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I used the Seresto collar for my toy poodle puppy last summer, and it worked well warding off fleas and ticks. However, what I didn't like was that whenever I kissed my dog's hair, it felt like I had a film of some chemical on my lips! Our toy poodle also sleeps in our bed, so I'm sure the chemical from the collar was all over the sheets. Yuk. I'm not a fan of giving my little toy an ingestible like Bravecto, and I want to see if I can avoid the Advantix/Frontline systemic stuff.
I'm in search of an all natural flea and tick treatment, and from the research I've done Cedar Oil and Rose Geranium Oil both work well. I saw a product named Cedarcide that I will try. Has anyone tried this product for tick/flea control, and does it work? I also will try the Rose Geranium Oil (there are two types, Pelagonium Graveolens oil or Pelagonium Capitatum Xradens oil) not sure if anyone has experience as to which is better? Also, would love to hear about any other natural flea and tick treatments that you've used that you found actually work....
 

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Are you in a high risk area?

Because I've not tried any preventatives (natural or otherwise, other than keeping my dogs as healthy as possible, and maintaining a clean, clutter-free living space), but I did use a lemon solution when my last girl got fleas at a beachfront rental and it worked immediately.
 

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I'm no help here, living in a high tick, flea area, southern & humid all my dogs get NexGard. No more flea problems here and once a year a yard spray, with occasional Diatomaceous earth (human grade).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Are you in a high risk area?

Because I've not tried any preventatives (natural or otherwise, other than keeping my dogs as healthy as possible, and maintaining a clean, clutter-free living space), but I did use a lemon solution when my last girl got fleas at a beachfront rental and it worked immediately.
Interesting about the lemon solution! Guess fleas don't like that acidic environment. Was it just lemon juice and water that you bathed her in? We are in the Northeast, which is a high risk area for ticks and Lyme disease.
 

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Interesting about the lemon solution! Guess fleas don't like that acidic environment. Was it just lemon juice and water that you bathed her in? We are in the Northeast, which is a high risk area for ticks and Lyme disease.
It was a sliced lemon steeped overnight in boiled water. Bathed Gracie with the solution and then let her dry in the sun. We also vacuumed the house with our Dyson and thoroughly washed all linens with hot water. Never saw another flea.

Apparently the drying in the sun was key. I wish I could find the original source of these instructions.

Should add: I recommended this treatment to a woman whose dog had been suffering quite some time, and either he had open sores from all the bites or she made the solution far too strong (or both) but it was horribly painful for the dog. I'd only ever recommend it now at the very first sign of fleas.

I have also read that lemon oil can be a good deterrent, so maybe that's worth looking into. I'm not sure if it's used topically or just around the house, but oils are very potent so use with caution.
 

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Having just seen yesterday a dog dying of complications from Lyme disease, I would not be willing to risk trying a natural remedy that has not been studied. I also know that many essential oils can be irritating or toxic to dogs depending on the concentration.
Personally I like Nexgard, but Advantix is also good and it stays in the skin and doesn't get absorbed all the way into the dog's system. Applying some Vitamin E oil at the same time helps prevent potential irritation.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Having just seen yesterday a dog dying of complications from Lyme disease, I would not be willing to risk trying a natural remedy that has not been studied. I also know that many essential oils can be irritating or toxic to dogs depending on the concentration.
Personally I like Nexgard, but Advantix is also good and it stays in the skin and doesn't get absorbed all the way into the dog's system. Applying some Vitamin E oil at the same time helps prevent potential irritation.
I agree that you have to be careful with essential oils. I'm considering going with a topical like Avantix, but wanted to see if there was something more natural that actually works. I could never give an animal an ingestible / chewable flea/tick pill like Bravecto or Nextguard, especially a small dog like a toy or mini poodle. The chewables/ intgestibles contain a pesticide called isoxazoline, which has been found by the FDA to cause nerve reactions in pets, including seizures. It is basically giving a dog a pesticide to swallow. This is just one of many articles I've seen about the dangers of the chewables:
Flea and tick pills can cause nerve reactions in pets, FDA warns
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Also wanted to mention that I do have a friend that gives her dog the Bravecto chewable, but she also has a cat, and many of the topicals, like Advantix, and harmful to cats, so she feels like the chewables are her only choice. That said, she knows that it's not good for her dog. Here's the FDA warning on the chewables:
Thus the reason for the original post: Any all natural flea/tick products out there that you found actually work?
 

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I wonder what holistic vets would have to say about this? We've got one about an hour away from us that I'd like to consult with at some point. Do you have one nearby?
Good idea PeggyTheParti, I just googled it and there's one in the next town over. I take my dog to a traditional vet, and I'm very traditional about most things healthcare related for both my family and my dog. However, I'd like to go more natural with the flea/tick treatments. I'm going to try this Cedarcide spray. It also comes in a stronger tick spray, but that's only for dogs over 20 pounds. It gets good reviews...
https://www.amazon.com/Repellent-formerly-Cedarcide-Original-Mosquitoes/dp/B01I47HGSE/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?keywords=cedarcide&qid=1580942145&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyVkZMR0xGUUpDWE44JmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMjU4ODU0MkEzUUhTSkhaRFM4RSZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwNTc1ODkxMkozRUY4UDQ5Qlc3SiZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

This is the one for bigger dogs, wish I could use it on my little guy but he's too small:
 

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Vets have very little training in the area of traditional preventatives, like nutrition. Unfortunately, that creates a vacuum which tends to get filled with snake oil salesmen and hearsay.

If you do make an appointment with that vet, I'd be very interested to hear what he or she has to say! Good luck :)
 

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Also wanted to mention that I do have a friend that gives her dog the Bravecto chewable, but she also has a cat, and many of the topicals, like Advantix, and harmful to cats, so she feels like the chewables are her only choice. That said, she knows that it's not good for her dog. Here's the FDA warning on the chewables:
Thus the reason for the original post: Any all natural flea/tick products out there that you found actually work?
It's important to know that the FDA is not conducting laboratory studies on these products, they are simply gathering reports of adverse drug events from owners, vets, and clinics.

"It is important to remember that for any given ADE report ... there is no certainty that the reported drug caused the adverse event/outcome," the FDA said. "Confounding factors may include underlying disease, using other drugs at the same time, or other non-drug related causes."

The statement from the FDA:

  • The FDA is alerting pet owners and veterinarians of the potential for neurologic adverse events in dogs and cats when treated with drugs that are in the isoxazoline class.
  • The FDA-approved drugs in this class are Bravecto (fluralaner) tablets for dogs, Bravecto (fluralaner) topical solution for cats and dogs, Nexgard (afoxalaner) tablets for dogs, Simparica (sarolaner) tablets for dogs, Credelio (lotilaner) tablets for dogs, and Revolution Plus (selamectin and sarolaner) topical solution for cats. These products are approved for the treatment and prevention of flea infestations, and the treatment and control of tick infestations. Revolution Plus is also approved for prevention of heartworm disease, treatment and control of ear mite infestations and some gastrointestinal parasite infections.
  • Although these products can and have been safely used in the majority of dogs and cats, pet owners should consult with their veterinarian to review their patients’ medical histories and determine whether a product in the isoxazoline class is appropriate for their pet.
  • The FDA considers products in the isoxazoline class to be safe and effective for dogs and cats but is providing this information so that pet owners and veterinarians can take it into consideration when choosing flea and tick products for their pets.
  • Isoxazoline products have been associated with neurologic adverse reactions, including muscle tremors, ataxia, and seizures in some dogs and cats;
  • Although most dogs and cats haven’t had neurologic adverse reactions, seizures may occur in animals without a prior history;
  • Many products are available for prevention and control of flea and tick infestations. You can discuss all options with your veterinarian to choose the right product for your pet.
The FDA is working with the manufacturers to have the info added to the product label.


I don't add this explanation to try to change opinions but to give a clearer understanding of the FDA's role in many of the public alerts.
 

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Thanks for the input, Rose n Poos. It's definitely good to be informed, especially if your poodle starts having a reaction, something as small as an irritation or as big as a seizure, and you don't think to trace it back to a topical or chewable flea/tick treatment. I'm sure there are many dogs who have no reaction at all.

I think of my human kids, and I've definitely sprayed them with DEET in the summer to ward off the mosquitos, so I'm not as "all-natural" as you may think. However, I wouldn't give my kids a DEET-like pill to swallow to ward off the mosquitos. It's just what you're comfortable with. We all obviously love our poodles, or else we wouldn't be on here talking about them, and everyone does what works best for their families and fur babies, no judgement, just sharing information.

We are in the dead of winter right now where I live, so I won't have to worry about the flea/tick treatment until the spring thaw, but thought I'd get a jump start to see if anyone had any good natural suggestions. I will keep everyone posted on my results with the Cedarcide spray this spring. I've also heard of people using the a drop or two of Rose Geranium Oil, mixed with a carrier oil (like coconut oil), safely on dogs to prevent fleas and ticks, and will try that as well. As much as I don't like the cold and snow, it's nice not to have to worry about the fleas and ticks.
Thanks to everyone for your different perspectives and feedback!
 

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Good idea PeggyTheParti, I just googled it and there's one in the next town over. I take my dog to a traditional vet, and I'm very traditional about most things healthcare related for both my family and my dog. However, I'd like to go more natural with the flea/tick treatments. I'm going to try this Cedarcide spray. It also comes in a stronger tick spray, but that's only for dogs over 20 pounds. It gets good reviews...
Amazon.com : Natural Cedar Oil Insect Repellent formerly known as Best Yet now called Cedarcide Original (Pint) Biting Insect Spray Kills and Repels Mosquitoes Ticks Fleas and Chiggers : Garden & Outdoor

This is the one for bigger dogs, wish I could use it on my little guy but he's too small:
I have used Cedarcide spray for my yard and found it helpful and seems to work well for ants too.
 
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