likes it, but does does not love or hate it. He will swim sometimes.

My poodle is a shameless counter surfer. He is good when we are around, but if we are not around, he goes surfing. When we catch him, we do communicate that he did a bad thing, but he shows no regret.


She was a pet but from a show breeder who was recommended by several other highly reputable and well known breeders (Chic and OFA tested). Prior to our dog becoming ill we had been talking about getting her a puppy and I had said that I might want to look at a hunting poodle because our dog did not fetch (we are not hunters). Now that I know how long the wait is with one of the hunting breeders, that is not an option.

Do most poodles have the traits I mentioned? What is the best way to get a retriever?

You would think that mixing a poodle with a retriever would get you what you want. But, "doodles" are really hit or miss in every area - coat, personality, etc. So, your best bet is relying on a good poodle breeder, and the temperment testing they do around 7-8 weeks of age.

Do the different colors have different personalities? I read they do but I wonder. My children do not want another apricot because it is too soon

I don't think there is a very strong tie between colour and personality. I could be wrong, but for every trend you could identify, I'm sure there are lots of exceptional cases to argue against it with.
You've got lots of feedback already, but I've added my responses in bold above.
 

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I agree. No need for a high drive poodle for an average house hold that just wants to play some fetch with their dog. The higher the drive the more you have to work that dog's brain to keep them satisfied. Something a family with young children often don't have the time or desire to do. They just want a fun family companion.

Both of mine are higher drive dogs and for most people they would be a handful. But both of my poodles get brain work every day. Families just need easy keepers!
 

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I think making sure they have lots of positive experiences with water early on is a big factor in whether dogs will enjoy it later or not. Did you ever take your previous dog to the water when she was a puppy?

It took me about a year to teach Archie to reliably fetch (he started off just chasing the ball, then playing keep-away), but now he's obsessed with it.

If you had a hard time with her charging and mouthing in the yard, then you definitely don't want a high-drive dog. You want a nice mellow, middle-of-the-road temperament.
 

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I think making sure they have lots of positive experiences with water early on is a big factor in whether dogs will enjoy it later or not. Did you ever take your previous dog to the water when she was a puppy?



It took me about a year to teach Archie to reliably fetch (he started off just chasing the ball, then playing keep-away), but now he's obsessed with it.



If you had a hard time with her charging and mouthing in the yard, then you definitely don't want a high-drive dog. You want a nice mellow, middle-of-the-road temperament.


Speaking of learning fetch, I’ve found dogs can learn that game from watching other dogs do it.


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