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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I have never had to clip/trim my poodle (my perfect little baby angel) , but due to the Coronavirus our salon has been closed since April 6th. She always went for a full spa day treatment, Scissor cut, enzyme bath, foot pack, silk foam pack, the works every three weeks so I left everything to the professionals as far as that goes. Until now, I felt happy knowing that she got all the best care that she deserved. Now, with that option unavailable, I have been doing the basics myself. I bought a table-top hands free Duz hands free premium convertor motor dryer (it has an almost silent motor) at a dog event/fair/JKC show for drying when she got wet in sudden rain showers. It has multiple temp settings and wind speeds, but seems to take forever to dry.
Here's my question. Has anyone splurged for a free standing HV professional dryer for the occasional grooming session? Is it faster and better for her coat? (She has, according to the salon, a very thick coat of pure, soft, white hair) (She is also a very small toy poodle, not a standard)
Is there a difference between the free-standing and the more economical canister type?
Is there one brand that is better than another?
I would appreciate any insight.
Thank you.
 

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I checked out the Duz dryer and watched a video of it being used. I have never used one myself. It seems like it's meant to be used for slow fluff drying where you're brushing the fur while gently drying it. It isn't a particularly powerful dryer, which is probably why it takes a long time to dry. A high velocity dryer will definitely dry much more quickly. I use a flying pig HV dryer which is the canister type and it is quite capable of fluff drying my miniature poodle.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you so much for the response. Do you know if there is a difference in the affect on the coat when using a canister vs. a stand type? I was told (when she was just a puppy, so around 4 years ago) that the wrong dryer can damage a poodles coat, so I have always taken her to the salon. As she is my first poodle, I have always been very nervous about all things concerning her. I don't know if all the rumors are true, but I have lived by them so long now, I am worried about changing and causing some avoidable trouble.My poodles older sister ( miniature dachshund) seems to dry quickly with no evidence of coat damage even a human dryer.
 

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I'm not a groomer, and I just home groom my dog, so hopefully somebody with more experience can chime in. Possibly what was meant is that a dryer that is too hot can damage the hair. Even a dryer that has a "no heat" setting will still cause the air to heat up from the motor. My dryer does this, but it does not get hot enough to damage the hair. But I believe some do. A human hair dryer probably could get too hot, though I have used one on a low heat setting in the past and think that's fine.

I have never used a stand dryer or a professional HV dryer. But I would doubt very much that it would be worth it with a toy poodle. The dog is so small that you cannot use too much air power or you will blow her off the table :)

Another popular dryer for small poodles is the Chris Christensen Kool Pup. I think a couple members here have one.

Also, I hope you share more pictures! Your dogs are both very cute.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for the help. All of the shops here, in Tokyo and surrounding area, are still closed so I have no way to get any info. This site is really helpful.
 

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I use a B-air dryer similar to this one. It is pricey, but dries them quickly and fluffs the coat beautifully.i wouldn’t be without it. It takes a while to get used to the HV dryers, they are very powerful. Be careful not point it at her face, inside her ears, or any other orifices at high speed. I switch to the lower speeds to do anything near their face.

I’m not a pro but do groom all four of my dogs at home, and I’ve developed the skills, it does take a bit of practice though!

We are in phase one opening in my area. Hopefully Tokyo will e able to open soon as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you Raindrops. I found some retailers in Japan online, but they are all out of stock. They estimate the end of June to the beginning of July for shipping and another 2-3 weeks for delivery. (Must be send from the USA, but a triple the US$ price!)
 

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Thank you Raindrops. I found some retailers in Japan online, but they are all out of stock. They estimate the end of June to the beginning of July for shipping and another 2-3 weeks for delivery. (Must be send from the USA, but a triple the US$ price!)
Yes, I feared that might be the case if it's not carried locally. But there may be a similar product that you can get in Japan. I think Shernbao makes similar dryers and is based in China. Another brand that is popular is K-9 Dryers and Shelandy. You may be able to contact a local groomer and see if they can recommend a good one that won't have to be shipped so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you for your help. Looking online (Mostly amazon Japan) it looks like no matter what, I will have to wait a while before they become available. I think I will heed your advice, and check with some local salons after they are up and running again, to find out what options there are in Japan as after-service could be thing of importance going down the road.
I finally was able to get a WAHL Bravura clipper Sunday. After the thread on clippers a while back, I tried to find one, but all were sold out or triple the regular price. (I don't want to put a price on the care of my angels, but I really don't want to support that kind of business practice)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wow! I hope to be able to trip that well some day. Until now, the salon has always done scissor cuts, so I am a little nervous. I tried to order the metal clip combs that everyone talked about, but again, everywhere is out of stock. I am now thinking about the next lockdown (hopefully it will never happen) but I owe it to them to be prepared fo a full-on home-grooming session if need be. I regret not trying things a little sooner. I was just too scared. As someone wrote, it is hair and it will grow back. I just don't want to hurt them or their health in anyway.
 

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They are adorable, and that is a very nice groom! I haven’t tried that style of grooming but there are a lot of tutorials. I also use the Wall cordless with metal clips. I do some scissoring around the face. Here is Gracie.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sooo cute! I really like her curly top, shaved face and ear look. Over here, and I don't know why, but they don't usually seem to share or close cut around the faces. When Isabelle was just a young pup, I had asked about a shaved face, but they looked and me a little funny and said it wouldn't look very nice. Looking back, I'm not sure if it was due to her face shape, or since I don't see other poodles with shaved faces, it is just something they don't like doing...???
Does Gracie mind shaving around her face? Isabelle didn't seem to like it when I tried to use scissors (before my Wahl Bravura arrived. I think it was just that she felt my fear. I have always had dogs, but never a poodle. Mostly shorter haired dogs; beagles, golden retrievers, and miniature long haired dachshunds, but still their fur is not that long.
 

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Sooo cute! I really like her curly top, shaved face and ear look. Over here, and I don't know why, but they don't usually seem to share or close cut around the faces. When Isabelle was just a young pup, I had asked about a shaved face, but they looked and me a little funny and said it wouldn't look very nice. Looking back, I'm not sure if it was due to her face shape, or since I don't see other poodles with shaved faces, it is just something they don't like doing...???
Does Gracie mind shaving around her face? Isabelle didn't seem to like it when I tried to use scissors (before my Wahl Bravura arrived. I think it was just that she felt my fear. I have always had dogs, but never a poodle. Mostly shorter haired dogs; beagles, golden retrievers, and miniature long haired dachshunds, but still their fur is not that long.
I think it is probably just differing styles. Japanese styles usually leave a fluffy face so they are probably not used to shaving them. I think she would look good either way. She looks like she has a pretty face. If you do ever want to try it, she will take a while to get used to the feeling of a trimmer on her face. It takes some desensitization for them to not be afraid of the vibration.
 

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I’ve never used a stand dryer so I can’t really attest to that! But I wanted to say that your dogs are so cute.
I’m always amazed and delighted by the skillful, scissor-only Asian fusion styles I see from that side of the world. I think due to the time constraints and cost, it’s pretty hard to find a groomer who’d do a style like that in the US for most people. I’d estimate that a toy poodle getting the works like yours in the US would cost about 100 dollars (possibly more), or 10,755 Japanese yen when I do a conversion. Plus most groomers just don’t have that skill since they never do it.

The fact that you bring your poodle in every 3 weeks and pamper her like that is so sweet!
 

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Thank you for the compliment. It takes about three and a half hours for the pros to do it. Is it about the same amount of time for grooming in your area?
I searched a long time to find the salon they go to for multiple factors, and think it is worth the price which ends up being about double your estimate:cry:. (The history behind it is: When Isabelle, my poodle, first came home and was too young to go to the salon (they won't accept dogs before rabies vaccinations, so 6months age here) I didn't pluck her ear hair enough, and she got a slight irritation from the build up of humidity as she has thick ears as well as thick coat around them. The vet plucked her ears and gave an ointment and it cleared up in 4-5days. It has traumatized me and I have always been scared that I might not be giving the maximum care that she deserves.)
However, the bathing bathtub, ceramic, which is in a separate room from the grooming/drying area is all glass fronted and so I can watch everything that is happening to them at all moments, except when they go to the back for a photo record of the cut that they return to me after the next spa session right before they are returned to me. I have heard horror stories about groomers over here, who may possibly get unnecessarily aggressive with dogs during grooming as it is done in the back of the shop away from the public's eye and then the dogs have trauma associated with going to the salon and/or taking a bath. Since they were born, they have always gone to the same place with no trauma or fear and are happy to see the shop staff. (I am so grateful to have found such a wonderful salon for them!)
 

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Wow that is lucky! It sounds like they do a great job. I don't know that you could find a salon like that here. It can be hard to find a groomer that is good at poodle clips here. I'm sure it would probably cost a similar amount if one could be found. Unfortunately most good pet groomers here end up being underpaid for the amount of work they do as it is hard to find clientele that can afford the prices for pet dogs.
 

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Wow, that sounds like a great salon! You have a couple very lucky dogs.
As far as the shaved face, her breeder started them very young, so when I got her at eight weeks she already had a shaved face. That said, Gracie did go through a period where she was resistant to the shaving. I wound up bringing her to a groomer who breeds poodles because I thought I was in over my head. The groomer had no trouble with her, Gracie probably sensed my nervousness at grooming such a small pup and acted accordingly. She went to that groomer four times and then I took back over. She’s been fine ever since.
 

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Since Isabelle was a wee pup, they had her cut with this kind of fluffy snout? style. I had always seen shaved faces in America, and had originally wanted it for sanitary reasons (No water or food residue). I had them shave her feet two or three times over the years, but she didn't like it when the hair grew back (maybe itchy, according to the vet) and she started licking and scratching at her feet, so I gave up. Have you ever heard about that itchiness around the face?
Over here, there is no 'tipping system' for restaurants, hair salon, groomers, or taxis, so I think the basic grooming prices may be a little higher than other countries.
One thing over here, most shops have an in-house test before grooming school graduates are allowed to handle customer's dogs. I heard it takes a few years to rise to the ranks of grooming poodles/ bischon frizes etc. Another thing, I think, is that before a groomer is allowed to open a salon, they have to have a certain number of years working in a salon as well as some other qualifications relating to care of pets; vet technician, dog handler etc.
Is it the same in your area? (They also started this system for all dog breeders. Without this license it is illegal to sell any puppies your dog might have.)
 
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