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I was at the pet store this weekend to pick up a bag of Orijen Puppy for Rudy. He's 9 months old now so I'm starting to consider when/if to transition him to Orijen adult or something else. Right now he is thriving on the puppy food with Rawble added, freeze dried apples and bananas, sweet potatoes and green beans.
The gal that waited on me told me she feeds her 9 month old Natural and Delicious aby Farmina because it is from Italy and the European regulatory agency is stricter than the U.S. agency (AAFCO).
I'm probably never going to a raw diet but would like to continue with a high quality kibble supplemented with fresh/cooked or freeze dried.
Please, jump in with your thoughts!!!
 

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Well I'm old school and if he is doing well on the Orijen (rated highly) I'd probably just continue doing what I'm doing only with the adult version. Farmina is also highly rated but you would have to transition to it, using the 25%/50%/75/100% over 4 weeks to avoid any upset stomach.
 

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I tend to agree Mufar42 but always rely on the opinion of this forum and experienced people like you! I did get a sample so I tried about 5 kibbles and he was fine so I added about 5 to his morning food the next morning and he threw up his breakfast! He NEVER throws up so I threw the samples away.
Do you give yours egg and sardines? Cooked egg? Mashed up sardines? How often and how much for a 17# minipoo? OR should I start another thread? :)
 

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I'd leave your questions here, but I don't have the info. Renn is a standard. I don't add anything but some canned meat 1 tablespoon and I crumble up some dehydrated turkey or fish on top, with each meal. I've read giving sardines is good but I don't like the smell. I'm sure other mini people can give you better advise than me on this.
 

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Standard here too but will give both scrambled egg or sardines occasionally to vary his food topping. He loves both.
 

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I very rarely give eggs, just preference. When I do, it’s cooked and I also ground the shell. Sardines, maybe once a month? Not consistent anyways. I used canned in water and give him 1/3, usually with eggs, but this is a rare treat. As for the kibble, you are already feeding a high quality kibble, I personally wont change it. If you do, maybe stick to the same brand but different flavours.

Ps, I switched to adult at 9 months but he is currently eating all life stages. Do you have an oversized mini? Wow! Pretty solid at 17lbs.
 

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Do you give yours egg and sardines? Cooked egg? Mashed up sardines? How often and how much for a 17# minipoo? OR should I start another thread? :)
Following, as my mini is only a month younger and a pound lighter than yours (8 mos 16 lbs) and I often have similar questions re: feeding. Right now he's on Fromm Puppy Gold kibble (planning on switching to Four Star next bag), and I would like to give some fresh food on occasion.

Yesterday morning I was cracking eggs to make poached eggs for me and DH, and accidentally broke a yolk. I really wanted a good poached egg so didn't want to use it, and hated to let it go to waste, so I decided to let the pup have it. I threw it in a nonstick pan (no butter or oil), let it cook for a couple minutes each side so it was almost "over hard," and then put it on a plate and broke it up with a spatula. Our mini poo loved it!
 

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As many of you may recall I home cook for our dogs, but all of them started on kibble. On a general note you can switch from puppy to all life stages or adult pretty much any time after they are between 6-8 months old if they seem not to be adding much height (might be later than 6-8 months for a spoo). I also think if the pup has done well on a particular brand I would continue with it as an adult.


Remember that no commercially prepared dog food will be as good as human grade food (although with all of our food recalls recently on can have doubts about human food too). A lot of dog health issues seem to be linked to the onset of using commercially prepared foods. That is partly why I switched to home cooking, but I also had such a limited ingredient list that I could use to give a nutritionally complete diet that was the same (except for portion size) for all three dogs. I have an extreme aversion to the idea of Peeves carrying raw chicken around the house and putting it down to eat it wherever he decided to stop (and I know he would do that) and that is the main reason I didn't go in for raw, but I also don't think feeding domestic dogs in a manner to approximate a wolf diet has much reasonable rationale either. The poodle on the floor next to you or in your lap right not is simply not a wolf it is the descendant of many many many generations of dogs that got fed cooked leftovers from human meals.
 
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Yeah I also am sort of dumbstruck by the bad rap that grains get these days. Dogs are omnivores not obligate carnivores (cats are though) and as long as a particular dog is not allergic/intolerant/sensitive to a given grain it is not sensible to feed totally grain free. Grains are what our bodies (us and our dogs) use to make ATP energy to power cell work and should be important as that sort of caloric energy source. Proteins are eaten to acquire amino acids to build new proteins not to burn as calories for ATP energy. If sufficient carbs aren't consumed then nutritional deficiencies of amino acids may result in things like muscle mass loss.
 
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