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Absolutely agree - she is nervous and trying to placate you. Get down on the floor and let her come to you, and as she gets more confident teach her a "Pick up?" cue. I use a cupped hand, and my dogs will stand still and shift one leg to make it easier for me to slip my hand underneath them. It's important whenever possible to respect her wishes if she backs off and indicates that she doesn't want to be picked up - many small dogs hate being swooped upon and swept into the air - consider your own feelings if suddenly lifted to the height of the treetops by a giant, especially one you did not yet know well enough to be sure they would not drop you!
 
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Discussion Starter #22
Absolutely agree - she is nervous and trying to placate you. Get down on the floor and let her come to you, and as she gets more confident teach her a "Pick up?" cue. I use a cupped hand, and my dogs will stand still and shift one leg to make it easier for me to slip my hand underneath them. It's important whenever possible to respect her wishes if she backs off and indicates that she doesn't want to be picked up - many small dogs hate being swooped upon and swept into the air - consider your own feelings if suddenly lifted to the height of the treetops by a giant, especially one you did not yet know well enough to be sure they would not drop you!
馃憤 makes sense
 

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There鈥檚 nothing worrisome about this behavior. Your puppy is unsure and is doing appeasing behaviors and preparing for you to pick him up.

You need to adjust your posture and tone of voice if necessary. Make yourself smaller by kneeling down instead of standing. Use a soft, high pitched voice instead of your normal voice. Sit on the floor a few feet away from the dog and let him come to you. If he does, it will be a sign of trust. Don鈥檛 force yourself on him. Let him come at his own pace. If there is no emergency situation, no need to pick him up if he doesn鈥檛 want to.

This is a very sensitive little dog that requires a very gentle approach. Being forceful or too straight forward with him will break his spirit. The puppies often do submissive peeing when the owners are too harsh on them.

He looks very sweet. With the right approach, you will see him gain confidence and transform in front of your eyes.
 

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What was the breeder feeding him? Are you feeding that food still? Is there something about that food you don't like? That's just curiosity.
Are you feeding Max puppy food still?

If you decide to make a change, just remember to introduce the new food slowly but if he's doing well on his current food, don't try changing just yet. He'll be going thru his adjustment period for a little while yet and changing his food could set off gastrointestinal upsets.
 

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I looked at the ingredients and analysis and there are some things which give me pause. There's a current thread here which discusses some choices and the still-under-study concerns with some ingredients (which are in many foods, especially grain-free foods).
ETA: I re-read a comment from a member with a science background, revisited my saved files and am feeling less concerns re the ingredients but I still question the higher protein content. Orijen is a well-regarded food, so I don't see any reason not to feed it.


another fairly current thread with more information and some (of the same) recommendations on brands


There are other choices such as those mentioned in those other threads which are as nutritionally sound, and may even cost less.
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
What was the breeder feeding him? Are you feeding that food still? Is there something about that food you don't like? That's just curiosity.
Are you feeding Max puppy food still?

If you decide to make a change, just remember to introduce the new food slowly but if he's doing well on his current food, don't try changing just yet. He'll be going thru his adjustment period for a little while yet and changing his food could set off gastrointestinal upsets.
What ever breeder gave him, when I brought him home he did not eat for 2 days.
orijen he started to eat. Max is eating the same food orijen for puppies. Both poodles toy and mini eat orijen without any issues. Some times I mix it with wet food. They go crazy about it and then they are lazy to learn any tricks. 馃槀馃槀馃槀馃槀馃槀

just wanted to make sure if its a good brand. I Dont care about money when it comes to my pupps, for me its essential to feed them excellent food, thats why Im in search for right food.
 

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It's not unusual for a pup to not eat much for a day or two when they are taken from their only known home and family and brought to a new one.
It's a very stressful time for them.
Good news is that you already had Max on a high quality puppy food and that Munchen (Munchin?) likes it too.
 
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What do you mean he goes in circles ? Is he trying to get out of your grip ? Some dogs don鈥檛 like being picked up very much. My dog, Beckie (blue dog below) is not terribly fond of it so I don鈥檛 do it unless I have to or she asks me too (like at the vet).

You can try to make it more fun by giving treats when you pick him up, so he associates being picked up with goodies. After a while you start giving treats less often as the dog has gotten used to it and probably likes it by then.

Also, one important thing to do is respect your dog鈥檚 preference and not pick him up unless necessary. Often, we do things to dogs because we, humans, like it. Not the dog.
I got a 4 month old female poodle that had some unfortunate social fears: she would hide in the rear of my car as far as she could be from me for the first six months or so; she would not go near any women of any age until she was 4+ years; about the only issue remaining is that she barks at almost anything in the middle of the night, right now she's outside barking at something (couldn't see it).
Once I was in Harper's Ferry visiting the Civil War sites. I went to the railroad station next to where the rivers join. A CSX freight went by. Wheels scretched!! She panicked. Her body shook. I tried to get her to come with me (she was on a leash). She just froze; she shivered uncontrollably. So, I sat next to her, wrapped my arms around her, and whispered "sweet nothings" in her ear. After a few minutes she settled down. Ten minutes another train went by. She had no problem.
So, time, patience, and touching them helps. Heh, come to think of it, doesn't that work for humans, too?
 

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Yes, I agree with the suggestions above:
  • Take him to the vet for a baseline check, and suggestions/opinion.
  • Get down on his level. You may appear to be a giant standing over him! I would even try laying on my back and let him come explore you. Be really slow and gentle about it and reward him for little approaches and improvements. It could take many days, or even weeks.

I too am curious if he did this when you were at the breeder. And if he did it with the breeder.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Almost all the time when I try to pick up my 7 month old toy poodle, Quietly and calmly
He pees.

How do I fix that??
 

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Again, it is submissive behaviour - "Smell me, I am just a harmless baby!". Give him time to decide whether he wants to be picked up, keeping handling calm and gentle, and building his confidence will help with submissive urination.
 

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All of those suggestions will apply to submissive urination. Think of your puppy as a dog with very sensitive hearing. You need only whisper with your actions and body language. No shouting. :)
Yes, 'whisper in voice'', 'whisper in actions'. What I mean by that is super calm and gentle actions.

Do you meditate?

I had a very fascinating experience with my Spoo when he was a puppy. He did No, 0, zero, submissive urination with me, but when a good friend came around he did it every time. She was a very strong, powerful, assertive woman, which I admired, but apparently my dog reacted to her energy. She warned me that he would be a problem forever. But he never was a problem with me, and as long as I was close to him he never did this with her or others after.

Then I met a woman who did Reiki healing energy work, which I had also studied. Watching him with her was amazing. He practically melted into her, like he did with me. I believe many dogs are extremely sensitive to energy fields, some much more than others. Perhaps try meditating before you do some of these very gentle things that we have suggested here..... I will be so interested to hear back....

Where are you? It would be fun to meet and experiment:)
 

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Discussion Starter #40
All of those suggestions will apply to submissive urination. Think of your puppy as a dog with very sensitive hearing. You need only whisper with your actions and body language. No shouting. :)
Will he Eventually change and react normally?
Or he could stay like this for long time?
 
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