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Benjamin Franlkin - Senior Tpoo, Apple Butter - mpoo puppy
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We just had to euthanize our lovely old gal, MooMoo. Apple Butter, who is 6 months old, really misses her.

Our plan has always been to eventually get another puppy (or older poodle) after MooMoo died. But since she has died while Apple Butter is so young, I'm questioning our timeline.

If we got on a breeder list now for a puppy in a year, would that be a good age gap? 1.5 years? Or is that too soon? Apple is doing well in her training and her temperament is beautiful, but I seem to remember 1 year old dogs always being the biggest pain in the butt. I dont want to get anywhere close to "littermate syndrome" or have to deal with training TWO dogs who need major manners work. But I also really want somebody for Apple to play with and I'd love another dog to warm our couch with us.

I hate to sound callous, like I just want to rush out and replace Mya Moo, but she's left a big hole in our lives and I know some of the most in-demand breeders have quite long waits right now.
 

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I think there is no set age but rather when the current dog is well adjusted and has gone through adolescence. I wouldn’t want to add a puppy with a teenager, that would be a nightmare...
 

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Beatrice was 11 months when I brought home 20 week old Pia, Beatrice was as monster puppy but she grew up quick.
As Decho said when the first pup is mature and traines.
 

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I'm so sorry about MooMoo. I think a first dog at 1.5-2 yrs could be a decent time to bring in a puppy. It's bound to take a while with the waitlists as they are so I don't think there's any harm in starting to look. I think for me I'd probably prefer a dog to be past 2 years when I bring a puppy in, but it depends on how fast they mature. My reasoning is more that a puppy will disrupt training with the original dog so it's best to have their obedience pretty solid before the puppy arrives.
 

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I also think 1.5y or more would be fine for an mpoo. If you're thinking of the same breeder, since you already have a connection, you might ask them if you could be on a waitlist for that time frame but with an option to extend to a next litter if Apple seems not quite ready.
One nice thing about having a mostly trained. mostly obedient pup already is that they can help train the pup by example :).

Sleep with angels and play in the rolling green hills all day, MooMoo
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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Agree with everyone else. 1.5 years for a mpoo is a good gap but about as close as I'd want.

And I'm so sorry to hear about dear MooMoo. I hope your family is coping well.
 

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I would probably stretch out to be more like a 2+ year gap, but I certainly think 1.5 years apart is likely to be fine. Our two oldsters are 7 years ahead of Javelin, but that was more about my mindset than the age gap..
 

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Benjamin Franlkin - Senior Tpoo, Apple Butter - mpoo puppy
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We are thinking of going bigger and getting a small standard or moyen. We thought we were tiny dog people, but after being around so many bigger poodles we've decided we might size up. Our toy poodle, Benjamin Franklin, is likely to die before the year's end too, so we aren't concerned with the size difference. He has many health problems. I'd have sworn he would have died this year, but every single thing that befell him he somehow just barely managed to overcome. So who knows, really, maybe he will outlive us all.

It's so heartbreaking to watch my kids and Apple mourn for Moo. My kids went to school and drew pictures of her and shared about her death. Apple keeps sniffing at Moo's bed, and yesterday she carried around a little hairball of Mya's fur. It is really hard to be sad yourself and then in a moment when you feel OK you look and see your loved ones feeling sad and it breaks the wound open all over again.

I dont know how I would have handled Moo's death without Apple. I am so grateful for her. This morning I was sitting on the edge of my bed feeling sad and just staring into space. And then the next thing I know, there is Apple, nudging me to take her for a walk. I'm just the kind of person who always needs a dog, I guess.
 

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We are thinking of going bigger and getting a small standard or moyen.
Something to be aware of with moyen/medium/klein poodles is that the medium variety is not a recognized size in the North American registries. It is a primarily European size, recognized by the FCI. In NA, if they're over 15" they're simply smaller standards based on the breed standards. That means that very few North American breeders are trying to breed for that size. They'd be too big to show as miniatures and it would be hard to compete with the more typical standard in the conformation ring. This leaves those breeders without checks and balances so far as maintaining breed standards.

There are only a very, very few breeders in the US who are importing true medium's from the countries that recognize that size officially.

Most of the folks calling their poodles "medium" are either interbreeding standards and minis (not a well thought of idea), or they simply have miniatures who exceed the 15" limit, or standards who are on the small side of typical, so you'll need to look them over very carefully. Health testing may not be done so look even closer at these breeders.

Karbit usually comes up when someone asks for a reputable medium breeder. Recently, Noir has also been mentioned. They are importing (at least some of) their mediums and seem to be doing health testing.

The alternate suggestion is, as you mentioned, looking for standard breeders who's lines generally produce smaller sizes or miniature breeders who have occasional oversize pups.
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Good girl, Apple. Sounds like you are being a wonderful comfort to your human.

I’m so sorry for your loss, @ThePoodlesMoody. I hope that the puppy hunt provides you with just enough happy distraction to make this all a little easier. But grief has its own timeline and there’s not much we can do about it, is there. :(

As we approach Peggy’s second birthday, I feel that this would be a perfect time to get on a 12-month waitlist for a puppy. She’s a spoo, so still technically an adolescent, but there’s light at the end of the tunnel.

My mini mix matured faster. She was still getting into some mischievous adolescent trouble at two, but it was funny, silly, somewhat restrained stuff, not catastrophic. And it was nothing I’d worry would be a bad influence on a puppy. By three she was solidly an adult....and maybe we were actually both a little too set in our ways by then. There never did feel like another perfect time to bring a puppy home.

So I think catching the tail end of adolescence wouldn’t be the worst thing.
 

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You are still grieving so personally I think its not the right time. My standard also missed our boxer when he passed last year but I realized most of the signs I saw were really my grief. While he enjoyed a playmate he honestly did mis him as the rest of us did. I at times think of getting a 2nd to play with Renn but I'm not sure I want to go thru all the puppy stuff again. If the right rescue came along I may consider that though its nice having just one big dog. I've been a multiple dog home my entire life 3-4 at a time but I'm not sure I really want that anymore. These smart dogs take up so much of ones time, and the older I get I find I become over-whelmed more easily. So for now I say maybe we will see...Personally I'd wait at least 3 years, by then you will have a well trained dog to help teach a pup.
 

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Our last two dogs were exactly 1 year apart in age. I liked that they were close in age, because they had the same energy levels their whole lives. The one year gave us enough time to train and bond with the first before getting another. Puppies are a lot of work, but I thought adding the second one was easier. The older one enjoyed playing with the puppy and helped wear the second one out.
 
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