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I don't think kids could be made to understand the timing of the commands. I would use caution with tug as a game for children and dogs.
This is the opinion shared in the Whole Dog Journal article.

8. Children should not play tug with your dog unless and until you are confident they can play by the rules. If you do allow children to play tug with your dog, always directly supervise the game.

Depending on the child and the dog, another option for some might be "flirt pole."' I personally felt even my youngest grandchild was safe to use it (while supervised) with my mini when he was a pup. They had a blast playing with it! I think it helped build the bond between them. And I found it helped teach them both self-control. :)
 
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Chagall's Mom, I agree even when you are sure of the dog children still need to be supervised when playing with dogs, especially high energy games. We want the dogs to be rock solid in their behavior around kids and it is very sad to meet people who are afraid of dogs because they got knocked over (or worse) when they were children. The lessons for both dog and child are invaluable if everyone has a good experience. Can you explain a "flirt pole" a bit more? I am guessing it would be similar to many cat toys that have a stick with a string of some sort and a bouncy toy at the end of the string.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Great info on the game tug of war. I think the flirt pole and playing fetch will be a safer bet for now.


Are there any other book recommendations that are along the lines of Dunbar's methods? Possibly books on how to teach commands, etc? Dunbar's book touches on that and explains a few commands, the foundational ones, but that's about it. Thank you again!
 

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I love Jean Donaldson's Culture Clash for a lot of things, including a wonderfully clear housetraining writeup, among others. It's out in a second edition now.
 

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Hi! I'm currently raising a mini puppy named Cooper (12 weeks on Tuesday) in a house with two children (10 and 14). It's been challenging at times, but we are all getting the hang of it!

A couple of things that seem to work well for us:

We all use the same words, hand gestures and routines with Cooper so it is clear what we expect. We reward correct behaviors with treats and pats and praise and ignore unwanted behavior.

We've learned to recognize when a situation is escalating and will stop and redirect Cooper by saying "Cooper, Sit" firmly. This usually short circuits any nipping/biting/jumping. Any other response, Cooper interprets as continuing play and doesn't work. Sit works for us because he responds to it each and every time! We are working on "Give" as well, but it's still challenging for Cooper to give up his toy in the middle of play. He'll get there soon!

When things get out of control, an adult picks up Cooper and places him in the "puppy only" play pen. This gives everyone some time to settle back down. We find when Cooper gets too overstimulated, he has a harder time with his manners. We are learning where that line is, and trying very hard not to cross it.

If you are a researcher like I am, I have two great book recommendations for you! I found both on Amazon through my Kindle. They were recommended by my trainer.

Raising Puppies & Kids Together: A Guide for Parents by Pia Silvani and Lynn Eckhardt

Perfect Puppy in 7 Days by Sophia Yin - I love her and her approach. She equates teaching your puppy to sit as the puppy version of saying please. We make Cooper say please for everything: to go outside, to eat, to play, for pats...you name it, he sits for it. He responds immediately to the sit command or hand gesture.

The last thing I will say - don't be afraid to make mistakes. I was so anxious about being "errorless" with all my efforts with Cooper that I didn't enjoy him as much for the first few days. I was scared I was going to do something wrong and ruin the puppy, or my kids! Turns out you can learn from your mistakes and so can your puppy. Poodles are super smart and learn so fast. A mistake or two (or seventy) is inevitable. Just learn from it and get right back to the routine.

Enjoy your new puppy! They really are a delight.
 

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Bizzeemamanj, you offered great help there. We didn't have to raise pups with children in the house, but even with two people I think having all members of the household and frequent visitors and caregivers using the same words is essential.

For fam6 if you go to my thread on Ian Dunbar there is a description there of lure reward training which is his specific way to teach basic obedience commands like sit, down and stand. Also there are some videos at his website that may help you. Links for both are below.

http://www.poodleforum.com/23-general-training-obedience/100970-ian-dunbar-seminar-workshop.html

Dog Star Daily
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
"The last thing I will say - don't be afraid to make mistakes. I was so anxious about being "errorless" with all my efforts with Cooper that I didn't enjoy him as much for the first few days. I was scared I was going to do something wrong and ruin the puppy, or my kids! Turns out you can learn from your mistakes and so can your puppy. Poodles are super smart and learn so fast. A mistake or two (or seventy) is inevitable. Just learn from it and get right back to the routine."

Thanks BizeeMama!! I really needed to hear that. I want everything to go smoothly and make as little mistakes as possible but i know it's inevitable!

Thanks everyone for all the book recommendations and all the advice! I really, really, really appreciate it!
 

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Like nobody ever makes a mistake with their children? Don't worry about a few booboos. Mostly they go under the bridge no problem. One of the best pieces of advise I got from my department chairman when I started teaching was that I would make terrible mistakes that first semester, but that if I didn't call attention to them my students probably wouldn't know the difference. He was right about both parts. Those early mistakes taught me a lot! You will do fine.
 
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