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A 2 year old Spoo is being rehomed, the owner used her for breeding doodles. I heard about it and wanted to help. Sadly she is not fixed, and would need a full vet work up immediately. After meeting her, my concern is how afraid of strangers she is. She obviously was not socialized. She was happy with the husband and wife, did not show any fear. After visiting her for 45 mins she came over and took treats from my hand but when they the food ran out, she ran away. She would come with in a foot of me but never up to me. She did not show fear of anything else and when the owner called her she came happily. The owner did admit that when people came to the house for her puppies she would sit far away and bark at everyone.
I am concerned that taking a dog out of the only environment she has know, would scare her even more and she would be aggressive. I am putting calls into trainers this morning, but would love to hear your thoughts. I also asked the owner if she would give it up to a local poodle rescue and the owner refused.
 

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I imagine you could work her thru some of the fears if you had her in your home, She would probably be fine with you given time. I'm not so sure how well she would do in public settings. I think your going the right route with checking with trainers. Only 2 and already used for breeding i sad. Depending on the rehoming fee I would take her just to get her out of that environment. I hope you find a trainer that would work with her.
 

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How much is the owner asking for this dog? They aren't going to give it to a rescue because the rescue won't pay them for the dog. I am sure a trainer will give you better advice than I can, but I honestly feel that this dog would be better off in a quieter home that doesn't have a lot of visitors.
 

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I imagine you could work her thru some of the fears if you had her in your home, She would probably be fine with you given time. I'm not so sure how well she would do in public settings. I think your going the right route with checking with trainers. Only 2 and already used for breeding i sad. Depending on the rehoming fee I would take her just to get her out of that environment. I hope you find a trainer that would work with her.
She is 2 and has already had two litters back to back! It's heartbreaking. I just spoke with her vet. She said she is up to date on shots at least and the vet did not think she would turn her stranger fear into aggression. But, the vet did not think the owner was closing down. The vet thought she was keeping her other two Spoos and would continue to breed doodles. The owner told me she was not going to breed any more and that is why I wanted to help. I think I am being lied to.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
How much is the owner asking for this dog? They aren't going to give it to a rescue because the rescue won't pay them for the dog. I am sure a trainer will give you better advice than I can, but I honestly feel that this dog would be better off in a quieter home that doesn't have a lot of visitors.
The owner wants $500. My house is not quiet. I have two teenage boys. I am not sure my house would be the best place for this girl. I would not want to scare this poor dog even more, but the house she currently is in has 2 young kids and she was not at all scared of them or the noise when I visited.
 

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The owner wants $500. My house is not quiet. I have two teenage boys. I am not sure my house would be the best place for this girl. I would not want to scare this poor dog even more, but the house she currently is in has 2 young kids and she was not at all scared of them or the noise when I visited.
I guess I do not see that amount as unreasonable. I was thinking they would ask for way more.

I rescued a poodle/poodle mix that is fearful of strangers and has some issues with surprise noises even in a home she now knows well. Initially when I rescued her, I was living by myself, but now I am living with family. She is fine unless something surprises her, and then she will charge at the noise/person and bark. When new people come into the house or people she isn't that familiar with (such as other family members), which isn't often, she will shake and bark her head off even when I am with her. It takes her 20 or more minutes to settle and follow her place command, and then she's okay as long as there isn't a lot of movement and excitement. She needs me or another person she knows well to be with her though.

This dog would probably get used to the people in the house and even some of the noises, but if you have frequent visitors it might be hard (unless you kennel the dog or teach the dog the place command and she is able to obey and get sidetracked with a treat). Again, I am not a behaviorist and someone with more experience should have better advice and options. I hope she goes to the right home. It would be sad for her to go to the wrong home only to be rehomed again. I know the rescue I got my dog from chose me for my girl because of how I described my lifestyle.
 

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I am guessing your teenagers have friends visiting, so that there is a fair amount of coming and going in your home - in which case I agree with you that it may be very difficult for this dog to adjust. I think a calm house, with another well socialised dog to reassure her, would be her best chance - are the other breeding dogs also shy, or did you not meet them? Unless you feel strongly drawn to her and are prepared to take her on as a project, and know that you have, or can get, the right skills and experience to build her confidence, I think I would pass.
 

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She is 2 and has already had two litters back to back! It's heartbreaking. I just spoke with her vet. She said she is up to date on shots at least and the vet did not think she would turn her stranger fear into aggression. But, the vet did not think the owner was closing down. The vet thought she was keeping her other two Spoos and would continue to breed doodles. The owner told me she was not going to breed any more and that is why I wanted to help. I think I am being lied to.
This would be a good reason to pass.
 

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Do you want a dog who will be timid for the rest of her life? She probably would get to be comfortable in your house, although maybe not with your kids friends coming in and out, but you probably wouldn't be able to take her anywhere without her being fearful. I have lived with two timid dogs, and it's not fun. You always have to pay attention to not upsetting the dog. She might become a fear biter, and I have lived with that, too. Not at all fun.

The second thing is that you would be supporting this person's doodle business. The same reasons for not buying a puppy mill dog apply here--you may be saving one deserving dog, but you are perpetuating the business.
 

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Honestly... I’ve learned my lesson in the recent past and would pass. When it’s right it’s right and I think you have a gut feeling with your mentions of possibly being lied to and potentially having too much action in your home for this timid dog.

It’s not the dogs fault but breeding a dog that has obvious unresolved issues and breeding her back to back at such a young age doesn’t seem like the breeder has the best intentions for this dog, her pups or potential buyers families. Not good.

I feel safe saying that also means the breeder hasn’t done appropriate health or temperament testing. This could end up a Cinderella story.., and if you proceed I hope it is- but something isn’t right here.

I wonder why the breeder is rehoming her?


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Honestly... I’ve learned my lesson in the recent past and would pass. When it’s right it’s right and I think you have a gut feeling with your mentions of possibly being lied to and potentially having too much action in your home for this timid dog.

It’s not the dogs fault but breeding a dog that has obvious unresolved issues and breeding her back to back at such a young age doesn’t seem like the breeder has the best intentions for this dog, her pups or potential buyers families. Not good.

I feel safe saying that also means the breeder hasn’t done appropriate health or temperament testing. This could end up a Cinderella story.., and if you proceed I hope it is- but something isn’t right here.

I wonder why the breeder is rehoming her?


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That should be a major concern as well. This whole situation is upsetting to me. These breeders need to go out of business. Hopefully people do their homework and do not purchase puppies from them!

My parents got their dog Gracie from a neighbor who blatantly lied to them about the history of the puppy (backyard breeder, dog store puppy, who knows) and they worked for years with a dog with major behavioral issues. It's hard not to walk away sometimes, but it's best when people are lying.
 

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I agree it is likely not a good idea. They know the dog has behavioral issues that need work, yet they are trying to sell her instead of relinquishing her to a rescue where she will get the work she needs. I would not support this. Also, she sounds like a poor fit for your family. I understand wanting to help a dog, but rehoming into a home that isn't a good fit will do the opposite. It would be a huge shock to her because she would lose the only things she feels safe around. This could cause her problems to just become worse.
 

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A lot depends on how much experience you have rehabilitating dogs. Do you have the time to devote to this dog? Do you have the financial resources to pay for private trainers and eventually classes? Or would you be better off getting a more social dog that fits in with your family from the start?

I understand wanting to rescue a dog from a bad situation. The question is, are you an experienced rescuer who knows how to help this dog? Or are you entering this heart first, hoping you can love the dog enough to fix the problems? That's why I suggested bringing a professional trainer with you for a second look. The trainer would be able to tell you if you can help this dog or if you should pass.
 

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Ideally the owner would have spayed then give her several weeks to recover in the comfort and familiarity of her own home before selling her.

Ideally the buyer would be able to visit each day for ten days, and the owner and buyer would take her on walks together, with the buyer giving her an occasional treat each time. This way the dog would get to know the buyer gradually. They should also go on several rides together in the buyer's car so traveling with the buyer won't freak it out.

If the buyer (you) has teenage kids, after a few times they kids should join in the walks. I'm very reserved, however, about placing this dog in a home with kids who would have their friends visit.

Also unless the seller has a deep caring for her, she might not be willing to invest this much of her time doing the above. One plus for the breeder is she's retiring the dog at the age of 2; she could easily breed her a lot more until she's five. My greatest concern is she'll sell it to a puppy mill person where they will continue breeding her death and may not even keep her in their home. It's a workable transfer of ownership if done humanely, but if not could end badly for the dog.
 

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I don’t want to add my dollars into unethical breeder coffers, but have read of various breed rescues attending dog auctions just to get their breeds out of the system. I wonder if you could contact the local poodle rescue, and offer to act as a straw buyer on their behalf. The dog will need to be spayed/gastropexied right away, plus the behavior issues. Rescues could handle all that and would love to help such a young dog. Your have a kind heart but her greeders are not worthy of it. I suspect they are limiting the number of breeders on site to skirt kennel licensing regulations.
 

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I took Sage who was a bitch for a breeder and she was the same way. It takes a good year or so but my friends cannot believe she is the same dog, and she does not have an aggressive bone in her body, unless I make her move off her pillow in the bed, she does not bite but give a low growl. She goes to people and actually will sit on their lap and puff like a cat, she turned out adorable. The breeder told me this prior to me getting her.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Do you want a dog who will be timid for the rest of her life? She probably would get to be comfortable in your house, although maybe not with your kids friends coming in and out, but you probably wouldn't be able to take her anywhere without her being fearful. I have lived with two timid dogs, and it's not fun. You always have to pay attention to not upsetting the dog. She might become a fear biter, and I have lived with that, too. Not at all fun.

The second thing is that you would be supporting this person's doodle business. The same reasons for not buying a puppy mill dog apply here--you may be saving one deserving dog, but you are perpetuating the business.
That is exactly how I felt when I found out she will continue to breed. I wanted to step in when I was told she was shutting down, but I do not want to ever help someone like this continue to breed.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I don’t want to add my dollars into unethical breeder coffers, but have read of various breed rescues attending dog auctions just to get their breeds out of the system. I wonder if you could contact the local poodle rescue, and offer to act as a straw buyer on their behalf. The dog will need to be spayed/gastropexied right away, plus the behavior issues. Rescues could handle all that and would love to help such a young dog. Your have a kind heart but her greeders are not worthy of it. I suspect they are limiting the number of breeders on site to skirt kennel licensing regulations.
I did contact the local rescue and asked if I could do exactly that. I was willing to buy her and hand her over immediately. I do not have experience rehabilitating dogs but was willing to hire the proper trainer, get her fixed and hand her over to rescue if my house was not a good fit. I wanted to help when I was told the woman was not going to breed any more, but might have to pull out completely now. I am waiting to hear back from the rescue to see if they can help me. Thank you very much to everyone for giving me such great advice, I really appreciate it.
 
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