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Discussion Starter #1
What is your opinion about a puppy showing agression at such an early age of 10 weeks? I would go stroke tilly another little poodle same family and she would turn her head growl show her teeth and bite not hard though. She did it when she is often in the corner watching us and I would go up to her tp pet or play. Also she just got hurt a slight bruise hip from jumping on a rock after getting a bite we think. The vet doesn't know what caused it as there were no marks just a hurt hip. And we would go stroke her and her temper was there towards the nurse, vet, and when we got home to me. I talked to a trainer she said it was abnormal for a puppy to show this kind of agression. What are your thoughts and what could I do to stop her from having this fear and temper?
 

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Oh wow =/ That seems pretty serious, dogs normally seem to bite when they're scared or in pain, so maybe she's afraid of getting hurt again and trying the only way she knows to defend herself?

Try carrying treats around maybe? Coax her but only do it when she's calm. Don't quote me on this, I'm no professional trainer.. in my job I just muzzle aggressive dogs and shave them as fast as possible to reduce stress on everyone.
 

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It's been my experience a lot of dogs in the vet office or groomers who are cornered, or in a small room (especially with their owners) will show aggression toward someone coming toward them. So this I don't think is abnormal...

As far as at home has she always done it? Or only after this vet visit?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Always done it for a second it would last. Now its more after her vet visit. She did get depressed after getting shots too for a couple of hours so I don't know whether she sensitive oh and this could add to it. She was the runt of the litter.
 

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If I were you, I would make an appointment with a behaviorist (not an obedience trainer) to come to your house and evaluate your puppy to make sure you don't have something very serious going on here. She is still young, and if this is something serious, there is time to hopefully fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If I were you, I would make an appointment with a behaviorist (not an obedience trainer) to come to your house and evaluate your puppy to make sure you don't have something very serious going on here. She is still young, and if this is something serious, there is time to hopefully fix it.
The thing is that this is my grandmas poodle tilly chilly and when we got her the first day she showed this agression. After that she was fine. Then we moved houses she showed it again once on the first day. Then she got hurt and showed it a lot until now as she is feeling better again. 2 days later. I thought it was her being scared but I am just not certain and I don't want her to do this with my 6 year old sister or grandma. Plus she showed this with my dog penny during feeding time and when I gave them both treats and she finished hers and went up to penny wanting hers. I just want her to snap out of this behavior or atleast I want to know what are the possible reasons for her mean behavior. She has been spoilt played with my penny and my fiance poodle honey fine its just she has this mood swings almost. Very confusing to me.
 

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That's exactly why I suggest that you contact a behaviorist. They can come to your house, evaluate the puppy and suggest the best course of action to change this behavior so no one gets hurt in the future. There are great people on here with lots of knowledge and we can give you lots of good ideas, but we are not there in person and cannot see what is going on.
 

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I'm a bit confused. How old is Tilly now? Where does she live? How many dogs are in the home. Who are these other dogs and how old are they? What variety are they (Toy/Mini/Standard)? Where did they come from (pet store/breeder/rescue).

Also, I don't mean to be rude, but I find it difficult to understand you because you tend to write using a stream of consciousness style. Could you use a more standard sentence structure with punctuation and capitalization? Your thoughts are getting lost in the mix.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Tilly is a mintaure poodle who lives with my grandma. She is 3 months now. The other dog was my minature poodle puppy who is 4 months. We got her from a breeder. Tilly has showed her teethe and bit when I would go up to pet/play with her or the other dogs her sister and my poddle when we got her at age 10 weeks. She stopped it after she was settled into our home. She would only do it the first day of moving. Then she got hurt a couple of days ago and did it to the vet and nurse. Then we got home and did it to me a couple of times. I know that she was in pain this time. But it doesn't explain this when she was younger. I am just wondering why before I get a behavorist and do my research so to speak. She was the runt of the litter. I guess they had to clear her mouth and give a her a couple of compressions as she wasn't breathing and had fluid in her lungs. I was wondering whether this traumatic experience for her would make her be this way. If anyone has had experience with the runts of litters do they behave a certain way more abnormal to healthier pups of the same litter? I'm not sure. She is a cutie and I would hate to see her in any distress. I just would like to fix the problem if I could just figure out her problem.
 

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Ginger had fear agresson from the time she was a puppy - I had to get a personal trainer to break her of it - and it worked - mostly - she still is jumpy but friendly when I say "friend"
 

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Ok. Now I have a better understanding.

First. No. Being the runt does not make a dog more aggressive or more shy. It usually just means that in the uterine horns it did not get as many resources as its littermates.

I would say that Tilly has an innately fearful temperament. She is what we call "sharp shy". When dogs that are sharp shy get especially worried or nervous, they tend to lash out.

In Tilly's case, when she left her breeder and came home, it took her out of her known element and she felt threatened so she tried to protect herself. Then, when she got hurt and had to go to the vet, she lashed out again.

We sometimes see this temperament in Minis. I think part of it is innate since Minis tend to be more reactive dogs, but I also think breeders could do more to social their puppies and expose them to different stimuli before they go to their new homes.

Sharp Shyness is very hard to break because it is hard to teach a dog to be... well... braver. I am NOT a behaviorist, but if this were my dog I would devote huge amounts of time to building Tilly's confidence.

I would take her everywhere and start introducing her to people, animals, traffic, construction, stores. You name it. I would always have a pocket of treats. I would have everyone who encounters her feed her treats. At home, get Tilly used to being handled in every way possible. She needs to be petted, groomed, have her toys taken away, have hands put in her food bowl when she is eating etc. I would party, party, praise every time Tilly showed some gumption and graciously submitted to the contact.

At home I would also implement the Nothing in Life is Free training system (google it). I would work hard to be a very strong leader who sets clear, well defined boundaries. Tilly should always wear a leash in the house and she should always be tethered to a person. This will make Tilly feel safer and having a strong leader means that she won't get worried about having to make decisions.

Starting an obedience program will help too. Nothing builds confidence in a Poodle like having a real job to do and feeling like they are good at that job.

Finally, again I'm not a behaviorist, but I would not tolerate any show of aggression in my home against people. If my puppy growled at me (or someone else), it would get a collar pop, a stern warning, and it would need to go through a series of obedience exercises (down, come, sit, heel etc) so that it gets it into its head that I'm the leader and that the dog works for me not the other way around.
 

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cbrand, You may not be a behaviorist but it sure sounds like you have done plenty of research. Sounds like some excellent advice to me. Also sounds like common sense training.
 

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Hi, just read this, there is lots of good advise here. The idea is to be the centre of the universe to the dog.

Mins can be sharper, I had a couple who thought they should be kings! Don't ever go over to her to pet her, call her to you for fuss or attention. When she comes over of her own free will, mega praise and always have something really tasty; I use hotdog sausage cut up real small. Also anyone she is fearful of; give them some treat to offer her.

Remain calm in tense situations with her, keep your face expressionless so she can't tell if you are stressed with her.

I can heartily recommend agility training to built an unbeatable relationship with you girl. It has worked magic on far harder cases than her.

Good luck with her
 
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