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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Oh boy. I can understand your ambivalence. On the one hand, it would be handy to get an alert about an episode before you hit the floor. On the other hand, you don't want to be trying to manage a jittery unpredictable Peggy at the same time you are also dealing with your immediate medical crisis.
Exactly. I suspect she’s reacting to the surge of adrenaline, which I’m not sure I could train out of her even if I tried. Her behaviour is consistent with the results of this study:

When exposed to the fear sweat sample the dogs had a higher heart rate and tended to ignore the stranger, seeking comfort from their owner. With the ‘happy’ odor sample, the dogs appeared more relaxed and less cautious towards the stranger, sniffing them inquisitively.

 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Of course Peggy was upset.She was probably scared for you. Medical issues are so far from norm. Peggy picked up on that. Think she could alert you with some training. You will have to figure out what is best for both of you. Sorry your illness is popping up again. Sending ((HUGS)) your way.
Thanks, @Asta's Mom. Big hugs right back!
 

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I’m sorry about your flare. When I have an episode, I feel it coming and I sit as fast as possible to avoid passing out. If you don’t have enough time to react, then I would think having Peggy alert you is a good thing.

I hope you can ret and feel better soon.
 

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I feel for you, while I have no suggestions for a service dog, my 38 year old daughter has POTS, EDS and has just been diagnosed with Ménière’s disease. Her cat tends to respond to her episodes, keeping close and giving her emotional support. We also noticed that our Miniature Finn picks up on her episodes and tends to nudge himself under her hand or tuck himself up beside her. They are not easy conditions to manage and to the outside world you look well and normal. But the reality is you have little control over your autonomic system. Sending gentle hugs to you, and I hope you find a good way forward with Peggy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I feel for you, while I have no suggestions for a service dog, my 38 year old daughter has POTS, EDS and has just been diagnosed with Ménière’s disease. Her cat tends to respond to her episodes, keeping close and giving her emotional support. We also noticed that our Miniature Finn picks up on her episodes and tends to nudge himself under her hand or tuck himself up beside her. They are not easy conditions to manage and to the outside world you look well and normal. But the reality is you have little control over your autonomic system. Sending gentle hugs to you, and I hope you find a good way forward with Peggy.
Ahhh. Your daughter and I would have lots to chat about, I think. :)

It took a while to rule out Ménière’s, as I have so many overlapping symptoms. I also have suspected EDS, but I’ve been too overwhelmed these past few years to seek an official diagnosis. Just knowing I have a joint hypermobility spectrum disorder has been helpful for management.

You’re so right about the unique challenges of having an invisible health condition. Adds a whole extra layer of complexity, and was especially hard before I had a clue what was going on with me. I’m sure your daughter can relate. Luckily, the older I get, and the better I understand my body, the easier it’s getting to advocate for myself. I hope the same is true for your daughter.
 

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She is her own best advocate now, but it’s been a difficult road for her to travel and to get the right support. She is one of the people who has found lockdown a bonus, as losing her daily commute into London allowed her to balance her life/work.
You would have a lot in common, talking with others that understand has helped her, she has found a lot of support in groups with similar conditions and she says it always allows her to feel grateful daily for what she can do, rather than think of what she can’t.
it is hard to deal with and I can imagine the reluctance to add another label to what is your life, but my daughter has found it helped her come to terms with what is going on in her body and to listen to her body rather than keep pushing through, which is what she thought she had to do…being a young, single independent woman. As her Mum I’m proud that she keeps going as best she can, but now asks for assistance when she needs it.
I hope your flare up is brief, rest and take care of yourself.
 

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Tuck the Miniature Poodle, May 2021
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I have an orthostatic intolerance issue too (currently have doctors debating if it’s POTS or orthostatic hypotension) along with probably gastroparesis and am waiting for evaluation for EDS. It’s a lot to handle and I can only imagine it makes Peggy anxious. I’ve yet to have an episode of any of my major medical issues since getting Tuck, I guess we’ll see how he handles it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I have an orthostatic intolerance issue too (currently have doctors debating if it’s POTS or orthostatic hypotension) along with probably gastroparesis and am waiting for evaluation for EDS. It’s a lot to handle and I can only imagine it makes Peggy anxious. I’ve yet to have an episode of any of my major medical issues since getting Tuck, I guess we’ll see how he handles it.
Ahh! Welcome to the club. ;)

My best advice with Tuck is to do a lot of off-leash walking practice in a heel position. It’s amazing how much damage even small dogs can do to these joints of ours. Peggy is fine 99% of the time, like my old little girl Gracie was, but all it takes is a sudden jerk on the leash to pull my shoulder out. And shoulder recovery is such a beast. (I’m still recovering from a dislocation that happened right at the start of covid....while I was reaching my arm back to put on my jacket. :rolleyes:)

Luckily, off-leash training in a safe area can be super fun, especially for puppies. Peggy still loves trying to stick to me as I do laps around the yard.
 

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Tuck the Miniature Poodle, May 2021
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Ahh! Welcome to the club. ;)

My best advice with Tuck is to do a lot of off-leash walking practice in a heel position. It’s amazing how much damage even small dogs can do to these joints of ours. Peggy is fine 99% of the time, like my old little girl Gracie was, but all it takes is a sudden jerk on the leash to pull my shoulder out. And shoulder recovery is such a beast. (I’m still recovering from a dislocation that happened right at the start of covid....while I was reaching my arm back to put on my jacket. :rolleyes:)

Luckily, off-leash training in a safe area can be super fun, especially for puppies. Peggy still loves trying to stick to me as I do laps around the yard.
Yeah, my parents had a lab who was a serious puller and he was a big boy. I used to have to tether his leash around my waist to walk him or else he’d just yank me down the street and pull me off balance. Loose leash walking is a priority training point for us, and hopefully off leash too although we have less opportunities for that where we live.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Yeah, my parents had a lab who was a serious puller and he was a big boy. I used to have to tether his leash around my waist to walk him or else he’d just yank me down the street and pull me off balance. Loose leash walking is a priority training point for us, and hopefully off leash too although we have less opportunities for that where we live.
Leashes are required pretty much everywhere around here, too. Plus, Peggy is not 100% reliable (not many dogs are). But I find that off-leash training creates a great foundation for loose-leash skills, and it’s such a fun bonding activity with a puppy.

On that note, your pics of Tuck give me serious puppy fever! Keep ‘em coming, please.
 

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Tuck the Miniature Poodle, May 2021
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Leashes are required pretty much everywhere around here, too. Plus, Peggy is not 100% reliable (not many dogs are). But I find that off-leash training creates a great foundation for loose-leash skills, and it’s such a fun bonding activity with a puppy.

On that note, your pics of Tuck give me serious puppy fever! Keep ‘em coming, please.
Yeah I need to find a place to practice, our yard isn’t fenced so that makes it a bit harder.

I take so many photos haha. I just started him an Instagram even, but it’s hard not to take a million photos of a puppy so cute.

480188
 

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I was diagnosed with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome a few years ago, but I’ve likely had it my whole life secondary to a connective tissue disorder.


I’m wondering if there are some ways Peggy might be able to help me manage my symptoms. She’s shown some interest in my elevated heart rate once I’m already lying down, but doesn’t seem to notice it when I’m standing (which is when I could really use an alert).

Just putting this out there in case any current Poodle Forum members (or folks who are just googling “POTS service dog”) have any insights on training POTS-specific tasks to a poodle.

My one concern would be making her more protective of me than she already is. That’s not something I want.
I have EDS and POTS and a task I have Vera do to help with POTS episodes is to stand or lay on my chest. the increased proprioception helps.
 
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