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Shopping yesterday and a woman had an extremely small white dog. I thought it was a Maltese puppy, looked like 2 pounds max. At 8 months. She said no it’s a teacup poodle. I wanted to vomit. It looked NOTHING like a poodle is supposed to look. I wish I could have gotten a picture. Then because of all I know from this forum I wanted to educate her but held my tongue. How can people breed sickly strange looking dogs and call them poodles. Clearly this woman had no idea and thought this dog was perfect. It is a sad state of affairs. Any one else have an experience like this? It was my first time...


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Well not that experience exactly but I have seen plenty of people who absolutely ignore their pets. It's a wonder why they even have them.
 

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Yes I have seen it a lot. It is hard not to say anything. A lot of poodles around us have the stumpy little short legs. Their owners have no idea that poodles have long legs. I mainly see teacup chihuahuas here. They can't weigh more than 2 lbs. I cringe every time I see people walk them in busy areas because I feel they will get trampled because they are the size of a rat.
 

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Agree about the stumpy poodles. My husband and I used to dog-sit a lovely, leggy little poodle (not sure toy or mini) and he put poodles on our radar. But almost all the poodles I see at the vet clinic are short legged, heavier bodied dogs, with round skulls, that look like they had some shih tzu or bichon mixed in.
As far as the ahem teacup dogs, we see Yorkie, Maltese, Poodle, and combinations of those. We saw quite a few last fall and many had been imported from Russia/Eastern Europe. Most were in for low blood sugar. One owner had been feeding kibble and the poor thing was simply unable to eat it because it's jaws were so tiny and weak. Another owner reported episodes of extreme lethargy and sometimes shaking, brought in during an episode that was lasting longer-term it was having hypoglycemic seizures. We also had one with a suspected liver shunt, that one did not survive.
In case you can't tell, people who breed these tiny, unhealthy dogs on purpose make me very angry...
 

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Well everything everyone else said about the poor structure of the dog who most certainly was like some sort of mix, but why was it in the gorcery store? Here the only animals allowed in the grocery store are service dogs. I would guess that is true more places than not.
 

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It should not have been. But obviously some people think that rules don’t apply to them. That’s another thing I don’t like to see. Of course service dogs should be allowed, but this dog, I use the term loosely, was clearly no service dog. In fact I would be surprised if it could even walk properly. Poor thing.


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It is also fairly common where I live for people to bring dogs in grocery stores. Sometimes in purses but also just walking around. Weird but that's just the way people are here. It's not allowed but they don't care.
 

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I read a round table discussion of toy breeders in Poodle Variety a few years ago. The easiest way to get a smaller toy, apparently, is to skimp on the legs. A good friend of mine, had two black toys, a male and a female. Her husband had “surprised” her with Buddy from a who know where breeder. She bought the female from a good breeder, because Buddy was so bonded with her spouse and she wanted her own poodle. What a difference! They looked like two different breeds. Buddy was stumpy and and Clarice was so elegant.
 

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I honestly had no idea toy poodles weren't supposed to look like foot stools until I became serious about wanting a spoo. Then it was like, whoa, even the little guys are supposed to have that leggy elegance. Who knew.

I dont normally see dogs in grocery stores, but I do see a lot of purse dogs in clothing stores. I guess it's not really there if it's in a bag. Hmm. Lol.
 

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I would gently ask what it is mixed with? You can always explain the long legs, narrow head with pointy nose, etc. Mixes They can still be cute, but doesn't mean it's a poodle. Hopefully she didn't get taken for a ride having her pay for a full poodle.
 

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I'll probably be the hated of this post, but I had a "teacup" poodle. Ours never had issues with low blood sugars. ours looked stubby legged unless she was shaved. shaved you could she her long legs. I personally don't hate breeders who breed them. In my opinion everyone wants different things in a pet. I personally had big dogs until I got my tiny poodle but then when I moved to a smaller apartment, I knew it wasn't fair to have a large breed. Gia was pad trained and literally went about everywhere I went, Even to my work. No one minded and that made some amazing memories. I've never had a stronger bond with a pet than what I had with Gia. If I was going to have a small dog, I wanted a small dog. Gia was roughly a little over a pound full grown. she lived a great long life. the problem comes in when someone doesn't research prior and doesn't know how to be aware of the possible issues like seizures, low blood sugar, etc. But that goes for all pet owners IMO. you can have responsible and irresponsible owners no matter what size of pet they own.
 
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