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For the two weeks we have had King home, we were doing a great job of crate training potty training. The crate is upstairs so whenever we take him out to the potty area we put him on a leash, and carry him down the staies to the yard where he potties. last night my husband let King out of the ex pen off leash, he flew down the stairs, and peed on the rug. Totally our faúlt. But then last Night we crated him at 9:30, and he usually wakes me up at 1 or 2 to pee. I woke up at 2 and he was still asleep so I woke him up and took him out for a big pee. I woke up again at 6:00 and he was still sleeping. I waited and when I heard him stirring , I went over to the crate and he had just peed all over his toys. He wasn’t wet so he hadn’t laid down or anything. It had just happened. Then this morning, he was asleep in his ex pen. I went downstairs for a second, my husband left the room for a second, King jumped over the edge, went down the stairs and I found him peeing on the stairs. No warning signal, didn’t ask to go out like usual. This is such different and strange behavior. Three accidents in 24 Hours. How do I correct this? Now when he cries for attention I am nervous it is for peeing even if it’s only been 10 minutes. Help,!
 

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I would get him into the vet to be checked for a uti ASAP.
 

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Maybe I’m missing something, but this all sounds perfectly normal to me. :) I’m actually impressed he raced to the stairs when he had to go. That’s progress!

He’s way too young to reliably signal he needs to go out. If he does let you know (e.g. by being restless or “annoying”), it’s probably urgent and possibly already too late. Just keep consistently and proactively taking him out, praising mightily when he goes in the correct spot.

And be sure to thoroughly clean up any accidents. We used vinegar, but some have better luck with enzyme solutions. It helps, too, to keep his sleep space very streamlined for easy cleaning and to avoid any lingering smells. You probably don’t want to be leaving toys in there anyway, as most are a choke hazard. I consider Kongs one of the few exceptions to this rule, and even then you need to make sure they’re suitable for your puppy’s life stage and chewing habits.

We never really gave Peggy a chance to stir in her crate. We took her out on a strict schedule and slowwwwwly extended the time between potty sessions, using her behaviour as a guide. We also wrote down her daily meals, treats, exercise, vet visits, medications, etc., making note of the time of each accident, where she was, and what preceded it. As patterns emerged, we adjusted her schedule accordingly.

I find this especially useful in a multi-person household. Otherwise half your conversations become: “Did you take the dog out? When? Pee or poo?”
 

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Maybe I’m missing something, but this all sounds perfectly normal to me. :) I’m actually impressed he raced to the stairs when he had to go. That’s progress!

He’s way too young to reliably signal he needs to go out. If he does let you know (e.g. by being restless or “annoying”), it’s probably urgent and possibly already too late. Just keep consistently and proactively taking him out, praising mightily when he goes in the correct spot.

And be sure to thoroughly clean up any accidents. We used vinegar, but some have better luck with enzyme solutions. It helps, too, to keep his sleep space very streamlined for easy cleaning and to avoid any lingering smells. You probably don’t want to be leaving toys in there anyway, as most are a choke hazard. I consider Kongs one of the few exceptions to this rule, and even then you need to make sure they’re suitable for your puppy’s life stage and chewing habits.

We never really gave Peggy a chance to stir in her crate. We took her out on a strict schedule and slowwwwwly extended the time between potty sessions, using her behaviour as a guide. We also wrote down her daily meals, treats, exercise, vet visits, medications, etc., making note of the time of each accident, where she was, and what preceded it. As patterns emerged, we adjusted her schedule accordingly.

I find this especially useful in a multi-person household. Otherwise half your conversations become: “Did you take the dog out? When? Pee or poo?”
Thank you so much. You always have such helpful supportive advice. My husband identified that he let puppy have a big drink of water at bedtime. Oops. Today is seeming to be back to normal. I like the idea of a written diary of activity. The days are all running together in puppy activity.
 

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Thank you so much. You always have such helpful supportive advice. My husband identified that he let puppy have a big drink of water at bedtime. Oops. Today is seeming to be back to normal. I like the idea of a written diary of activity. The days are all running together in puppy activity.
Glad I can help! And let your husband know that wasn’t an oops at all. Peggy always has her biggest drink of the day as she settles into her crate for the night. It’s a good thing, as a thirsty puppy is a restless puppy and a restless puppy doesn’t get deep, restorative sleep. That deep sleep is what allows puppy to go so long between potty breaks at night.

I also think that withholding water would encourage puppy to guzzle it when he can, resulting in more urgent pees.

So keep doing what you’re doing. And remember he’s just a tiny baby. :)
 

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I think that's part of the normal process of trying to get in sync. You're not going to hit 100%. There's light at the end of the tunnel because eventually his bladder will be strong enough and you will get a full nights sleep.

-It's been mentioned in a past thread, but keep a log of when King poos or pee's to give so you can try to get him out 10-15 minutes before you expect a pee. For example, you can text your SO "pee and poop at ___" so your both in sync.

-Keep an eye out for food he consumes with a higher water content (ie: watermelon, or juicy chicken) because he'll need to go out sooner than you anticipate.

-Keep an eye out for when he plays because he'll probably have to pee after.

-Buy lots of paper towels.. you'll use them.

There was a handful of times Basil pee'd on the floor when I was getting my shoes on, she would pee inside after being outside for 20 minutes, and she would pee as we were going outside.

Your might step in pee at some point too, just a heads up lol. Why is my sock wet?
 

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My personal opinion is that potty training a young puppy is overstressed in importance. People get all worked up about perfect potty training at a time in the puppy's life when, physically, potty training is a very difficult- maybe even impossible- thing. In a month, maybe 2 , the bladder will be developed more, and it will become way faster for it to click. We once housetrained a 8 month old dog who had never been successfully housetrained and who appeared on our doorstep in just 2 days. No puppy has ever figured it out reliably in 2 days! They just aren't physically mature. So I didn't stress, get angry or blame either of us if I had to clean up.

At this same time as many people obsess over housetraining, the puppy is in its prime socialization window. Unlike potty training, socializing gets more and more difficult as the puppy gets older, and, in a month or two, the socialization window closes and you end up desensitizing instead of socializing.

So honestly? I refused to stress out about potty training the first little bit. I did my best, brought puppy out frequently, praised and gave treats for going outdoors, and kept a bottle of enzyme cleaner handy, because mistakes are normal. If the puppy peed- oh well. Not worth worrying about, she was "caught short' as my grandma would say. Just mop it up and move on with the day. I was also trying to litter box train, which added a layer of complexity as she would sometimes miss.

Instead of worrying about housetraining, I took my handy spray bottle of enzyme cleaner and a roll of paper towels and a towel, stuck them in my purse, and carried my puppy with me EVERYWHERE I could.

At 16 weeks or so, I started to be more serious and honestly her bladder was a lot more mature. By 6 months (when most dogs have decent bladder control), she wasn't having accidents indoors, and that would have even been faster if it wasn't for me staying with my mom, whose adult dog uses pee pads (grr)! Is it really a mistake if your spoo uses the designated (small) dog peeing area? Sigh. Her bladder fully matured by about 8 months, and she mostly stopped excited peeing upon meeting new people/dogs at that point.

Today, housetraining is a distant blur to me. If my method took an extra week or two? Did I end up cleaning up a few more times? Or a few dozen more times? No idea. However, I do see the results of socialization every time I take my adult dog in public and she is unconcerned with grocery carts, screaming kids, construction equipment, weird surfaces, floating docks, etc.
 

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Just patiently keep telling yourself that you have a “baby dog.” Keep working on the potty training and remind yourself over and over and over that he’s just a “baby dog” with a tiny, immature bladder. A “baby dog” will sometimes go potty where and when you don’t want him to and they seriously do go a lot. They go when they are excited. They go when they exercise. They go when they are unsure. Some will go if they can’t see you, that’s what mine did. They will even pee outside then pee again when they come inside. Peeing is what puppies do. 😉 It’s all just a part of having a ”baby dog.” It’s so easy to fall into the thinking that
complete house training all happen quickly and for some pups it does but for most it takes time and consistent training along with physical maturity and some pups just take longer than others. Just like baby humans, baby puppies will have their own individual timetable.
Hang in there! Keep training. Your puppy seems quite normal. It really does get better! 😊
 

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Just patiently keep telling yourself that you have a “baby dog.” Keep working on the potty training and remind yourself over and over and over that he’s just a “baby dog” with a tiny, immature bladder. A “baby dog” will sometimes go potty where and when you don’t want him to and they seriously do go a lot. They go when they are excited. They go when they exercise. They go when they are unsure. Some will go if they can’t see you, that’s what mine did. They will even pee outside then pee again when they come inside. Peeing is what puppies do. 😉 It’s all just a part of having a ”baby dog.” It’s so easy to fall into the thinking that
complete house training all happen quickly and for some pups it does but for most it takes time and consistent training along with physical maturity and some pups just take longer than others. Just like baby humans, baby puppies will have their own individual timetable.
Hang in there! Keep training. Your puppy seems quite normal. It really does get better! 😊
Thank you! Your encouragement really helps.
 

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My personal opinion is that potty training a young puppy is overstressed in importance. People get all worked up about perfect potty training at a time in the puppy's life when, physically, potty training is a very difficult- maybe even impossible- thing. In a month, maybe 2 , the bladder will be developed more, and it will become way faster for it to click. We once housetrained a 8 month old dog who had never been successfully housetrained and who appeared on our doorstep in just 2 days. No puppy has ever figured it out reliably in 2 days! They just aren't physically mature. So I didn't stress, get angry or blame either of us if I had to clean up.

At this same time as many people obsess over housetraining, the puppy is in its prime socialization window. Unlike potty training, socializing gets more and more difficult as the puppy gets older, and, in a month or two, the socialization window closes and you end up desensitizing instead of socializing.

So honestly? I refused to stress out about potty training the first little bit. I did my best, brought puppy out frequently, praised and gave treats for going outdoors, and kept a bottle of enzyme cleaner handy, because mistakes are normal. If the puppy peed- oh well. Not worth worrying about, she was "caught short' as my grandma would say. Just mop it up and move on with the day. I was also trying to litter box train, which added a layer of complexity as she would sometimes miss.

Instead of worrying about housetraining, I took my handy spray bottle of enzyme cleaner and a roll of paper towels and a towel, stuck them in my purse, and carried my puppy with me EVERYWHERE I could.

At 16 weeks or so, I started to be more serious and honestly her bladder was a lot more mature. By 6 months (when most dogs have decent bladder control), she wasn't having accidents indoors, and that would have even been faster if it wasn't for me staying with my mom, whose adult dog uses pee pads (grr)! Is it really a mistake if your spoo uses the designated (small) dog peeing area? Sigh. Her bladder fully matured by about 8 months, and she mostly stopped excited peeing upon meeting new people/dogs at that point.

Today, housetraining is a distant blur to me. If my method took an extra week or two? Did I end up cleaning up a few more times? Or a few dozen more times? No idea. However, I do see the results of socialization every time I take my adult dog in public and she is unconcerned with grocery carts, screaming kids, construction equipment, weird surfaces, floating docks, etc.
This is great advice. I actually took my towels and spray bottle and went for a field trip to Ace Hardware after reading this. King even got his picture taken! He loved it! And no accidents. But I was ready!!
 
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