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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seems this might fit in grooming the groomers I have used do this.

Do the standards need theirs sqeezed often or much at all? I know my Poms do every few months. I can always tell when Aoki does she skis along the carpet on her hiney:doh:
 

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I've NEVER done it to my boxermix, and she's never had a problem. It seems to me that smaller breeds have a bigger problem with it. However, if you have a large dog that's prone to nervousness, I'd get it done on a regular basis else your dog could express them when it gets nervous (carpet, car.. that stuff is rank.)
 

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generally speaking, if it's gonna be a problem, it's more commonly a problem in the smaller dogs. But also, if you start squeezing them a lot, they are rather inclined to then NEED squeezed a lot... If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
 

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What are the signs it needs done?
is it something that the groomer should just notice needs to be done?

I was told that ALL poodles need it done because "its buried deeper in them"...from the groomers responses my source was wrong xD
 

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I was told that ALL poodles need it done because "its buried deeper in them"...from the groomers responses my source was wrong xD
:pound: Dont have them done unless they need it. As FD said, the more you do it, the more they need it done. I do not want my groomer to express Rileys anal glands. If a dog is scooting on the floors or chewing/licking alot at their hind ends then you should go to your Vet and have them expressed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
........maybe it's best I check with the Vet on this one:) I know my poms have to have it done and any groomer I spoke with asked me specifically about this, maybe it is a small breed process more so than any and if so that makes me happy, and my dogs too:)
 

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I refuse to do anal glands. I won't do them on my own dog because A. I think it's gross and B. if I do it wrong he can get an infection. Best to leave stuff like that up to the vet in my opinion. Also if it's a large breed dog, most large breeds don't need it done as their stool presses the area anyway.
 

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Yeah, I'd only ask a vet to get it done if your dog is experiencing discomfort. I don't do anal glances unless owners specifically ask for it done.
 

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generally speaking, if it's gonna be a problem, it's more commonly a problem in the smaller dogs. But also, if you start squeezing them a lot, they are rather inclined to then NEED squeezed a lot... If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
I agree with flyingduster... if you start doing it you'll have to do it more and more. Anal glands are usually expressed naturally when the dog goes to the bathroom... a sign that they need to be done is they'll drag their bum or lick at it constantly.
Our collie had never had it done in the 14 years we had her... we did Ponki's once and now we have to do it every 2 weeks. So as flyingduster said... if it ain't broke, why fix it?
 

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Sometimes, without warning, we'll get "that smell" from one of the dogs while they're doing nothing more than jumping up on the couch or chair, or playing around in the living room (my eloquent husband will exclaim, "Someone butt-juiced!!" Isn't he special??) :) Anyway, when that happens, I wonder if the glands need expressing... I don't do my own dogs, Hannah's have been done at the vets previously and Meau's get checked when she's being groomed, but I don't think they automatically express them - just check them and then let us know if they're full and need attention... Juliet's never smell and I haven't really noticed anything from Lucy yet...

It's unusual then, that the big dogs are the ones that seem to have an occasional odor issue from glands? And yes, they do really, really reek!
 

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Yeah.. anal glands is an awful smell x_x if I had to describe it, I'd say it was a mixture between poop, blood, and peanut butter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My small ones have only had it done 3 times thats it. But Aoki never smells although I have read and been told dogs will smell like plumcrazy said. Aoki never leaves "tracks" she just seems to itch, and she is very private about it lol - almost prissy. But not doing this IF only when the dog needs it can cause serious infection so I think it's important to check on it and agree if its' not a problem let it go, but be aware it could be if dogs are constipated or the other extreme it can build up. FUN FUN.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah.. anal glands is an awful smell x_x if I had to describe it, I'd say it was a mixture between poop, blood, and peanut butter.
I could not do it! Do they bleed?
 

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LOL Peanut Butter??? GROSS.

I never heard of that before hehehehe.

I think they smell kind of fishy-poopy-musky.
 

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Most anal gland issues are diet related. And as mentioned, they should NOT be expressed regularly unless the dog is showing signs that they need to be expressed (scooting, licking, etc.). If they are not having issues, expressing them regularly will CAUSE issues as they can reduce or lose their ability to express them naturally on their own. The ingredients in the food can affect the consistency of the fluid in the glands, causing difficulty expressing naturally. Soft stool or small, thin stool may not apply enough pressure to the glands to allow them to express naturally. (soft or thin stool can be caused by intestinal conditions like IBD, food allergies, or poor quality food. Increasing fiber and/or changing diet may help). Less commonly, the positioning of the glands may cause them to not be properly expressed when the dog defecates. In this case the glands will need to be expressed as needed and some dogs (if the glands are requiring expression more than once a month) may benefit from having the glands removed.

If anal glands need to be expressed it should be done by someone qualified and well trained. Externally expressing glands is generally less effective and poses more risk (partially due to inexperience or lack of knowledge). Internal expression is more effective, however in either case if the person is not well trained or experienced, they can cause more damage to the dog. If an anal gland becomes infected/impacted, there is an increased risk of damage and someone who doesn't know what they're doing may easily harm the dog.
 

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I do not express my dogs anal glands, and I generally request that my vet not do it either. My one dog, if she gets super excited and barks really really hard, has on two occasions, uh, spit a little out on the floor. When I mentioned that to my vet he said to express them, but I asked him not to, I didn't do it, and the problem resolved itself.

You know how frozen juice comes in concentrate form, and it's super potent? That's how I describe anal gland goo. Poop concentrate. Ugh.
 

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My one dog, if she gets super excited and barks really really hard, has on two occasions, uh, spit a little out on the floor..
Anal glands serve two main purposes:
*Scent marking/identification: a small amount of the fluid is released as the dog defecates. Also, the high "alert" position of the tail is a trigger for a small amount of the fluid to be released, so a dog who meets a new dog and raises his tail, or a dog who is being hostile/protective/territorial toward a perceived threat (especially another dog or person). The raised tail often causes a small release of the fluid. This is one reason dogs will sniff each others rear ends, they are identifying the other dog by it's unique scent. So raised tail = possible release of anal gland fluid. This is probably what happened with your dog. If your dog had trouble expressing the glands, then they likely wouldn't have expressed so easily when the dog was worked up.

*Fear/stress: A dog who is extremely scared or stressed may express their anal glands. This is especially true for dogs who feel like they're being attacked, whether it be during an actual fight with another dog, restraint at the vet's office, or an accidental injury to the dog.

Interesting fact: "Playing possum" is actually derived from truth, Possums will play dead if they are threatened and have no other means of defense or escape. One component of their act is voluntarily expressing their anal glands. This gives their apparent carcass a rotting, dead smell which deters predators from eating them. And of course, most famous is the skunk for it's ability to spray it's anal gland secretions to defend itself. Ferrets also have anal glands that can emit a similar skunky odor at will. When a ferret is "descented" it's anal glands are removed, however the musky ferret smell is secreted from scent glands in the skin, so descenting only removes the infrequent expression of the anal glands and not the general ferret smell.
 

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I have a ferret, and she "poofs" if she's scared, and that's it. but even without the "poof" she's musky. I like the smell though, it reminds me of honey, or baby powder.
 
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