Poodle Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,294 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,997 Posts
Very good info to share! thank you. It brought back lots of memories from the Vet Hospital days. Always "when in doubt, don't give it!" So many people don't know how many things are dangerous. Especially common houseplants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,395 Posts
I still wonder if Ari's problem could be because of moldy bird seed. Perhaps she needs more charcoal treatments. I found this article on the Internet.

Moldy food and mycotoxins potential problems for pets

I meant to post this on Sophie Anne's thread but perhaps it belongs on this thread. The article lists some different treatment for various types of mold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
I still wonder if Ari's problem could be because of moldy bird seed. Perhaps she needs more charcoal treatments. I found this article on the Internet.

Moldy food and mycotoxins potential problems for pets

I meant to post this on Sophie Anne's thread but perhaps it belongs on this thread. The article lists some different treatment for various types of mold.
Superficially it does seem to fit but she had none of the cardiac, respiratory or gastric symptoms of mycotoxicosis. Dogs usually get a fever and her temperature was normal throughout. And the tremors didn't start until more than 3 hours after her potential exposure; in general it seems that his type of poisoning acts more on the timescale of minutes to an hour... It's December in Maine and there aren't really any fungi active right now. Perhaps most importantly, Ari never pooped a single bird seed. Not. Even. One. (Trust me, I checked thoroughly!!! I used a sieve! I wanted a sample if she did. :alien2:)

[for further discussion of Ari's symptoms we should scoot back over to my thread, but I also thought this was relevant to the topic at hand here]

I liked the level of detail in this paper:
Tremorgenic Mycotoxicosis in Dogs

I think when a dog presents with tremors or other poisoning symptoms, the only way to treat them is as if they had ingested something (like with charcoal). If it turns out to be something else, no biggie/no harm done, but if you don't give the charcoal and treat it as a poisoning you lose precious time to save the dog.

I am glad that Ari's experience has increased awareness of the danger of mycotoxins in dogs... I'd never even heard of a dog being poisoned by fungus myself!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,949 Posts
I had quite a battle to persuade my sister not to use bird food with raisins in while the dogs were visiting. Fortunately her garden is patrolled by numerous squirrels, who remove anything edible from the ground very quickly. Thank you everyone for such helpful and detailed links - I think this thread should perhaps be a sticky for future reference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Yes you definitely would have seen birdseed in her poop if she had ingested it. Mine graze eat fallen birdseed in our yard on a regular basis and it is VERY obvious that they have done that when I'm poop scooping.
(No chance to get mouldy, as fast as I fill our feeders the birds consume it!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,294 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
OMG! Azalea's?! Buck's picture is my driveway! Good head's up list...
Azaleas are a member of the Rhododendron family and they're all poisonous (leaves) but I believe it takes a fair amount to become toxic. I have Azaleas and Rhodies all over the place and always have when I lived in this state and my dogs have never been interested in them. In fact, I have a lot of other toxic plants in my yard and as mouthy as my Poodles are, how they want to put all kinds of things in their mouths, they don't mess with the poisonous plants. I think if I had one that was highly toxic, that one bite would cause a major health risk, I'd take that out. But a lot of things take quite a bit to be dangerous. So, I'll be studying that list.

The trouble with the bird seed is what falls on the ground and the birds don't necessarily get it all. The dogs could get into it and once it gets wet, it molds. I put my bird feeding on hold until just recently and I haven't noticed the dogs showing an interest. But they are supervised when outside so if they start getting into it, I'll probably stop feeding the birds again. I will go out and rake the area and try to get the spilled seeds under the dirt I guess.

Minipoo and Sophie Anne, thank you for posting those articles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,997 Posts
I think one of the worst group of plants for our dogs and cats are the Lily family. Each and everyone is very toxic. When I worked at the cat only vet hospital, we told families that even if the cat drank the water in the vase that held a cut lily flower it was toxic! We would always start any cat on IV fluids and other Tx in hospital if there was even a chance they had gotten into lilies. Then we would see how the blood work would turn out to continue if needed. Very scary I agree that the links would make great stickies to keep them right in our faces to keep us aware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,294 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Tomatoes and other things

I was wondering about tomatoes because my dogs picked my cherry tomatoes off the plants and would either use them as balls to throw and retrieve for themselves (they know how to self entertain, lol) and gnaw on them. They never took too many...usually working on the same one all day. But I thought maybe I better keep my tomato plants in the front yard this summer after reading from someone here that tomatoes are toxic to dogs, being of the nightshade family. However, I took another look and this is what I found:


Can dogs eat tomatoes? Are tomatoes bad for dogs? | Ask A Vet

Species: Dog
Breed: Bichon Frise Mix
Age: 1-2 years
I have a question about dogs and tomatoes.

I accidentally fed my dog a few(maybe like 3 or 4) cherry tomatoes. I then remembered tomatoes were bad for dogs and now I'm freaking out! Is my dog in danger? Can dogs eat tomatoes?

I have no problem with feeding tomatoes to your dog. Really, tomatoes aren't bad for dogs.

Tomatoes contain a substance called alpha-tomatine. It is found throughout the plant, but is much more concentrated in the leaves and stem. In the fruit, the level of alpha-tomatine is present in small amounts in the green unripened tomato and in tiny amounts in a ripened red tomato.

Tomatine can be toxic to the heart. However, a dog would have to eat a massive amount of tomato before the heart was affected. Additionally, the tomatine is very poorly absorbed by the intestinal tract.

It is more of a concern when cows get into tomato patches and munch away at lots of tomato plant leaves.

Some dogs can have some mild stomach upset from eating tomatoes, but that's about it.

I don't know of a case that has ever been reported of a dog suffering toxic effects from eating tomatoes.

So, the answer to "are tomatoes bad for dogs" is no.

Dr. Marie.

---This question was asked in our Ask A Vet For Free section.---

And additionally, this: (a chart with things that are safe or dangerous and why, which is of particular interest.)


Can dogs eat this? Are these foods bad for dogs?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,810 Posts
If tomatoes were really bad............Molly would be dead............she loves spaghetti and pizza...........LOL! Bad for her weightwise though! Hahaha!!!


AND Garlic? My dad fed his dogs garlic to ward off fleas in the 'old days'!!!! No Italian kitchen is without it!!!LOL!


P.S. I like the second list better...............the first one in this thread made everything bad, weather eaten in moderation or not!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
I wonder if eucalyptus twigs are something to avoid? I take my girls to a park that has a bunch of eucalyptus trees. They seem to enjoy chewing on the small branches and twigs they find laying on the ground. They aren’t swallowing it, they just tear it up and spit it out. Maybe I shouldn’t let them?
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top